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I read this to prepare myself for Szentkuthy s Marginalia on Casanova, which I m currently reading and which will inevitably influence what I write here Obviously, I didn t feel like reading all 12 volumes of Casanova s memoirs, and the library didn t have any abridgements, so here I am Luckily, this story gives a pretty good idea of Casanova s literary character, and, I m guessing, the flavor of his work as a whole Much of the eighteenth century is present ludicrous ideas of personal hono I read this to prepare myself for Szentkuthy s Marginalia on Casanova, which I m currently reading and which will inevitably influence what I write here Obviously, I didn t feel like reading all 12 volumes of Casanova s memoirs, and the library didn t have any abridgements, so here I am Luckily, this story gives a pretty good idea of Casanova s literary character, and, I m guessing, the flavor of his work as a whole Much of the eighteenth century is present ludicrous ideas of personal honor the bizarre combination of deep respect and murderous hatred, which leads doesn t it always to something like friendship highly stylized love the pan European upper class that gets to go wherever it wants and always gets a good welcome the deep divides between that upper class and everyone else and elegance, everywhere you look Otherwise, it s the story of a duel You ve probably read about eight billion of them, so you know how it goes There is blood, there is manliness, there is fortitude, there is bravery There is not, however, any obvious sign as to why Casanova was able to sleep his way through an entire continent He s still well down my list of 18th Century Men I Would Have Sex With [[ Free E-pub ]] ⇛ The Duel ↮ One of the few works written in Casanova s native Italian, The Duel is an important example of the infamous Lothario s vivid prose style Translated for the first time into English, this autobiographical novel describes Casanova s extraordinary battle with a Polish count, while on the run from the Venetian authorities Having escaped from Venice s infamous Piombi Prison, Casanova was forced into exile Far from destitute, however, his reputation gained him entry into European society s highest echelons Yet there, he soon found himself obliged to engage in a duel over a ballerina a lady in whom neither he nor his Polish rival had the slightest interest Recounting the deadly encounter and the surprising events it precipitated with sardonic wit, Casanova creates a work of thrilling adventure and inimitable literary style Giacomo Casanova was an adventurer, a spy, a poet, and a novelist His literary reputation rests on his remarkable History of My Life, which vividly records not only his exploits and adventures but the manners and morals of the day Okay, this is my third attempt to like Casanova s writing, but he s just not for me Interesting tale, but too verbose. This is a story adapted from Casanova s Memoirs for the Art of the Novella series published by Melville House Casanova spins a tale with a very engaging style and well turned plot, which I suppose is to be expected, given his reputation beyond the literary Along the way, he provides pointed asides and ironic comments that draw attention to the hypocrisies and other moral inconsistencies of mid 18th century European high society The qualms that literary critics and literate society in general This is a story adapted from Casanova s Memoirs for the Art of the Novella series published by Melville House Casanova spins a tale with a very engaging style and well turned plot, which I suppose is to be expected, given his reputation beyond the literary Along the way, he provides pointed asides and ironic comments that draw attention to the hypocrisies and other moral inconsistencies of mid 18th century European high society The qualms that literary critics and literate society in general had about the portrayal of his sexual liaisons and other adventures of dubious morality kept his Memoirs from being appreciated as they might have been, but they ought be integrated into the canon to the extent that any exists any of 18th century literature, now that those inhibitions are no longer relevant The second half of this volume includes essays, brief passages, and illustrations that set Casanova and the themes addressed in this story in helpful context and led me to consider different readings of the story SIX WORD REVIEW Duelists respect each other before fight. I ll begin by expressing my astonishment at how few people realize that Giacomo Casanova actually lived and that his adventures and misadventures ran nearly the length of the 18th Century.Yes, he was flesh and blood, and occasionally his acquired aristocratic sang froid turned ice cold a transformation that is at the heart of this slender volume A slender book, but also an excellent introduction to the grand life led by Casanova, Chevalier de Seingalt.Upon finishing THE DUEL, I hope many of y I ll begin by expressing my astonishment at how few people realize that Giacomo Casanova actually lived and that his adventures and misadventures ran nearly the length of the 18th Century.Yes, he was flesh and blood, and occasionally his acquired aristocratic sang froid turned ice cold a transformation that is at the heart of this slender volume A slender book, but also an excellent introduction to the grand life led by Casanova, Chevalier de Seingalt.Upon finishing THE DUEL, I hope many of you will read the excellent 6 volume, unabridged English translation by Willard R Trask When you are done, you ll not only have a solid acquaintanceship with that spectacular century, but with customs of the high and low High meaning the Greats Catherine The Great, Frederick the Great and Stanislaw II Augustus King of Poland at the time of THE DUEL the low tavern whores, con men, fallen aristocrats, and cardsharps and every type in between, all of with whom our Hero was well acquainted.At this point you will not confuse Casanova with the fictional Don Juan Although you will be able to engage in the debate as to whether Casanova helped Lorenzo Da Ponte complete the libretto of Mozart s greatest opera, DON GIOVANNI.I hold a deep affection for the man who I regard as the first modern celebrity Everywhere he went people wanted to meet him simply because he was Casanova This man won such renown and notoriety, he found welcome and patrons wherever he traveled from Rome, to Naples, to France, to Holland and England, and across all the Italian and German states, and on up to Russia, and to Poland, where THE DUEL, takes place He would travel to Spain and Portugal, only to expelled from Spain by the Spanish King, return to Venice, before fleeing again, and ending his days in comfort and punishing boredom, in a kind of purgatory, as librarian to Count Joseph Karl von Waldstein, in the Castle of Dux In was at Dux that Casanova memorialized his own life in his memoirs, HISTOIRE DE MA VIE, The Story of My Life originally composed in French, and it is from this extraordinary work that THE DUEL was excerpted.As mentioned above, this is a small book but a rich one On the surface it tells the story of a quarrel between Casanova and Count Branicki, an officer and favorite of the King It was a quarrel over nothing at all, but one that could only be resolved with a duel The tension arrives chiefly from the fact that dueling was outlawed and punishable by death Nevertheless, place a woman between two men such as Casanova and Branicki, men obsessed with honor, and a duel is inevitable.Casanova is ambivalent He reasons with himself seeking to justify his role in this life and death matter by revisiting Plato s, the Gospels , and Rousseau s thoughts on the subject of Pride and Humility He takes us through this process, which makes forinteresting than compelling reading It is slow going, but that pace is essential for it captures the rhythm of the times and adds to the authenticity underlying the tale.He might have saved himself much trouble if he knew Shakespeare as well as classical and contemporary philosophers Perhaps if he were acquainted with Falstaff s opinion of honor Can honor set to a leg No Or an arm No Or take away the grief of a wound No Honor hath no skill in surgery, then No What is honor A word What is in that word honor What is that honor Air A trim reckoning Who hath it He that died o Wednesday Alas, he was not, which is a wonderful thing, for if he were, he might not have fought this duel, and we would not have the book.In the end, he finds his answer in a simple observation whispered to him by an elderly Polish Prince whose friendship he had cultivated In circumstance as these, an honest man must do much, or nothing at all Nothing ensured the insult would go unanswered and much compelled him to duel The prince s words persuade Casanova and the mechanics of the duel are set in motion The book is largely concerned with the myriad preparations that precede the duel, the duel itself, and its aftermath.Throughout the book, Casanova refers to himself in the third person as The Venetian There is much to be discerned from this, starting with European s perception of Venice as the exotic Republic in an otherwise crown heavy Europe And, although La Serenissima had already sunk into decadence and only a few decades away from having her virtue taken by Napoleon, being The Venetian gave our Hero a certain panache, a panache that Cyrano de Bergerac would be proud to display.In the end, read the book for your amusement, for lessons regarding dueling etiquette, or for your introduction to the marvelous Giacomo Girolamo Casanova, Chevalier de Seingalt A man who defied all conventions and limitations Yes, indeed a great lover of a great many women, but also a man of too many other qualities to list here To learnyou must read his memoirs THE DUEL is a fine first step I had to force myself to read this as 1 I don t like 18th century literature nor 2 am I fond of Italian literature But I had the book and to read something by Casanova felt like a bit of an accomplishment Surprisingly, the story is highly readable and even entertaining A straightforward telling of a situation that a rogue and rascal gets himself into which ends in a duel, it also was highly philosophical and moralising which I found fascinating Glad to say I ve read it. Lightly fictionalized account of Casanova not being able to keep it in his pants and getting into trouble Whoops. I had to stop reading every 3 4 pages so I could write down a new quotation Great stuff here. I have read much of Giacomo Casanova autobiography, and at least one biography The Duel is a lotautobiography than fiction Not a big deal, especially given that he make no effort to separate the un named Venetian, with the initials GC from himself This is a duel he elsewhere says he, himself fought The language is too stylized though consistent with that of his many volume autobiography He always has excuses for himself and few for his opponent This is consistent with his Autobio I have read much of Giacomo Casanova autobiography, and at least one biography The Duel is a lotautobiography than fiction Not a big deal, especially given that he make no effort to separate the un named Venetian, with the initials GC from himself This is a duel he elsewhere says he, himself fought The language is too stylized though consistent with that of his many volume autobiography He always has excuses for himself and few for his opponent This is consistent with his Autobio By itself The Duel is not much of a story There is room forwit and less self praise That Casanova can be a huge egotist should come as no surprise I had hoped forof his wit and ingenuity This being intended as fiction he could have used some imagination The Duel is a reasonable intro to Giacomo Casanova, but it is not likely to convince you to dive into the unedited many volume work from which this is taken.While staying in Poland, and we cannot know why he is in Poland or what he travels so much Casanova had a habit of schemes, frauds and seductions that tended to make of him a travelling man Our narrator is a Venetian gentleman, initials GC, but otherwise unidentified, who gains in favor with the local king He also falls in with the ladies of the local theater.In his version he is mostly interested in the actress Anna Benetti who leads one camp of followers in rivalry with the followers of Teresa Casacci Out of this GC find himself faced with a duel He expresses no particular preference for either actress or any special desire to fight over them However he feels keenly that a failure to fight will cost him his standing at court, and perhaps cause him to seek out honest work.Along the way there are some witty and keenly edged comments about courtly survival GC , real or imagined is a survivor and a conniver Both real and fictional GCs are men of great taste and insight into what is jewels and what is paste Forever the man on the make.Like the author, GC is a hero in the tradition of the stylish rogue Impeccable, unruffled and always thinking on the next prospect Casanova was one of the early in this tradition and should appeal to those so inclined