(((Free E-pub))) ☂ The Stone Gods ☊ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

I may perhaps return to write a proper review of this book at some point for now I am in tears. (((Free E-pub))) ✗ The Stone Gods ⇯ On the airwaves, all the talk is of the new blue planet pristine and habitable, like our ownmillion years ago, before we took it to the edge of destruction And off the air, Billie and Spike are falling in love What will happen when their story combines with the world s story When one has to give a Jeanette Winterson novel a two star rating, it s blindingly obvious that today is not a good day I adored Written on the Body, The Passion and Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit This book was a mess, and was a concoction of genres that at the end of the day, just didn t work Winterson is an incredibly unique writer, and she has a wonderful way with words, and that is one of the main reasons why I enjoy her works I feel like The Stone Gods wasn t thought through enough, and When one has to give a Jeanette Winterson novel a two star rating, it s blindingly obvious that today is not a good day I adored Written on the Body, The Passion and Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit This book was a mess, and was a concoction of genres that at the end of the day, just didn t work Winterson is an incredibly unique writer, and she has a wonderful way with words, and that is one of the main reasons why I enjoy her works I feel like The Stone Gods wasn t thought through enough, and a truck load of ideas were just chucked into the plot, with no real structure It felt chaotic, and with Winterson, that s usually a positive aspect as I usually embrace chaos, but with this, it made the story pointless There were no real character developments here, and when I actually did become interested in a character, that section of the story was closed, and another had began I was left high and dry I usually love how Winterson writes about love, it is truly magical, but within these pages, I was doing some serious eye rolling It makes me wonder if Winterson was quite well when writing The Stone Gods This is definitely one of Winterson s weaker books, especially in comparison to Written on the Body, and I m left feeling rather unfulfilled, unfortunately DNF page 58I had to read this book for a class at University All I will say is that the storyline was extremely confusing and I struggled to connect with any of the characters The writing style was most definitely not for me Okay, okay This is tricky.We all give ratings to books and everything within their genres I do anyway Five stars for this thing is not the same as five stars for that thing But the problem with that is that the genres have to mean something And be identifiable I have real thing for Jeanette Winterson It dates back to Gut Symmetries, which I read at an impressionable time maybe 17, though all my times are fairly impressionable It was just beautiful and expansive and different and sent Okay, okay This is tricky.We all give ratings to books and everything within their genres I do anyway Five stars for this thing is not the same as five stars for that thing But the problem with that is that the genres have to mean something And be identifiable I have real thing for Jeanette Winterson It dates back to Gut Symmetries, which I read at an impressionable time maybe 17, though all my times are fairly impressionable It was just beautiful and expansive and different and sentimental And had physics and lesbians and everything And The Passion was another knockout beautiful book And there s been others that have been less satisfying, but I m still hooked.So this is science fiction Loosely Some of my favourite science fiction is by people who don t do science fiction Atwood s Oryx and Crake God science fiction is such a stupid label.Anyway, it s starts out very traditionally science fictiony, to the point where you have to believe it s intentionally so, and then moves on through different lives and eras It tells the story of environmental dystopia, through three ages on different planets, but really it sabout us About the things we do and what we are Emotional and power hungry and wasteful and incapable of change It s like a tribute to society and the individual s condition that is both an admonishment and celebration all at the same time I just can figure it out Why is this even a love story It s imbalanced.Just back to the sci fi thing for a second There s a scene where the men in a star ship are sitting around telling tales about planets And man that is some beautiful stuff I d copy out a passage but I left the book elsewhere There s so much potential for imagination in stories of other worlds In infinite space you can paint whatever landscape you desire And yet most of what we get sticks to spaceships and laserguns This story has some of what I m wanting, but not quite enough, and in the end it s only a side to her deeper themes, so I m probably raising this in the wrong place anways Science fiction that weaves together future, past, and present in three separate but interlinked stories that comment on humanity s penchant for destroying the world, contrasted with an individual s ability to love In the first section, we see a futuristic setting where materialism and vanity have been taken to extremes The planet Orbus has been decimated by the inhabitants, so they are searching for a new planet on which to start over In the second part, we are abruptly shifted to the 18th c Science fiction that weaves together future, past, and present in three separate but interlinked stories that comment on humanity s penchant for destroying the world, contrasted with an individual s ability to love In the first section, we see a futuristic setting where materialism and vanity have been taken to extremes The planet Orbus has been decimated by the inhabitants, so they are searching for a new planet on which to start over In the second part, we are abruptly shifted to the 18th century, where Captain Cook s ship is visiting Easter Island The titular stone gods are a reference to this island s moai statues In the last story, set near present time, Earth has experienced World War III called Post 3 War , a corporation governs society, and people impacted by the fallout are attempting to survive in the wreckage The protagonists in each of the three times have the same names Billie Billy and Spike Spikkers , and the relationship forming between them is another primary area of focus.In two of the three timelines, Spike is portrayed as a Robo sapiens, programmed to gain an understanding of humanity, and designed to learn enough to eventually be able to make better decisions for the benefit of society, rather than to its detriment as humans have done I would like to have seendeeply drawn characters, especially Spike, as she is of core importance The dialogue can seem overly explanatory, but the prose is elegant At its heart this is a cautionary tale of history repeating itself, not learning from mistakes of the past, and the dangers of overindulgences without regard to impact Winterson applies this message to themes of environmental responsibility, authoritarian control, and abuse of technology She examines questions of how an individual can cope in such a society.The book itself, The Stone Gods, makes several appearances, as well as Captain Cook s Journal At times it can be confusing, requiring patience and re reading in certain sections, but eventually Winterson brings it all together It s definitely not for everyone, as it reflects a rather bleak outlook for humankind and the message can become rather heavy handed It will appeal to readers of literary science fiction in the vein of Ursula K LeGuin or Margaret Atwood s MaddAddam trilogy Memorable quotesThe key to happiness is tolerance of those who do not do as you do Love is an intervention Why do we not choose it T he future of the planet is uncertain Human beings aren t just in a mess, we are a mess We have made every mistake, justified ourselves, and made the same mistakes again and again It s as though we re doomed to repetition So, I ve finished reading The Stone Gods by Jeanette Winterson, and my reactions are mixed, to say the least My primary reaction was one of intense sadness she really does believe that she s braving new territory She is completely unaware that she s hacking through a jungle right next to a long, well trodden road and the crew that s building it is far, far ahead of her, and her course takes her away from the best conclusions She s off in a strange, dualistic universe in which robots come to So, I ve finished reading The Stone Gods by Jeanette Winterson, and my reactions are mixed, to say the least My primary reaction was one of intense sadness she really does believe that she s braving new territory She is completely unaware that she s hacking through a jungle right next to a long, well trodden road and the crew that s building it is far, far ahead of her, and her course takes her away from the best conclusions She s off in a strange, dualistic universe in which robots come to feel just because There are dialogues about how humans have emotions and yet this obviously emotional robots does not, and yet not a single word toward the general consensus that emotions are what give us the capacity to come to a conclusion, to shut rationalization down and make a decision, to break ties between competing choices, and without emotions we would be helpless When a video game acts as if it wants to defeat you, it has been given that want by its developer at some stage, we turn off the abstraction and act as if the game wants to defeat us Winterson doesn t understand this Winterson picks up the glittering tools of modern science fiction and engages in bronze age reflections with them.The Stone Gods is science fiction written as an excuse to do whatever the hell she wants, without regard for the reader s sense of continuity or rationale The sense of used furniture is strong.Winterson is trying to do too much she s trying to tell a love story She s trying to tell a story of ecological disaster She s trying to tell a story about fatalism, and about how fatalism is the only logical attitude to take given Mankind s tendency to destroy himself Individual death is a metaphor for the world s end not in an entropic sense, but in a personal one, and an immediate one.Toward the end of the book her lyricism returns, coupled with some really stupid scenes stolen from the worst post apocalyptic fiction you could possibly imagine Think Shirow s Appleseed, watched without translation or subtitles, and the author then tries to re write what she saw as farce That s where it s going.But the ending makes me cry because the writing is so good, even if the writer is telling you the character is hallucinating as she dies But Winterson makes me cry reliably I wouldn t waste my time reading her science fiction ever again If you love breathtakingly beautiful writing, check out The World, And Other Places, her collection of short stories Each is small, worth your time, and not an insult to your intelligence Auuugh this book is a mess The pitch must have been something like, I m thinking Robinson Crusoe but scifi and with androids, and also post WWIII dystopia, but also space exploration and Easter Island and dinosaurs Okay, and I also wanna get Nietzsche s eternal return in there, and what it means to be human, and nature vs nurture, and adoption Ohhh and none of it will connect except through really obvious hung lanterns like calling the protagonist of each section Billie y, and how awful huma Auuugh this book is a mess The pitch must have been something like, I m thinking Robinson Crusoe but scifi and with androids, and also post WWIII dystopia, but also space exploration and Easter Island and dinosaurs Okay, and I also wanna get Nietzsche s eternal return in there, and what it means to be human, and nature vs nurture, and adoption Ohhh and none of it will connect except through really obvious hung lanterns like calling the protagonist of each section Billie y, and how awful humans are Jeanette Winterson loves chaos in her narratives Sometimes this works like magic, other times she misses massively This was a big miss The pacing was completely off just when she d finally built enough character depth and motivation for you to get mildly invested in a narrative, she d switch to the next one And, unfortunately, her main characters were all the same as her usual what I m starting to suspect is autobiographical protagonist acerbic, lonely British lesbian who doesn t fit in and falls in love with a woman robot whatever beyond her means.I dunno Maybe if I d read this a few years ago, the complete disconnect from line to line, paragraph to paragraph, wouldn t have bothered me so much As it stands, I was rolling my eyes at all the random beautiful bits about love and in no way invested which is too bad, because I always appreciate how Winterson writes about love, so something was really off here Nothing anyone did really made sense, and it all seemed like a vehicle for Winterson to test out scifi as a genrewhile still sticking to everything she d done in the past, and notreallygoing much further with it.Sadly too disjointed, too irrelevant, too ridiculous for any real import Gorgeous cover though As she did in The Passion , Winterson displays her gift for punching the reader in the face, then kicking you in the heart, and you still come out of the experience saying, Can someone read this to me, out loud It s a critique of the modern world, a critique of the future extrapolated from the modern world , a re vamped look at the past, and then another critique of the future Seriously.Oh also It s fantastic Bleak, beautiful, poignant, hopeless, hopeful and definitely not for th As she did in The Passion , Winterson displays her gift for punching the reader in the face, then kicking you in the heart, and you still come out of the experience saying, Can someone read this to me, out loud It s a critique of the modern world, a critique of the future extrapolated from the modern world , a re vamped look at the past, and then another critique of the future Seriously.Oh also It s fantastic Bleak, beautiful, poignant, hopeless, hopeful and definitely not for the faint of heart The bad news If you haven t read Jeanette Winterson yet then your life has been, hitherto, a waste.The good news Not to worry it s not too late There s plenty of her work around and you can get started putting your life in order right away.More good news Her work is short Generally, her books run 150 200 standard sized pages In these days of children s books with five or six times as much verbiage, that s quite brief However, her work isn t a quick read Oh, I m sure you could blow throu The bad news If you haven t read Jeanette Winterson yet then your life has been, hitherto, a waste.The good news Not to worry it s not too late There s plenty of her work around and you can get started putting your life in order right away.More good news Her work is short Generally, her books run 150 200 standard sized pages In these days of children s books with five or six times as much verbiage, that s quite brief However, her work isn t a quick read Oh, I m sure you could blow through it quickly, but it really needs to be read the way one would read poetry That s not only because her work is somewhere between prose and poetry sometimes dipping right into free verse nestled in paragraphs and periods but because her skill with the language is such that it requires reflection and consideration in order to digest properly.Here s a sample of what I mean The new world El Dorado, Atlantis, the Gold Coast, Newfoundland, Plymouth Rock, Rapanaui, Utopia, Planet Blue Chanc d upon, spied through a glass darkly, drunken stories strapped to a barrel of rum, shipwreck, a Bible Compass, a giant fish led us there, a storm whirled us to this isle That s a refrain or one version of it that appears several times in The Stone Gods It s a lovely bit of prosetry prose poetry and I m still mulling through it Variations appear in each of the four parts of the story Individual novellas, perhaps These four parts are widely separated in time and space, mostly differ in characters with a few particularly notable exceptions but directly related in theme That theme Well basically, what she s getting at is that humans shouldn t screw up the environment We re going to, but we should knock it off We ve done it in the past, and we re going to do it again Technology isn t the solution to the problem either Technology just makes it easier for humanity to move on, virus like, to another planet to screw up, and once there we will recreate the same conditions that ruined our home the last time around, assuming we don t manage to screw up the new planet on the way over.Kind of dark, right Well, yeah, but it s not a complete downer There s humor There s a dark, ridiculous core to the madness of human ruination that does not escape Winterson in any way, and she capitalizes on it in her work In fact, the entire book could be read that way an absurdist God s eye view of the suicidal petulance of humanity The humor is wry, to be sure, but there are plenty of smirks and sniggers for those inclined to gallow s humor.The four sections of the book are these Planet Blue is in a futuristic past, where humanity s destruction of its own world, Orbus, means it has to be abandoned for a new world Earth Nope probably not One of the steps betwixt hither and yon in the vast expanse of time Easter Island is in the 18th century when natives on that island are in the midst of destroying their culture, their environment, and themselves and, as humans, they just can t get quite those things together intellectually Post 3War In a future alternate Earth, Blue Planet, 3War World War III went nuclear and the world is now run by a corporate fascistic commercial state called MORE Everything gets a MORE tag MORE Food MORE Commerce Like that Get it Support MORE to getShocking that some corporate marketing wonk hasn t come up with that one by accident already Oh, but the MORE corporation makes AI robots, and in the way of sci fi, robots are better people than people, so corporate techno feudalism can t be all bad, right Wreck City Also on the Blue Planet, but on the other side of the tracks if the tracks are nuclear fallout, that is Resentment, unrest and revolution loom.Throughout the book Winterson references many science fiction standards, and she does so pointedly The subtle reference is itself a process that references any number of literary names In certain lit crit circles references are the height of a writer s art See, for example, the academic fascination with T.S Eliot, whose work is a mosaic of obscure and not so obscure literary references In The Stone Gods there are clear references to science fiction authors like Heinlein and Dick In the above quote, for example, the scanner darkly is a reference to Dick s work, and Dick was referencing a Bible passage, so in the group mind that is the world of literary criticism, Winterson has tagged them, graffiti style, and so now owns them both It doesn t really work that way in the real world, of course, and Winterson is well aware of both the lit crit standard and her own role in it Therefore, her references are done in a cute, subversive way They aren t meant to simply relate to those authors Rather, she reinterprets them in a way that challenges them in the original Her character Friday, for example, is a reference to Heinlein s eponymous character who is a male sexual fantasy sex kitten often wildly misinterpreted as an independent action character, but really is nothingthan a private sexual fantasy presented exhibitionist style Heinlein was the kind of guy who, at a circle jerk, would finish first and yell I win However, Winterson makes her version a man, leader in the anarchistic lower class community, and generally a reversion or inversion of the Heinlein character Picking outof these references could be the subject of a successful grad school thesis Let s just say that the book is rife with them.Further, the stories reference each other, weaving themselves in and out of the consciousness of the POV character in a way that is surprisingly gratifying to the attentive reader I could see how acasual reader might not see those connections, however, meaning the transitions between the sections of the book might be jarring, particularly the transitions into and out of the second section, Easter Island Rather than present that as a criticism of the book, however, I think it really should be seen as an admonishment read carefully But Winterson s real genius is for language She wields words like a painter, and drives character in a way that very few other authors manage in their best work I ll give you an example Here she is describing a boy, one of the victims of the radiation that has ravaged Planet Blue after 3 War A small boy and a small dog, the dog hairless and pink, tongue lolling, body worn thin like hope, the boy with a bad stomach wound sewn up at his home or his hole, subcutaneous fat pushed on the outside like a roll of tripe He had the dog on a lead and he was still managing to be a boy with a dog and the dog was still managing to be a dog with a boy because not even a bomb gets to wipe out everything Youch You can see them there, can t you Where most authors would be fine describing the scene, Winterson gives you that characterization, still managing to be a boy with a dog which turns the horror into something touching and then all thehorrible for it It s a gorgeous little bit of work, and there are manylike it in this book The section describing the planets that had been discovered reads like something Carl Sagan would have wept over She brings to life villagers in a way that anthropologists seem to think they do with their dry, narcissistic studies, but in fact they completely fail Ten words from Winterson are worth a dozen academic culture studies.Overall, what she s getting at is the cyclic nature of human folly Progress means we just fail on a larger scale and at a faster pace Failure also means we start over again,or less from scratch Because of that cycle, this is one of those books that bears a second, a third or a dozen readings because there are levels beneath the levels can only be picked out with time and contemplation, and the references go both forward and backward, so giving it a single analog read won t quite do the trick That means I can t recommend you read this book I can recommend you read itthan once, though In fact, I ll end on Winterson s self referential words about the manuscript of The Stone Gods that appears late in her story in the hands of an old manRead it Leave it for someone else to find The pages are loose it can be written again