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What a huge I emphasize it HUGE disappointment The Reprieve 1946 is A terrible experience but, by now, I know Jean Paul Sartre is hit or miss In The Age of Reason 1946 part one of a planned tetrology called The Ways of Freedom Sartre used the lives of handful of people to explore his extentialist philosophy in practice He described the lives of these people during two days in the hot summer of 1938 Each chapter or distinct part within a chapter centres around one person and What a huge I emphasize it HUGE disappointment The Reprieve 1946 is A terrible experience but, by now, I know Jean Paul Sartre is hit or miss In The Age of Reason 1946 part one of a planned tetrology called The Ways of Freedom Sartre used the lives of handful of people to explore his extentialist philosophy in practice He described the lives of these people during two days in the hot summer of 1938 Each chapter or distinct part within a chapter centres around one person and the reader gets to know the inner thoughts, moods, experiences and decisions of the person involved All stories are interwoven into one great narrative which centres around Mathieu Delarue, a 35 year old philosophy teacher at a Lyc e, living a bohemian life out of resentment towards the bourgeois lifestyle, and who tries to come up with 4000 francs to pay for the abortion of his long time girlfriend Marcelle But how different is The Reprieve Gone are the personal stories, the existentialist perceptions of the characters involved, the narratives within a narrative Sartre throws all this out in order to cover ahistorical story the week in september 1938 when Hitler was on the verge of invading Czechoslovakia, dragging France and with this Europe into another World War, and British PM Chamberlain flew to Munich to try to come up with some sort of peaceful solution Theoretically, this is a majestic setting for a novel, especially when it is tied to existentialist themes, emphasizing the pluarity of perspectives involved What went wrong Well, already from the first sentence we can read how Sartre attacked this target from a whole new angle He now includes manycharacters, switches the perspetive and narrative in one or two sentences at a time, and connects seemingly unconnected persons, locations and events The result is a totally different book, in all possible ways of being different And it s not simply different it is barely readable Beingthan 1 3 in the book, I still couldn t make out what I was reading, which story connects to which character, and vice versa No, I feel no impulse to reading on I am not just disappointed after finding The Age of Reason kind of majestic , I am unable to understand and follow this book A shame but I guess disappointments like these makes you appreciate the rewarding books even , so I ll rather stick with my memories of The Age of Reason I guess I m trying to imagine what it would have been like to have been a left leaning French intellectual in 1939 You re used to defending Stalin on the grounds that he s at least against Hitler Then he suddenly goes and forms an alliance with him Sartre does his best to convey how this felt, as does de Beauvoir in the second volume of her memoirs But I still can t really grasp it Oh well I m trying to imagine what it would have been like to have been a left leaning French intellectual in 1939 You re used to defending Stalin on the grounds that he s at least against Hitler Then he suddenly goes and forms an alliance with him Sartre does his best to convey how this felt, as does de Beauvoir in the second volume of her memoirs But I still can t really grasp it Oh well The attraction of reading the RTF trilogy for me comes from one of the clearest television memories I have easily rivalling some of the scenes from Quatermas and the Pit It comes from the acclaimed 1970 BBC dramatisation which, for thirteen weeks, had engaged millions of British viewers in Mathieu Delarue s efforts to define the scope of freedom in a France that was stumbling into world war.The scene dealt with Mathieu s lonely night time walk through a Paris that expected to be told at any m The attraction of reading the RTF trilogy for me comes from one of the clearest television memories I have easily rivalling some of the scenes from Quatermas and the Pit It comes from the acclaimed 1970 BBC dramatisation which, for thirteen weeks, had engaged millions of British viewers in Mathieu Delarue s efforts to define the scope of freedom in a France that was stumbling into world war.The scene dealt with Mathieu s lonely night time walk through a Paris that expected to be told at any moment that France was going to war in order to save Czechoslovakia from dismemberment The philosophy professor crosses Pont Neuf and his inner voice narrates his personal plight The entirety of his world is a permanent moment in which he exists like light gliding over the surface of stones and water In this condition he is ungraspable by the substances he passes over, never to be absorbed by the world which is outside him Freedom is exile, and I am condemned to be free, he grimly deduces from this intuition, and his attention moves to consider the condition of his own body, with his own hands appearing to him as parts of the external world from which is profoundly apart.For a moment he plays with this idea by leaning his body across the bridge, saved from plunging into the Seine only by these hands grasping a ledge Will he live or die He has reasoned that he is in a position of powerlessness with regard to the external world, and his hands are a part of the world of stones and water rather than his own consciousness Yet he asserts the will to live His hands take a firmer grip on the ledge and haul him back to safety, albeit a meagre sort given that the world is about to plunge into warfare.But this is a book thickly populated with scores of characters stumbling towards their own versions of reprieve It is structured around free flowing accounts of several days in September 1938 when France mobilised for the prospect of a war with Germany which it knew would lead to the slaughter of millions and which it could not hope to win The character we were introduced to in The Age of Reason Boris, Lola, Ivich, Daniel, Bruno, Marcelle, as well as Mathieu appear infragmentary roles whilst a dozen or so others take their place in the narrative.The scenes switch from villages to Marseille, Casablanca, a Mediterranean cruise ship, Parisian bars, a hospital in the processes of evacuating its patients, street scenes involving violence and confusion, and bedrooms offering the first, or possibly the last chance to make love, as well as fleeting visits to the councils where Chamberlain and Daladier and their lackeys consider the stance they have taken towards Mr Hitler s final territorial demand The switch takes place mid paragraph, and often mid sentence, with an action taking place in one space being topped off by a thought generated in another Perhaps you need to have the memory of those weeks in 1970 when we were all being brought up to speed in the subtleties of existential thought to push ahead with a book which is often difficult For the 18 year old I then was it offered up many fragments of thoughts and intuitions about life which have been with me ever since When others walk across Pont Neuf they might see the view of the Isle de la Cite on one side, or the quais to the west and the Eiffel Tower in the distance I ve always seen Mathieu Delarue hanging on by his finger tips, wondering whether to live or die Wow Sartre has done a masterful job of capturing the looming sense of dread felt by his various characters as they try to go about their lives in as normal a way as possible in the days preceding the start of World War II Some remarkable stuff in here, from the story of the fellow terrified of suffering disability and disfigurement on the battlefield, to the Jew who does not identify with the suffering of the German Jews because he sees himself asFrench than Jewish At times, this is a h Wow Sartre has done a masterful job of capturing the looming sense of dread felt by his various characters as they try to go about their lives in as normal a way as possible in the days preceding the start of World War II Some remarkable stuff in here, from the story of the fellow terrified of suffering disability and disfigurement on the battlefield, to the Jew who does not identify with the suffering of the German Jews because he sees himself asFrench than Jewish At times, this is a hard read, as the stories intertwine so tightly that Sartre sometimes will be telling the story from the point of view in one location and then flip to the POV of a different character in a completely different location mid paragraph That said, it did not dissuade me from pushing forward with this powerful work Over all, a great novel that deserves a renaissance Satre was trying a method called simultaneous description with this book Which basically consisted of making the book fardifficult to read than necessary The constant jumping from one character to another, and one situation to the next, made it near on unreadable.I enjoyed The Age of Reason muchSatre s usual brilliance shines through in places, but i found it a chore to read. Much better than the first book of this trilogy This text is worth reading solely for the style Sartre uses to move between character s who are all experiencing the moments leading up to Hitler s reclaiming the Sudeten Germans from Czechoslovakia and the signing of the Munich Agreement on September 30, 1938 It s Europe right before it all went sour Of course, all the readers know where the lives of Sartre s characters are leading, but the characters don t and while you might think this mak Much better than the first book of this trilogy This text is worth reading solely for the style Sartre uses to move between character s who are all experiencing the moments leading up to Hitler s reclaiming the Sudeten Germans from Czechoslovakia and the signing of the Munich Agreement on September 30, 1938 It s Europe right before it all went sour Of course, all the readers know where the lives of Sartre s characters are leading, but the characters don t and while you might think this makes all their machinations trite, Sartre deftly weaves together the story of many human lives revealing a fascinating picture of the European mind before WWII If you could imagine reading this book not knowing anything about history you might believe that Sartre ended the book on a happy note, but of course the entire play for this trilogy really islike a play is a monograph on absurdity The inevitability of the horror that is coming to Europe sits in the reader s mind the entire trilogy and Sartre plays with this knowledge that he knows the reader to possess When France s Daladier returns home from the Munich meeting at the end of the book, he sees the cheering Parisian crowds who believe war has been averted and says Ah, les cons Ah, the fools historically I believe he actually did say this Here is what Winston Churchill actually said about the Munich Agreement, which I think sums up the book rather well We have suffered a total and unmitigated defeatyou will find that in a period of time which may be measured by years, but may be measured by months, Czechoslovakia will be engulfed in the Nazi r gime We are in the presence of a disaster of the first magnitudewe have sustained a defeat without a war, the consequences of which will travel far with us along our roadwe have passed an awful milestone in our history, when the whole equilibrium of Europe has been deranged, and that the terrible words have for the time being been pronounced against the Western democracies Thou art weighed in the balance and found wanting And do not suppose that this is the end This is only the beginning of the reckoning This is only the first sip, the first foretaste of a bitter cup which will be proffered to us year by year unless by a supreme recovery of moral health and martial vigour, we arise again and take our stand for freedom as in the olden time Perhaps it is my American upbringing and my study of history, but it seems that Sartre s characters are almost comically self interested and confused, given the severity of the situation they faced Perhaps Sartre was intentionally pushing his readership s buttons, as it were At the time the book takes place they could not know what would happen, but Sartre s readers did know and they were sitting in Cafe s in Paris just after the war reading the stories of these foolish people I can t imagine the sick feeling that must have crept into their stomachs at the turn of each page Interesting in the change of people and situations in the narrative This stream of consciousness writing is in the beginning disconcerting but did grow on me The plot revolves around The Munich peace of 1938 and the delay of war for another year Switching back between all the characters from the first novel and some new ones The change mobilization brings to many of the characters is the theme and the impact it has on them I look forward to the final book of the trilogy. Disappointing, tedious, awkward, unwieldy, a grossly inferior sequel Doesn t come close to capturing the anguish and confusion of the first novel, instead it just bashes the reader over the head with tired tropes about self knowledge and the like. This novel is the second book of Sartre sRoads to FreedomtrilogyThe Age of Reason The Reprieve , andTroubled SleepThe trilogy is over simply described as an historical fiction occurring among the events leading to, and including, France s experience of World War II A handful of protagonists recur throughout.In The Reprieve these familiar fictional protagonists interact with their fates and Europe s as war with Germany is anticipated, and This novel is the second book of Sartre sRoads to FreedomtrilogyThe Age of Reason The Reprieve , andTroubled SleepThe trilogy is over simply described as an historical fiction occurring among the events leading to, and including, France s experience of World War II A handful of protagonists recur throughout.In The Reprieve these familiar fictional protagonists interact with their fates and Europe s as war with Germany is anticipated, and then prevented , over Czechoslovakia Europe congratulates itself This novel is non linear and stream of consciousness Multiple sleepwalking characters in multiple locales across France and Europe interact unwittingly A character in Paris will lift a cup to his lips as another character at the conference in Munich will utter his next statement each unaware of the other The fate of the protagonists is interconnected with the fate of Europe And all are delusional.Being monolingual, and as a result of an American culturally imposed disability of arrogance, I read this book in English translation over 40 years ago I speak insufficient French.But the rhythms of the prose as the interplay of locales and consciousnesses dance through historical times are still unforgettable In French, it must be extraordinary This remarkable prose is used to inform and describe events both tragic and shameful Art and purpose are one The heart is captured And the soul is betrayed Europe rejoices Who are we `DOWNLOAD EPUB ⇶ Pena Suspensa ☛ A semana que antecedeu a entrada da Fran a na Segunda Guerra Pena Suspensa o momento dram tico, nico antes do ato irrevers vel e irremedi vel O momento em que a guerra e a paz s o ainda alternativas poss veis No correr implac vel das horas, cada um analisa as suas raz es para entrar ou n o entrar no conflitoPara Mathieu, que encontramos j em Idade da Raz o, h uma interfer ncia brusca, mas n o dram tica na sua liberdade de ser, uma conting ncia que aceita com aparente indiferen a Para Daniel ser o t o desejado aniquilamento, o mergulho na cat strofe universal que o salvar do vazio e da contradi o Para Boris, a esperan a da morte aos vinte anos, o fim em beleza para uma vida que planeou curtaPara todos, a expetativa de um destino comum que se adivinha tr gico e que igualar , numa identica impossibilidade de interferir no desencadear ds acontecimentos, a consci ncia e a responsabilidade de milhoes de indiv duos