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It s hard to say what s so great about Goethe One could list all the arts and sciences that he contributed to, but looking honestly at those contributions, none seems to have really remained of fruitful interest to our time, at least not here in the US Perhaps the way his influence is currently most felt here is through Waldorf schools, which are based on Rudolph Steiner s theories, which were elaborations of Goethe s But while Waldorf schools seem to do a great job of helping kids turn into It s hard to say what s so great about Goethe One could list all the arts and sciences that he contributed to, but looking honestly at those contributions, none seems to have really remained of fruitful interest to our time, at least not here in the US Perhaps the way his influence is currently most felt here is through Waldorf schools, which are based on Rudolph Steiner s theories, which were elaborations of Goethe s But while Waldorf schools seem to do a great job of helping kids turn into good human beings, one can t say they re a major cultural force Faust I rarely see references to it selling one s soul to the devil in exchange for pleasure isn t of much concern to a culture that tends to confound pleasure with nearness to God Goethe himself believed that his theories about color would be of most lasting value to the world, but these theories seem to be simply irrelevant nowadays, though curiously not disproved And yet Goethe was a great man This will be as clear as a vast and cloudless sky to anyone who reads the conversations that he had with, and that were diligently recorded by, his protege and friend, Johann Eckermann The first sign of Goethe s greatness is his enormous capacity to love and attentively notice the works and people whom he perceives as excellent Goethe pays homage to writers Schiller, Lord Byron, Voltaire, many others , visual artists most of whom aren t well known now , statesmen the local Duke whom he loved and served, and, bafflingly but especially, Napoleon , and scientists Humboldt, others Goethe is sharp in rebuking anyone who suggests that he is, or that anyone but a thoroughly crazy and defective artist could be, free from influences, i.e a self made man Goethe strongly asserts that every act is the result of many influences, and the finer the act the finer the art , therichly and deeply was it influenced The finest act the finest art is indeed hardly attributable to the person who did made it at all, but rather becomes an expression of something superhuman, which he calls the daemonic spirit This is all discussed with enormous playfulness, geniality, and modesty, the second, third, and fourth signs of Goethe s greatness Also there are lots of contradictions here in Goethe s thinking, which he is aware of but doesn t seem to mind terribly sign of greatness 5 The sixth sign of Goethe s greatness is his belief in what must be called, for lack of aprecise word, magic It seems that Goethe didn t commit to any particular religion, nor did he make up one of his own, yet he certainly wasn t a materialist I think he didn t see a reason to codify, or even to discuss at any length, what for him was a living experience He simply took pleasure in his sense of the divine in nature and rejoiced in others ability to do so too Thankfully, this divine in nature never becomes overwrought or forced, but always feels quite simple and even somewhat peculiar, as it should, given the differences between the land from which he arose and that of most readers The seventh sign of Goethe s greatness is that he could become hilariously surly when discussing his detractors, but he preferred, and usually attained, serenity I especially enjoyed his comments when asked why he didn t help defend Germany during the Napoleonic wars This is clearly a sour subject for Goethe, but he doesn t try to weasel out of it He says that he didthan enough for his country by writing great poems, and that, further, a great poet like himself is a citizen of the world so can bear no enmity toward other nations, especially a nation as cultured as France This surely unpopular explanation for his pacifism is actually scoffed at in an editorial footnote in my edition of Conversations and might still be controversial today Also relevant to today are Goethe s criteria for judging art, though we would apply to movies his thoughts about theater and to pop music his thoughts about poetry Goethe again with many contradictions loved what was excellent, genuine, and uplifting He was the first to distinguish classical and romantic art I call the classic healthy, and the romantic sickly Most modern productions are romantic not because they are new, but because they are weak, morbid, and sickly And the antique is classic, not because it is old, but because it is strong, fresh, joyous, and healthy But later Classic and romanticare equally good the only point is to use these forms with judgment, and to be capable of excellence you can be absurd in both, and then one is as worthless as the other Eighth sign of greatness developed this fascinating trope but was unenslaved by it So there are my eight signs of Goethe s greatness I m sure aperceptive reader could add to the list Conversations with Goethe is worth the occasional minor eye glaze caused by many references to people most of us won t have heard of It s a lively encounter with a great man in the last year of his long, deep life Perhaps his views will see a resurgence in popularity someday That would not be a bad thing for any of us If you are interested in the history and culture of Goethe s time 1749 1832 , as I am, this is well worth reading Having read some of Goethe s works it was interesting to find out about his plans, intentions and influences.What does make this an occasionally uncomfortable read is the very uneven relationship between Eckermann and Goethe After having known each other for three months, having spent most of that time apart and not communicating, Goethe asks Eckermann to stay in Weimar, not just If you are interested in the history and culture of Goethe s time 1749 1832 , as I am, this is well worth reading Having read some of Goethe s works it was interesting to find out about his plans, intentions and influences.What does make this an occasionally uncomfortable read is the very uneven relationship between Eckermann and Goethe After having known each other for three months, having spent most of that time apart and not communicating, Goethe asks Eckermann to stay in Weimar, not just for a while but for his whole life And Eckermann accepts because as long as he can have Goethe he ll be happy.Goethe continues to tell Eckermann what he should and shouldn t do and Eckermann continues to idolize Goethe and fail to see even one tiny flaw in him They don t ever come close to connecting as equals Also despite Eckermann s effort to portray Goethe in the most flattering light possible, Goethe comes across as quite conceited and full of himself at times Na njemu se videlo da se odmara u samom sebi i da se izdigao iznad pohvale i pokude Tako da je i svako zvezdi anje sa moje strane nesuvislo i bespredmetno. Free download available at Project Gutenberg Free download available at Project Gutenberg Goethe hated spectacles so much that he went out of his way not to speak to bespectacled people Also, you know Harold Bloom s theory of the anxiety of influence What about Thomas Kuhn s theory of the structure of scientific revolutions Yep Goethe came up with both of those and they re right here in this book Eckermann faz um trabalho not vel ao nos mostrar Goethe com toda a riqueza e complexidade da personalidade do pr ncipe da poesia alem um mergulho nos pensamentos, id ias e opini es de um dos grandes escritores do Ocidente Mas, mais do que um escritor, Goethe era um s bio, um homem que conheceu profundamente as pessoas e o mundo ao seu redor, e que, mesmo nos ltimos anos de vida, estava sempre aprendendo, sempre buscando compreender, de maneira sens vel e inteligente, as quest es que lhe er Eckermann faz um trabalho not vel ao nos mostrar Goethe com toda a riqueza e complexidade da personalidade do pr ncipe da poesia alem um mergulho nos pensamentos, id ias e opini es de um dos grandes escritores do Ocidente Mas, mais do que um escritor, Goethe era um s bio, um homem que conheceu profundamente as pessoas e o mundo ao seu redor, e que, mesmo nos ltimos anos de vida, estava sempre aprendendo, sempre buscando compreender, de maneira sens vel e inteligente, as quest es que lhe eram postas Era um d namo, uma for a viva da natureza, que espraiou sua influ ncia sobre as mais diversas pessoas nos mais diversos recantos da Europa Uma das maiores personalidades de artista de todos os tempos, sen o a maior Goethe merece todas as nossas homenagens e sincera admira o |FREE EBOOK ⚑ Conversations of Goethe ♷ Conversations Of Goethe Eckermann, JohannNowhere else can one encounter apenetrating, many sided, and personal Goethe than in the extraordinary Conversationsby Johann Peter Eckermann , a German author and scholar as well as Goethe s friend, archivist, and editor Although only thirty one when first meeting the seventy four year old literary giant, Eckermann quickly devoted himself to assisting Goethe during hisConversations of Goethe With Eckermann andNotRetrouvez Conversations of Goethe With Eckermann and Soret et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion Conversations avec Goethe Wikipdia Conversations avec Goethe allemand Gesprche mit Goethe in den letzen Jahren seines Lebens est un ouvrage de Johann Peter Eckermann rapportant ses entretiens avec Johann Wolfgang von Goethe durant les neuf dernires annes de la vie de l crivain tandis que Eckerman lui servait de secrtaire personnel Conversations of Goethe by Johann Peter Eckermann This is the book Nietzsche called the best book in the German language, the Conversations with Goethe of Eckermann, three books that Eckermann compiled from notes and diaries detailing their almost daily discussions during the last few years of Goethe s life For me, the first two books out of three are too direct, too fawning, Eckermann was clearly loving Goethe, and some of that feeling is reciprocated PDF Conversations Of Goethe Download Full Nowhere else can one encounter apenetrating, many sided, and personal Goethe than in the extraordinary Conversationsby Johann Peter Eckermann , a German author and scholar as well as Goethe s friend, archivist, and editor Although only thirty one when first meeting the seventy four year old literary giant, Eckermann quickly devoted himself to assisting Goethe during his Conversations of Goethe with Johann Peter Nowhere else can one encounter apenetrating, many sided, and personal Goethe than in the extraordinary Conversationsby Johann Peter Eckermann , a German author and scholar as well as Goethe s friend, archivist, and editor Although only thirty one when first meeting the seventy four year old literary giant, Eckermann quickly devoted himself to assisting Goethe during his Gesprche mit Goethe Wikipedia Goethe was one of the most famous and greatest writers who ever lived and this incredible book is an insight into his life and thoughts at an old age, one where he was nonetheless fully aware and writing the second part of Faust The book contains the memories of conversations between Goethe and Eckermann, who was assisting him in various ways with his legacy In the book, Goethe discusses a wide variety of topics from literature to science, and comes across as probably the most elevated and cul Goethe was one of the most famous and greatest writers who ever lived and this incredible book is an insight into his life and thoughts at an old age, one where he was nonetheless fully aware and writing the second part of Faust The book contains the memories of conversations between Goethe and Eckermann, who was assisting him in various ways with his legacy In the book, Goethe discusses a wide variety of topics from literature to science, and comes across as probably the most elevated and cultured person whom I have ever encountered.Virtually every page is filled with Goethe s insight and genius, which is of the highest order to use a phrase perhaps he would use It s hard to say exactly what my favorite parts were, his comments on other authors are always brilliant, his advice to other writers, his comments on his prior works, his discussions about science and his theories of color, but perhaps most remarkable was his discussion of his ongoing progress on the second part of Faust, which took him six years to write I also particularly liked the various excursions he took with Eckermann, whether to neighboring towns or up into the mountains It also portrays this incredible literary world which frankly filled me with pangs of jealousy, particularly the various homages he receives from other artists, most notable a chest full of literary goodies from the great artist David in France The various Ambassadors and German royalty that visit, as well as other famous writers and artists, and the dinner parties and concert parties they hold, describe a world that seems unfathomable in its richness The near constant discussion of theater which has odd similarities to how we talk about movies is also fascinating and his advice to dramatists as well as poets should also be considered.Concepts such as elevated and cultured and highest order have been shot down in our modernist era, and yet here you have Goethe, one of the greatest writers of all time, describing literature and the world in that sense I felt while reading this that this moment in time and place was the true pinnacle of civilization and everything has been downhill since like some would say classical music after Beethoven Sometimes the book made me realize just how human great artists are, and yet other parts were so rich and profound I felt this enormous gulf between myself and Goethe.I recommend this book for anyone, especially writers of any sort and people involved in the theater I would recommend reading both parts of Faust and probably some of his other works beforehand I had only read Wilhelm Meister, but The Sorrows of Young Werther is mentioned frequently, as are many of his poems, dramas Tasso and Iphigenia and other works You might want to read some Schiller as well, Robbers in particular Lord Byron is a big favorite of Goethe He says a truly cultured person has read the Greeks, and some of the Romans, and Shakespeare and Moliere.This was a great book to read towards the end of the Powys project Goethe is truly a giant and Faust is part of Columbia s core curriculum, although it wasn t when I was there He had a wide range of interests from literature in all its forms poetry, drama and novels and science he was a well known botanist and was interested in the science of colors The book had a lot of personal meaning for me he was someone who I truly admire and hope to emulate in the remainder of my life Having such a direct insight into someone so brilliant and incredible is a treat Boswell s Life of Johnson is not quite at the same level , how rare it is that we get to sit at the table of the Muses, and hear what they have to say and think I am possibly in agreement with Nietzsche that this is the greatest book ever published in the German language I say this for a number of reasons 1 German is the language of the Bildungsroman, and how could there be any better Bildung than one conducted by Goethe himself 2 On the flip side of this equation, Eckermann s worship of Goethe produces a master student relationship unlike anything else in Western literature The pure positivity emanating from this book is a source of boundless creat I am possibly in agreement with Nietzsche that this is the greatest book ever published in the German language I say this for a number of reasons 1 German is the language of the Bildungsroman, and how could there be any better Bildung than one conducted by Goethe himself 2 On the flip side of this equation, Eckermann s worship of Goethe produces a master student relationship unlike anything else in Western literature The pure positivity emanating from this book is a source of boundless creative energy.3 It is a masterpiece of aesthetics, as it is not merely the work of a single aesthete offering opinions, nor of two aesthetes debating, but of a combination of inspired conversation and hard contemplation Eckermann seriously believes in this stuff, and through his seriousness he convinces you to believe in it too.4 Compared to German classics like The Magic Mountain which are unspeakably deep but also grandiloquent, this is a book that speaks to the novice and the expert alike It introduces you to the idea of Germany and Europe through straightforward table talk, while digging in as deep as any historian of thought would be willing to go.Some of what Goethe says is actually absurd or self contradictory, but when he is not contradicting himself he is offering brilliant insights In a single evening of chatting with Eckermann, Goethe prophesied that America would build the Panama Canal, England would come to own the Suez Canal, and Germany would eventually have a Rhine Danube canal On another evening, he transformed the concept of occasional poetry, from an act performed in court for a patron to a tribute to the ultimate patron, Nature He performs these daily marvels with joy and cheer It is a book you can drink from like a well This is the book Nietzsche called the best book in the German language, the Conversations with Goethe of Eckermann, three books that Eckermann compiled from notes and diaries detailing their almost daily discussions during the last few years of Goethe s life For me, the first two books out of three are too direct, too fawning, Eckermann was clearly loving Goethe, and some of that feeling is reciprocated Goethe complains about how some contemporary writer is bad in this or that way, then Eckerm This is the book Nietzsche called the best book in the German language, the Conversations with Goethe of Eckermann, three books that Eckermann compiled from notes and diaries detailing their almost daily discussions during the last few years of Goethe s life For me, the first two books out of three are too direct, too fawning, Eckermann was clearly loving Goethe, and some of that feeling is reciprocated Goethe complains about how some contemporary writer is bad in this or that way, then Eckermann comes up with an example of how Goethe did that thing much better in one of his plays, and then both vehemently agree for a page or two.You have to see it this way a young, self taught guy from a poor background who has never finished any schooling or higher degree, who yearns for a career in the arts meets a famous man at the end of his life, a man whose time in the mainstream is over, who is maybe yearning for some attention from the younger German generations The third book is much better, written a few years after Goethe s death, there sdistance between Eckermann and Goethe which leads to a cooler description of what was going on The first two books spend so much time on Eckermann and Goethe agreeing that I m surprised there s no slash fiction out there.Some notes Goethe s theory of color keeps on appearing over and over again tl dr light doesn t consist of all colors, but colors appear when darkness and light mix Goethe was very angry that the crowning achievement of his life was being ignored by the mainstream There are some fun implications for philosophy of science, and general crank ism in there A good theory doesn t explain phenomena, it predicts them when Goethe s theory s predictions failed, he explained these failures away by saying that the eye is subjective, it wants to see what it sees Only a few pages later he complains about how no one wants to let go of Newton s theory of color, but he couldn t do that with his own theory Goethe Kunstwerk des Lebens states that Goethe was gifted a prism which would have dispelled his theory, but there s not a word about it here The other scientific research, for example into the metamorphosis of plants, worked out better his methods and concepts like homology vs analogy are still in use It s interesting how often Lord Byron appears nowadays probablyknown as the father of Ada Lovelace, one of the pioneers of computing Goethe was immensely impressed with Byron, and he discusses Byron s successes and failures over and over again, the most discussed artist here Schiller appears often too, for obvious reasons I was easily lost in discussions between Eckermann and Goethe about their contemporary literature, much of which has been forgotten have you ever read anything by August Hagen Or August von Kotzebue, Friedrich August Wolf, Johann Gottfried Herder, St Sch tze and many similar ones Me neither You get a making of of Faust 2, which Goethe finished with Eckermann s help in the last few years of his life, including some insights into what Goethe thought about certain elements of the play there s no specific symbolism behind the names of the characters Baucis and Philemon, just that their situation is vaguely similar to the characters in Ovid s writing , or how much Goethe owed to the Greeks, he kept on returning to Greek drama his entire life It s also interesting how extremely confident Goethe was Sometimes, that worked out immensely in his favor, you can t just write that many poems, plays, novels, and publish in several sciences without believing in what you re doing In other times it didn t help it doesn t look like he could admit errors theory of colors, again I wish I could be this much into my own work lots and lots of interesting thoughts on arts, and on his work, the role of Germany, too much to fit in here Goethe spent his whole life trying to perfect his life, his outlook and his personality, this gave me the first insight into why he s such a revered personality in Germany, and why Nietzsche loved him so much Goethe was someone who never stopped improving himself Goethe s personal philosophy of life and religion still has a lot to offer.Anyway, once you get past all the fawning there are some extremely interesting thoughts and concept to be found here, and I really got to understand why Goethe is still such a towering figure in German culture