( Ebook ) ☩ To Name Those Lost ♎ MOBI eBook or Kindle ePUB free

I try not to overdo the superlatives when it comes to discussing books, but Rowan Wilson s new novel To Name Those Lost is magnificent Somehow he has managed to capture both the brutality and the redemptive promise of early Tasmania in a superb novel that had me captivated from the moment I started reading it.Thomas Toosey is a veteran of the Black War about which Wilson wrote so evocatively in The Roving Party He is a hard man, brutalised by years of poverty and violence, his own childhood de I try not to overdo the superlatives when it comes to discussing books, but Rowan Wilson s new novel To Name Those Lost is magnificent Somehow he has managed to capture both the brutality and the redemptive promise of early Tasmania in a superb novel that had me captivated from the moment I started reading it.Thomas Toosey is a veteran of the Black War about which Wilson wrote so evocatively in The Roving Party He is a hard man, brutalised by years of poverty and violence, his own childhood destroyed by life on the Tasmanian frontier His first sight of the island as a child of fourteen sent out for thieving two overcoats in the winter of 1827 was the sandstone buildings studding the hill above the harbour in Hobart town and when they brought him above decks of the Woodford in iron fetters and set him aboard a longboat for the shore he d thought Hobart a pissing version of his own Blackpool, the inlaying of warehouse masonry much like the stores on Talbot Road, the stark shapes of houses near the same, but then the winter mist parted from the mountain peak above and he knew he was in venerable country, as old as rock, and it wasn t long before he became indentured to the frontiersman John Batman who ran a trade in victualling the army, and here the boy Thomas learned how the island s wilder parts truly belonged to the tribal blacks, a displaced people taking refuge in the hills, and for a government bounty and to secure his land this frontiersman meant to hunt them by whatever means just or unjust, bloody or brave, and he marshalled a party of transportees and black trackers and put into the scrub armed for war and war it was, a bloody war, in which all hands were soiled and Thomas s no less than another s for a killer now he was, an easy killer, and yet while he was diminished by it, made less in God s eyes and his own, he saw in the bullet, the knife, and the club a power that could make a man his own master p 55 You can see in this excerpt Wilson s masterful use of prose which conveys a sense of the 19th century and its rugged idiom without overdoing it.The use of that power lands Toosey a 10 year sentence in Port Arthur, further hardening his heart But this brute receives a pitiful message from his son, twelve years old, and motherless now Wow Rohan Wilson is producing books covering the days of the Wild West of Tasmania as brutal as Cormac Mccarthy.In Wilson s second book, Thomas Toosey has lead a brutal life and cares little about the lives of others except for the son he has left in Launceston and now journeys to find him to start a new life But Toosey has robbed an old lag and former mate Fitheal Flynn who is now tracking him with his daughter to revenge his lost His daughter has been seriously damaged, first by being crus Wow Rohan Wilson is producing books covering the days of the Wild West of Tasmania as brutal as Cormac Mccarthy.In Wilson s second book, Thomas Toosey has lead a brutal life and cares little about the lives of others except for the son he has left in Launceston and now journeys to find him to start a new life But Toosey has robbed an old lag and former mate Fitheal Flynn who is now tracking him with his daughter to revenge his lost His daughter has been seriously damaged, first by being crushed by a charging cow and then when she is pushed into a fire by Toosey when he enters and robs Flynn s house.They all meet in Launceston during the riots of 1874 when the locals protested against a levy to pay for the Deloraine railway.Wilson captures the poverty of the the underprivileged, the harshness of the police and the violence that ruled the life of the poor I could taste the dirt, blood and grit I ve spent a number of years immersed in the details of Tasmanian history This novel gathered together historical elements and brought them all vividly to life The characters are engaging in their often desperate journeys and the account of Launceston engulfed in rioting provides a vivid backdrop This is a great read for anyone interested in historical drama and the anarchic and often disparate elements of colonial life. Her head hit the floorboards, bounced, and a fog of ash billowed, thrown so by the motion of her spade It is 1874 Tasmania is in transition from its penal origins transportation ceased in 1853 But while the ruling classes are focussed on the structure and law of their society and increasing their wealth, there are a significant number of people struggling for their existence Many are former convicts In early 1874, pandemonium broke out in Launceston The government had imposed a levy on t Her head hit the floorboards, bounced, and a fog of ash billowed, thrown so by the motion of her spade It is 1874 Tasmania is in transition from its penal origins transportation ceased in 1853 But while the ruling classes are focussed on the structure and law of their society and increasing their wealth, there are a significant number of people struggling for their existence Many are former convicts In early 1874, pandemonium broke out in Launceston The government had imposed a levy on those living near the Deloraine Launceston railway line after the collapse of the company that built it Those who riot cause damage, but cannot prevail against the large and well armed police force The rioting was confined to the rabble and larrikin classes, scarcely any ratepayer taking part The Mercury, 9 February 1874 This is the background to the events in Rohan Wilson s novel William Toosey is 12 years old when his mother dies suddenly He writes to his father Thomas, asking for help Thomas Toosey who appeared as a boy in Rohan Wilson s first novel The Roving Party is a grey haired labourer who has spent 10 years in the Port Arthur Penitentiary, convicted of a dreadful crime He has stolen 200 in banknotes from Fitheal Flynn, with whom he was in prison, and his three daughters In short, although Toosey sets off for Launceston to find his son, he appears to be beyond redemption Flynn, accompanied by one of his daughters, disguised as a male and covered by a hood, sets off after Toosey Sure, he wants his money back but there sto the story than that Flynn and Toosey are both fathers seeking to make amends for their actions in the past by making provision for their children Toosey is desperate to find William, and acutely aware of the dangers that befall orphans in the streets Flynn is keen to track down Toosey he wants his own retribution.Rohan Wilson brings the Launceston of the 1870s to life from Cimitiere Street through the City Park to Princes Square, along Brisbane Street and Charles Street, across Windmill Hill and then later back through the town and across the river into the slums of Invermay The place and street names remain, and much of the landscape is recognisable today It s a dark, bleak story brilliantly told, set in a dark time in Launceston s colonial history History is the art by which we live our lives, he said You have your history and I have mine Jennifer Cameron Smith ( Ebook ) ☲ To Name Those Lost ♰ A powerful, suspenseful tale about a father and son in search of one another, this prize winning novel based on real life events is a classic western story of vengeance and redemption set against the sweeping, merciless grandeur of the Australian frontier It is the summer ofLaunceston, a colonial outpost on the southern Australian island of Tasmania, hovers on the brink of anarchy, teeming with revolutionaries, convicts, drunks, crooked cops, and poor strugglers looking for a break Outlaw Thomas Toosey races to this dangerous bedlam to find his motherless twelve year old son before the city swallows the child whole, but he is pursued by than just the law Hindering his progress at every turn is a man to whom he owes a terrible debt the vengeful Irishman Fitheal Finn, whose hooded companion hides a grotesque secret Brilliantly told in galloping, lyrical prose and infused with gothic tones reminiscent of Cormac McCarthy, Daniel Woodrell, and William Faulkner, To Name Those Lost is a gripping story of fatherly devotion and of one man s search for moral bearings in a lawless society Winner Victorian Premier s Literary Award Adelaide Festival Award for Best Novel I was anticipating this novel after I enjoyed Rohan Wilson s debut novel The Roving Party so much, and it was worth the wait This new novel could be Tasmania s answer to the American tradition of Westerns Set in the 1870s, in Tasmania, there is a cat and mouse chase for stolen money, blurred lines in the battle of good v evil, and with wealthy residents in grand homes and hotels while impoverished urchins and vagrants search for food and huddle beneath bridges, Launceston seems like the last f I was anticipating this novel after I enjoyed Rohan Wilson s debut novel The Roving Party so much, and it was worth the wait This new novel could be Tasmania s answer to the American tradition of Westerns Set in the 1870s, in Tasmania, there is a cat and mouse chase for stolen money, blurred lines in the battle of good v evil, and with wealthy residents in grand homes and hotels while impoverished urchins and vagrants search for food and huddle beneath bridges, Launceston seems like the last frontier of civilisation It s fast paced action is not for the faint hearted and I loved it as much as I did his first book I especially recommend it to anyone who has lived in or visited Tasmania so great to read a book set in my home state When an author has as stunning a debut as Rohan Wilson did with The Roving Party , there s always the fear that the follow up will disappoint Did every idea he had go into his first effort How will he do under the pressure of a deadline Was it simply a fluke Never have I seen such fears as comprehensively dispelled as with To Name Those Lost Not only has Wilson maintained and improved upon the sparse, unforgiving brutality of the prose in his previous work, he has stepped up his pacing, When an author has as stunning a debut as Rohan Wilson did with The Roving Party , there s always the fear that the follow up will disappoint Did every idea he had go into his first effort How will he do under the pressure of a deadline Was it simply a fluke Never have I seen such fears as comprehensively dispelled as with To Name Those Lost Not only has Wilson maintained and improved upon the sparse, unforgiving brutality of the prose in his previous work, he has stepped up his pacing, characterisation and general versatility In choosing essentially the same setting and time period for his second novel as he did with the first, Wilson ran the risk of the idea seeming dry or re hashed it doesn t at all This novel has the same brooding, serious quality as the The Roving Party , but is organised in such a way as to be a genuine page turner, a rare quality for books of this type It s grim, depressing stuff, but infused with a kind of beauty and vitality that stops it being too dense In fact it possesses quite a few of the qualities that made fellow Tasmanian Richard Flanagan s The Narrow Road To The Deep North so extraordinary I can only hope Wilson begins to receive some measure of the same kind of praise, as is very much deserved In time Jane dreamt of the cold dead in the earth far removed, and far above, among the mounds, hearts that beat hot like coals in a burning hearth and when the fire dies the ash collects, alwaysdust than ember,death than life, for that is the way And the chiefly gift of parent to child is this, to bed down the land with their ash and make a place where fire will breathe and be warm, and the debt is told in beads of white smoke, the furrowing heat And the sound of love is to name those lost who lived for others I have had the pleasure of reading author Rohan Wilson s first two novels in quick succession and am glad I have The first, The Roving Party, was a very good historical fiction based on actual events that portrayed the brutality Van Diemans Land during that colony s Black Wars Such was its impact I started this one immediately To Name Those Lost brings back the boy from The Roving Party, Thomas Toosey, as a now old man looking for redemption after a brutal life We follow his quest in his sea I have had the pleasure of reading author Rohan Wilson s first two novels in quick succession and am glad I have The first, The Roving Party, was a very good historical fiction based on actual events that portrayed the brutality Van Diemans Land during that colony s Black Wars Such was its impact I started this one immediately To Name Those Lost brings back the boy from The Roving Party, Thomas Toosey, as a now old man looking for redemption after a brutal life We follow his quest in his search for his lost son There is a strong cast of characters that come onto the story, each with a big part to play in Toosey s search Rohan Wilson has again somehow written bleak but beautiful prose in what is anarrative driven approach than his debut novel I would suggest that those that also like a defined story may find this novelto their liking than the debut that gave the readerto think about in thematic terms That is not meant to be criticism of this book There are certainly themes such as the above mentioned redemptive qualities, love for family and the worth of revenge And like his previous novel man s inhumanity to his fellow man looms large As with a well written historical novel the reader must learn from the events I knew nothing of the Launceston Railway Riots 1874 that play a big part in the telling of this tale Oh for a time machine to those that enjoy very good historical novels and to those that have been to sleepy Launceston and had no idea of its historical past You may have to be Aussie or even better Tassie to read this I liked the idea but the dialect from late 19th century Tasmania that was used by the former convicts is tough to decode Once past the language barrier, there s a strong story of relationships and of social class even in the backwater of Launceston. Well, this is fantastic I enjoyed Wilson s first book, The Roving Party, but this is even better On one hand it is the Australian Blood Meridian, its author our Cormac McCarthy On the other hand it is a rollicking adventure story with numerous well drawn characters and a pulsating plot To Name Those Lost is simply one of the best Australian novels I have read.