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READ PDF À Memórias póstumas de Brás Cubas ⚠ A publica o de Mem rias p stumas de Br s Cubas n o s inaugura o Realismo no Brasil, como inicia a etapa mais complexa da obra de Machado de Assis Com ela, aprofunda se a sua an lise da realidade e refina se a sua linguagem, sendo considerada a obra que prenuncia algumas t cnicas da literatura moderna Strangely fascinating I am no expert in literature and only started reading serious fiction works a couple of years back in my quest to read all those works included in 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die by Dr Boxall.Therefore, at first, I did not know how to react to this kind of literary work Some say it is a novel but the author, the Brazilian Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis 1839 1908 says that is is a memoir However, a memoir is supposed to be fiction But how could this be ficti Strangely fascinating I am no expert in literature and only started reading serious fiction works a couple of years back in my quest to read all those works included in 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die by Dr Boxall.Therefore, at first, I did not know how to react to this kind of literary work Some say it is a novel but the author, the Brazilian Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis 1839 1908 says that is is a memoir However, a memoir is supposed to be fiction But how could this be fiction if it was written by the protagonist, the Brazilian rich and indolent Bras Cubas after his death Dead people cannot write a novel unless they can talk to a writer who will, in trance, tinker what they say on his keyboard for many, many creepy nights De Assis made use of a dead narrator, Bras Cubas, so that he De Assis will have a freedom to say what he wants to say, free from the responsibilities of the living Death offers him the indolence of eternity p 209 The fact of being already deceased allows Br s Cubas to sharply criticize the Brazilian society and reflect on his own disillusionment, with no sign of remorse or fear of retaliationp.52 But in death, what a difference What a release What freedom Oh, how people can shake off their coverings, leave their spangles in the gutter, unbutton themselves, undecorate themselves, confess flatly what they were and what they ve stopped being Because, in short, there aren t any neighbors or friends or enemies or acquintances or strangers There s noaudience The gaze of public opinions, that sharp and judgmental gaze, losses its virtue the moment we tread the territory of death I m not saying that it doesn t reach here and examine and judge us, but we don t care about the examination or judgment My dear living gentlemen and ladies, there s nothing as incommensurable as the disdain of the deceased This however, is not an original idea De Assis himself admitted that this style of freewheeling narrative was inspired by Laurence Sterne 1713 1768 particularly the latter s The Life and Opinions of Tristam Shandy The Afterword of the edition The Library of Latin American series I have says that the De Assis s generation of Brazilian writers were greatly influenced by French earlier masters This was during the middle 19th century when Brazil veered away from Portugal that was their main ally and greatly influenced their country prior to its opening to European countries.The setting is in Rio de Janeiro, during that period, i.e., mid 19th century The novel opens with the actual interment of tne 64 y o Bras Cubas who ironically died of pneumonia after discovering an antihypochodriacal poultice medicine He started to tell his tale from childhood, through his series of failed love affairs, his attempt to become a politician, etc up to his eventual death.The book is divided into several short erratic chapters shifting in tone and style My favorite is XXXI entitled The Black Butterfuly The scene is after the death of Bras Cubas s mother and he was visited by a black butterfly Bras is not superstitious so he strikes the poor butterfly with a towel while on top of his father s portrait with a towel In the Philippines, we all believe that a butterfly or even a dragonfly, in whatever color, appearing after the death of a loved one is actually the soul of that person I remember that a brown dragonfly stayed on the windshield of my car few days after the death of my father in September 1997 That dragonfly stayed there on top of my sideview mirror while I was traversing the lenght of the South Expressway SLEX not minding the strong wind and dusts The unique use of erratic chapters shifting in tone and style in this realist novel that also uses surreal devices of metaphor and playful narrative construction source Wiki , at times can also be confusing What is funny is that De Assis anticipated this by including a short chapter LXXI entitled The Defect of this BookI m beginning to regret this book Not that it bores me, I have nothing to do and, really, putting together a few meager chapters for that other world is always a task that distracts me from eternity a little But the book is tedious, it has the smell of grave about it it has a certain cadeveric contraction about it, a serious fault, insignificant to boot because the main defect of this book is you, reader You re in a hurry to grow old and the book moves slowly You love direct and continuous narration, a regular and fluid style, and this book and my style are like drunkards, they stagger left and right, they walk and stop, mumble, yell, cackle, shake their fists at the sky, stumble, and fallAnd they do fall Miserable leaves of cypress of death, you shall fall like any others, beautiful and brilliant as you are And, if I had eyes, I would shed a nostalgic tear for you This is the great adventure of death, which if it leaves no mouth with which to laugh, neither does it leave eyes with which to weep You shall failIf you don t find those lines strangely fascinating, I don t know what lines in any other book would have that impact to you.My edition of this book was published by The Library of Latin America Their series of books makes available in translation major nineteen century authors whose work has been neglected in the English speaking world.I am thankful to The Library of Latin America for bringing De Assis available to English only readers like me I look forward to knowingobscure Latin American writers like the brilliant Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis Saludos, Senor De Assis a sick chicken and the voluptuousness of miseryhow is this genius is not known at the top of the literary canon only a species as cretinous as ours could ignore machado along with carpentier and mutis, he takes the top what the fuck spot top three reasons why machado must be read 1 1880 18fucking80 madman machado wrote a modernist masterpiece way back when gotdamn, he makes joyce look like a late Bloomer in this hysterical and darkdarkdark nuthouse you get the narrator s crazy drawing a sick chicken and the voluptuousness of miseryhow is this genius is not known at the top of the literary canon only a species as cretinous as ours could ignore machado along with carpentier and mutis, he takes the top what the fuck spot top three reasons why machado must be read 1 1880 18fucking80 madman machado wrote a modernist masterpiece way back when gotdamn, he makes joyce look like a late Bloomer in this hysterical and darkdarkdark nuthouse you get the narrator s crazy drawings i ripped out the pages and stuck em on the wall next to my desk , made up words, demented philosophical systems, aphorisms, chapters that describe their own uselessness, chapters asking to be inserted within the text of other chapters, and wonderful sections in which the narrator commands us to disregard the text, that he s full of shit, that he s overwritten something to make it soundliterary yeah check out the entirety of chapter 45 Sobs, tears, an improvised altar with saints and crucifix, black curtains on the walls, strips of black velvet framing an entrance, a man who came to dress the corpse, another man who took the measurements for the coffin candelabra, the coffin on a table covered with gold and black silk with candles at the corners, invitations, guests who entered slowly with muffled step and pressed the hand of each member of the family, some of them sad, all of them serious and silent, priest, sacristan, prayers, sprinkling of holy water, the closing of the coffin with hammer and nails six persons who removes the coffin from the table, lift it, carry it, with difficulty, down the stairs despite the cries, sobs, and new tears of the family, walk with it to the hearse, place it on the slab, strap it securely with leather thongs the rolling of the hearse, the rolling of the carriages one by one These are the notes that I took for a sad and commonplace chapter which I shall not write 2 because i don t go to books for comedy, i don t laugh from books, i don t want to laugh from books but this nuthouse salman rushdie on machado the kind of humor that makes skulls smile check this fuckfest of humor and tragedy Tis good to be sad and say nothing I remember that I was sitting under a tamarind tree, with the poet s book open in my hands and my spirit as crestfallen as a sick chicken I pressed my silent grief to my breast and experienced a curious feeling, something that might be called the voluptuousness of misery Voluptuousness of misery Memorize the phrase, reader store it away, take it out and study it from time to time, and, if you do not succeed in understanding it, you may conclude that you have missed one of the most subtle emotions of which man is capable 3 susan sontag karen brissette two tough chickens, one dead one alive, who push the shit outta machado woody allen is a machado fan as is carlos fuentes, salman rushdie, javier marias, and harold bloom and sontag s introduction is, as always, a must read she makes the point that latin america produced such far seeing and interesting literature not merely because the dictatorships tyrannies and repressive regimes produced a literature of pressure , but because the latin americans were those who were most enad by laurence sterne damn i ve really gotta read tristam shandy.enough said you know what to do Do not mourn the dead They know what they are doing Clarice Lispector, The Hour of the StarWith those lines, Lispector might have introduced this novel by her countryman Told from the other side of the grave, we learn of the narrator s small successes and small failures, ultimately balanced in the totality of things Braz Cubas, the narrator, provides his autobiography, and his philosophy, with a gentle humor in a novel which anticipates the best of meta fiction, breaking with a Romantic Do not mourn the dead They know what they are doing Clarice Lispector, The Hour of the StarWith those lines, Lispector might have introduced this novel by her countryman Told from the other side of the grave, we learn of the narrator s small successes and small failures, ultimately balanced in the totality of things Braz Cubas, the narrator, provides his autobiography, and his philosophy, with a gentle humor in a novel which anticipates the best of meta fiction, breaking with a Romantic literary tradition in South America and leaping into a Realism that feels contemporary Come, my great lecher, the voluptuousness of extinction awaits you Braz Cubas describes his romances and political aspirations with a detachment The sharp and judicial eye of public opinion loses its power as soon as we enter the territory of death I do not deny that it sometimes glances this way and examines and judges us, but we dead folk are not concerned about its judgment You who still live, believe me, there is nothing in the world so monstrously vast as our indifference He constantly cajoles and engages the reader Tis good to be sad and say nothing When I read these words of Shakespeare, I felt within me an echo, a delicious echo I remember sitting under a tamarind tree, with the poet s book open in my hands and my spirit as crestfallen as a sick chicken I pressed my silent grief to my breast and experienced a curious feeling, something that might be called the voluptuousness of misery Voluptuousness of misery Memorize this phrase, reader store it away, take it out and study it from time to time, and, if you do not succeed in understanding it, you may conclude you have missed one of the most subtle emotions of which man is capable He likens life to the constant revision of a book Let Pascal say man is a thinking reed He is wrong man is a thinking erratum Each period in life is a new edition that corrects the preceding one and that in turn will be corrected by the next, until publication of the definitive edition, which the publisher donates to the worms.He encourages the slow reading, the consideration of his text by direct challenge I am beginning to be sorry that I ever undertook to write this book Not that it bores me I have nothing else to do indeed, it is a welcome distraction to eternity But the book is tedious, it smells of the tomb, it has a rigor mortis about it a serious fault, a yet a relatively small one, for the great defect of this book is you, reader And the slow reading, the thoughtful consideration pays off Language Camaraderie with the narrator unreliable, and frequently unlikeable, as he is wins us over A constant source for highlighting and reflection The best way to not be the great defect is to read this one as the narrator reads himself Savory Imagine, if you will, this title said aloud, with an accent of one type or another do you hear, Epitaph for a Small Weiner I feel a certain amount of shame mentioning this, however the narrator does , on several occasions, express concern over his small sword while Napoleon had a large sword Just something to think about, but not for all that long this book is written with apathy, with the apathy of a man now freed of the brevity of the century, a supinely philosophical work, of an unequal philosophy, now austere, now playful, something that neither builds nor destroys, neither inflames nor cools, and, yet, it isthan a pastime and less than an apostolate.My Goodreads morning started on an emotional note today I logged in and found a book recommendation by Ali, friendly comments from Dolors and Dustin, the surprised mention of mthis book is written with apathy, with the apathy of a man now freed of the brevity of the century, a supinely philosophical work, of an unequal philosophy, now austere, now playful, something that neither builds nor destroys, neither inflames nor cools, and, yet, it isthan a pastime and less than an apostolate.My Goodreads morning started on an emotional note today I logged in and found a book recommendation by Ali, friendly comments from Dolors and Dustin, the surprised mention of my name in Manny s review and lovely messages in the inbox Whatcould I have asked for The update feed however, presented a different and grim story altogether A chilling reminder about the unfavorable direction this site is heading towards A site which is of, by and for the readers Good readers, Great readers, readers without whose recommendations and reviews, I wouldn t be the reader, I m today Emotions surged up when I started imagining the what ifs scenarios and when you dedicate a huge chunk of your time to a virtual world, the happenings in that world whether positive or negative, affects you in incommensurable proportions It s affecting me too and I would like to extend my heartiest thanks to each and everyone who are raising their voice in protest and hope that whatever happens the good reader in you will persevere and find blissful solace in wonderful books.May I recommend The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas Death is inevitable and melancholy is alright but what fun to have an everlasting smile pasted on your face while reading a book Bras Cubas is dead but gifted us all these wonderful posthumous memoirs Why Posthumous Probably our narrator, a supposed alter ego of our author was seeking a full fledged creative freedom and wanted to break all the rules of writing that must be in practice during his time The year was 1880 and Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis gave us this enchanting literary treat which surely holds the power to fascinate everyone of us in the present world of countless genres and sub genresHe had no other philosophy Nor did I I m not saying that the university hadn t taught me some philosophical truths But I d only memorized the formulas, the vocabulary, the skeleton I treated them as I had Latin I put three lines from Virgil in my pocket, two from Horace, and a dozen moral and political locutions for the needs of conversation I treated them the way I treated history and jurisprudence I picked up the phraseology of all things, the shell, the decorationThe truth in his humor, the irony in his innocent expressions and the wisdom in his reckless way of living life while he lived , will make you instantly fall in love with Cubas He s not perfect but he s perfectly human The writer in him finds a way of telling us his witty intentions without sticking to conventions as apparent in the following quotesWhat looks like a simple inventory here are notes I d taken for a sad and banal chapter that I won t write.I found in her a certain ethereal softness wedded to the polish of earthly forms a vague expression and worthy of a chapter in which everything must be vague.Few tears, lots of laughs and random sighs the life viewed from the other side of the grave is not sieved through the judgmental eyes of the people around us but comes across in an unadulterated form consists of memories collected, mistakes committed and admissions of guilt in the confession box of our hearts and in retrospect, the life appears to be beautiful Cubas tells us that and that s what we should tell ourselves while we are livingBelieve me, remembering is the least evil No one should trust present happiness, there s a drop of Cain s drivel in it With the passing of time and the end of rapture, then, yes, then perhaps it s possible really to enjoy, because between these two illusions the better one is the one that s enjoyed without pain.