{DOWNLOAD BOOK} ì Buffalo Gals and Other Animal Presences · eBook or E-pub free

Rating is for the novella, Buffalo Gals, Won t You Come Out Tonight, which is wonderful LeGuin at her very best Won the Hugo for best novelette and World Fantasy awards, 1988 I need to reread this collection Great cover art, too Sadly, our library doesn t own one, it s OOP Thriftbooks now has it on my want list.I didn t much care for the illustrated version, The illustrations didn t work for me But don t miss the title story Also Rating is for the novella, Buffalo Gals, Won t You Come Out Tonight, which is wonderful LeGuin at her very best Won the Hugo for best novelette and World Fantasy awards, 1988 I need to reread this collection Great cover art, too Sadly, our library doesn t own one, it s OOP Thriftbooks now has it on my want list.I didn t much care for the illustrated version, The illustrations didn t work for me But don t miss the title story Also available elsewhere, Reading Ursula K Le Guin is often a transformative experience she never fails to provide new worlds to explore and new ways of looking at old ideas, or in this case, old ways of looking at newfangled colonialist ideas This collection of short stories and poems links the exploitation of the land and nature with colonialism although she does not employ the term , and the devaluing of women and children As she states in the introduction By climbing up into his own head and shutting out every Reading Ursula K Le Guin is often a transformative experience she never fails to provide new worlds to explore and new ways of looking at old ideas, or in this case, old ways of looking at newfangled colonialist ideas This collection of short stories and poems links the exploitation of the land and nature with colonialism although she does not employ the term , and the devaluing of women and children As she states in the introduction By climbing up into his own head and shutting out every voice but his own, civilized man has gone deaf He can t hear the wolf calling him brother not master, but brother He can t hear the earth calling him child not father, but son.I think it s accurate to say that throughout this collection, particularly in the first story, Buffalo Gals, Won t You Come Out Tonight, Le Guin attempts to write from an Indigenous worldview, personifying important animals like Coyote and Chickadee Given that the components of this book were written in the late 1970s and early 1980s, I thought it was quite remarkable As a reader in 2019 I wanted her to explicitly reference colonization colonialism and name honour the groups she was attempting to stand with as an ally I highly recommend reading this article The NishPossessed Reading Le Guin in Indian Country for a bit of a deeper analysis of Le Guin s background as the child of anthropologists and the incorporation of indigeneity in Le Guin s work.For me, the most interesting story in this collection was Vaster than Empires and More Slow, set in the Hainian universe and the only really sci fi story of the collection The story looks at a group of researchers surveying potential habitable worlds, who all have their own mental health and personality issues but particularly struggle with one colleague who s described as an autistic in this case meaning that he was isolated and unable to function in society as a result of being extremely empathic and overwhelmed by others emotions When the group explores a new planet, his role becomes crucial and the dynamics between the people and life on the planet are fascinating Again, the language she uses around neurodiversity is a little uncomfortable in 2019, but her portrayal is incredibly sensitive and nuanced and succeeds at really making the reader feel the pain of stigma against people who are neurodivergent My biggest qualm with this collection was simply that Le Guin over introduces some of the stories and poems in a way that really affects the first reading, in some cases spoiling twist endings Some of the stories also feel quite repetitive, including several that use a bait and switch technique by revealing the narrator wasn t who you thought it was They re good on their own but it hurts the surprise to read them next to each other.If you re going to pick this up, I d suggest reading Buffalo Gals , Vaster Than Empires , and everything from Schrodinger s Cat to the end of the book, but avoiding reading the introductions to each piece until after you finish them I m at the stage now that when I come across a Le Guin book, I pick it up This one is slightly obscure in that it s a republication of her award winning novella Buffalo Gals Won t You Come Out Tonight , bundled together with other Le Guin short stories and poems that reflect a similar theme to that of the title track namely, the idea that animals, plants and all of nature speak clearly to us, but we are too self absorbed to listen to them, or even acknowledge that they can communicate with u I m at the stage now that when I come across a Le Guin book, I pick it up This one is slightly obscure in that it s a republication of her award winning novella Buffalo Gals Won t You Come Out Tonight , bundled together with other Le Guin short stories and poems that reflect a similar theme to that of the title track namely, the idea that animals, plants and all of nature speak clearly to us, but we are too self absorbed to listen to them, or even acknowledge that they can communicate with us, or that they have anything worth saying The title track alone is worth the price of admission a story in which a young girl survives an airplane crash in the Southwestern desert, enters the dream world of animal folklore and is rescued by the trickster Coyote Other stories tale on the animal s POV in classic tropes werewolves, lab rats, horse camps One indulges in academic discussions of animal languages, while another story set in Le Guin s Hainish Cycle universe chronicles interstellar explorers encountering a planet where the wilderness is alive inways than one For me, the poems are the weak link here they re okay, but the stories are the main attraction And with a couple of exceptions, they re classic Le Guin, evoking a wide range of emotions suspense, melancholy, humor as each story unfolds The ecological theme may be a little too on point for some readers, but that s their problem For myself, it s always nice to find a book you didn t know existed by a favorite author it s even nicer when it turns out to be a hidden gem This is one of those Ursula K Le Guin s Buffalo Gals and Other Animal Presences is a revelation All the stories, poems, plus two novelettes in this collection deal with worlds seen through the eyes of animals and even vegetation As the author writes in the introduction And for the people Civilization calls primitive, savage, or undeveloped, including young children, the continuity, interdependence, and community of all life, all forms of being on earth, is a lived fact, made conscious in narrative myth, ri Ursula K Le Guin s Buffalo Gals and Other Animal Presences is a revelation All the stories, poems, plus two novelettes in this collection deal with worlds seen through the eyes of animals and even vegetation As the author writes in the introduction And for the people Civilization calls primitive, savage, or undeveloped, including young children, the continuity, interdependence, and community of all life, all forms of being on earth, is a lived fact, made conscious in narrative myth, ritual, fiction This continuity of existence, neither benevolent nor cruel itself, is fundamental to whatever morality may be built upon it Only Civilization builds its morality by denying its foundation.I particularly liked the novelettes Buffalo Gals, Won t You Come Out Tonight and Vaster Than Empires and More Slow About half of the short stories and poems are also of uniform excellence Which is not bad for a work cobbled together from previously published material over a long period of time These stories and poems are wonderful One of the stories, The Author of the Acacia Seeds and Other Extracts From the Journal of Therolinguistics, I ve read before.Not sure where But I loved it just as much the second time around And it s because of this story that I can t understand why Ken Liu s The Bookmaking Habits of Select Species has been so lauded no offence to him in the slightest, I am a Liu fan, but Ursula already wrote that story, better, in 1974. Ursula Le Guin is such a consummate word smith that her books are never boring.But I just couldn t get into this one It s written from that modern Indian with Coyote in sneakers POV, which isn t exactly my cup of tea.From the back cover By climbing up into his own head and shutting out every voice but his own, civilized man has gone deaf He can t hear the wolf calling him brother not master, but brother He can t hear the earth calling him child not father, but son And Ursula K Le Ursula Le Guin is such a consummate word smith that her books are never boring.But I just couldn t get into this one It s written from that modern Indian with Coyote in sneakers POV, which isn t exactly my cup of tea.From the back cover By climbing up into his own head and shutting out every voice but his own, civilized man has gone deaf He can t hear the wolf calling him brother not master, but brother He can t hear the earth calling him child not father, but son And Ursula K Le Guin does hear the animals voices, and as she shows us in this luminous collection of one novella, ten stores and eighteen poems, they are magical, fascinating and terrifying In the title novella, a child survives a plane crash and enters the Dream Time of primitive myths, where the coyote knows secrets about that world and this one In other stores we journey further into unknown realms, like the deep space planet where only fear dwells, or the unfamiliar worlds of wolves, rats, and horses whose realities make us question our own I didn t like the poetry at all, and neither did I care much for the prose writings All in all, a disappointment for me, as normally I adore this author s work Ah, Ms Le Guin, I would devour anything you put before me, even short stories and essays In this collection we see her ability to look from incredibly diverse perspectives, forcing us to perceive life in so many different ways My personal favorites Mazes, The Wife s Story, and The Direction of the Road, this last fills my mind whenever I am walking, biking, or driving past trees and I fear for them. My favorite author bar none , Ursula K Le Guin, is hard to categorize Her stories here, some fantasy, some science fiction she prefers the label speculative fiction all share an animal perspective or a shift in perspective from the dominant human one Some are short stories one is probably a novella she disrespects others labels in beautiful ways. {DOWNLOAD BOOK} ¸ Buffalo Gals and Other Animal Presences î The bestselling author of the Earthsea trilogy, The Left Hand of Darkness and The Dispossessed presents a collection of short stories and poems that takes the reader into a magical, whimsical world where the line between human and animal is quite different from our world Winner of the Hugo and World Fantasy AwardsContents Come into animal presence Denise Levertov Buffalo gals, won t you come out tonight Three rock poems Basalt Flints Mt St Helens Omphalos Mazes Wife s stories Five vegetable poems Torrey pines reserve Lewis and Clarke and after West Texas Xmas over Crown of Laurel Direction of the road Vaster than empires and slow Seven bird and beast poems What is going on in the Oaks For Ted Found poem Totem Winter downs Man eater Sleeping out White donkey Horse camp Four cat poems Tabby Lorenzo Black Leonard in negative space Conversation with a silence For Leonard, Darko, and Burton Watson Schrodinger s cat Author of the Acacia seeds and other extracts from the journal of the journal of the association of Therolinguistics May s lion Eighth elegy, from Duino elegies of RM Rilke She unnames them A spirited, gracefully polemical introduction and the final story, She Unnames Them , frame this collection of fiction and poetry, placing it in a natural but unsentimental light These are not really talking animal stories they are about human apprehension of natural creation including rocks and plants and the relations this apprehension governs or, how communication makes communities Seven of ten stories and seven ofpoems having already been published, while a couple of pieces read like working drafts Among the best pieces is the title story like many of the others, it works its effect through a reversal of the usual human point of view Library Journal Ursula K Le Guin turns perspective on its head in these short stories Each are from a new and surprising perspective and the poetry is just as surprising and wonderful Great book of short stories I need to read her Hainish Cycles books now.