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FREE BOOK õ Ivanov ⚛ The first of Chekhov s full length dramas, Ivanov treads a fine line between broad comedy and tragic melodrama Ivanov, a young estate owner, is too intelligent and too bored to endure his provincial life He is a superfluous man, attracted to a beautiful young woman who threatens his moral foundations and leads him ultimately to tragedy This new translation beautifully captures Chekhov s dialogue for modern audiences Anton Chekhov, Ivanoff An Analytical ReviewThis review contains spoilers Massive spoilers view spoiler 1 IntroductionThe play is in four Acts The protagonist, Nicholas Ivanoff, is a no longer wealthy man fallen by his own inept financial sense His depression worsens to catastrophic consequence Ivanoff is surrounded by an interfering doctor and troublemaking friends with tenuous but correlative relationships The result is a story with many dramatic threads that weave together without ex Anton Chekhov, Ivanoff An Analytical ReviewThis review contains spoilers Massive spoilers view spoiler 1 IntroductionThe play is in four Acts The protagonist, Nicholas Ivanoff, is a no longer wealthy man fallen by his own inept financial sense His depression worsens to catastrophic consequence Ivanoff is surrounded by an interfering doctor and troublemaking friends with tenuous but correlative relationships The result is a story with many dramatic threads that weave together without exasperating the reader.The play uncovers problems of xenophobic confidence in one s faith, religion, or class against a dramatic romance Modern pressures are encapsulated in the plot but, like some other great plays, a sparsity of detail makes this one suitable for many or any setting s The product is not therefore limited in relevance or geography.This review comments on each act s ending and explores how this helps build the story s tempo and the characters stakes The chronology may therefore seem a little awkward, but it is purposeful by understanding how choices are made at each Act s close, it is easier to understand and discover the smaller choices that lead to the four Act ending choices.2 The Acts 2.1 Act IAct I ends when Ivanoff s wife, Anna later called by her birth name, Sarah , chooses to disobey his order to stay at home one evening He orders her thus because he does not want her illness to kill her sooner than it otherwise would Ivanoff and the doctor know the illness is that serious, but Anna does not.The illness darkens Ivanoff s perspective Through the gloom, he makes rash, poor decisions he cannot take the misery at home so visits friends instead This causes the rift that makes Anna rebel and ignore him The Act relays that Ivanoff s behaviour is determined by a wish not to hurt his wife Later, this is misinterpreted by Lvoff, Anna s doctor For now, it causes his wife to react, which later causes another conflict.During Act I Ivanoff s companion, Borkin, shows his roguery he suggests Ivanoff buy land on the opposite riverbank and threaten the miller and factory downstream with a dam, to extort them When others gossip in later Acts and accuse Borkin of mischief, the audience knows it is true.Lvoff threaten s to resign because Anna ignores his medical advice to stay home He is a tedious man constantly telling others their faults, and acclaiming his own honesty Unlike Borkin, who is called dastardly and behaves accordingly, Lvoff only calls himself honourable but behaves otherwise All the others see through his claims and dislike him his honesty is not only cutting, but it is a peculiar type of honesty He seems only to be honest to make himself seem superior, at others feelings expense 2.2 Act IIThe second Act ends when Anna catches her husband romantically kissing Sasha Ivanoff is only in this situation because he cannot stand the depression at home Sasha offers him respite He succumbs to her kindliness.Sasha stalwartly believes Ivanoff is a suitable match for her Sasha s father, Lebedieff, warns against him, even though they are old friends Sasha ignores her father s advice Still, the kiss is a surprise because her feelings theretofore are restrained It is not, however, beyond the personality she displays The kiss is genuine This authenticity is evident to the characters and so hurts Anna all thewhen she glimpses it.During Act II, Borkin again evidences his deceitfulness He sets up an engagement and attempts to profit from the marriage He offers a wealthy woman an impoverished man s title Ivanoff s uncle, Count Shabelski , and the man the woman s money His idea is to borrow money from Shabelski that Shabelski would come into after marrying Borkin wants the money to bribe on his own the miller and factory owner Later, Ivanoff accuses him of iniquity, and this behaviour sets up that claim s truth 2.3 Act IIIAct III ends with Ivanoff telling Anna she is mortally ill He does not want to He regrets it Events escalate in the third Act because Anna now mistrusts him Sasha one day visits Ivanoff and Anna s matrimonial home Anna understandably gets angry.Ivanoff rejects Borkin for a while, after Lebedieff explains to Ivanoff that Borkin is bringing his reputation down Association to the scoundrel is hampering.Lvoff, berates Ivanoff for meeting Sasha in Anna s house Ivanoff, however, did not invite her She just turns up and excepting his good manners he tacitly, quickly asks her to leave 2.4 Act IVA year elapses before the last Act At the end of it, at Ivanoff and Sasha s wedding, before the vows, Ivanoff shoots himself It is caused and justified by events and behaviours that all lead to Ivanoff s choice The story is therefore coherent, however surprising the end is Also, the outcome is not contrived because all events lead to this choice.Anna dies between Acts III and IV Ivanoff is wracked with guilt Lvoff plays the I told you so and annoys everyone at the same time.Lebedieff believes his daughter, Sasha, should not marry Ivanoff because he is no good for her Lebedieff does not declare Ivanoff a scoundrel as Lvoff implies, but he nonetheless agrees the marriage would be a poor one Ivanoff agrees with the assessment.Ivanoff is angry at Lvoff for his pestering honesty All Ivanoff wants is to let Sasha be happy He tells her so She insists He sees one way out suicide.The action builds rapidly in this Act Duals are mentioned This feels a little alien to the rest of the play s theme But in the end that does not matter The idea of duelling seems to be introduced so that when Ivanoff pulls his gun the audience will assume he will shoot one of the others who have antagonised him This makes his turning the gun on himselfshocking.3 Analytical ConclusionsThe play has several underpinning moral themes There is a warning against borrowing money Ivanoff s woes spiral out from his inability to pay interest on his debts the play warns against the desire to present oneself as superior to others by committing to that persona, Lvoff must know he is partly to blame for Ivanoff s suicide The play contrasts the dangers of blind love against an illuminated heroism Ivanoff would rather die than ruin Sasha s life by marrying her The play also warns against corrupting friendships but demonstrates that such bonds are difficult to break, even through turmoil and betrayal hide spoiler The play is well paced and well structured I imagine I would enjoy this on stage Until an opportunity arises, I will just have to use my imagination Still, the play is an enjoyable read Oh, how easy and simple it all is But you are mistaken, doctor in each one of us there are too many springs, too many wheels and cogs for us to judge each other by first impressions or by two or three external indications I cannot understand you, you cannot understand me, and neither of us can understand himself Anton Chekhov s The Seagull was the first play I attended in out of school context, and I was blown away by it and not just by the gun shot It affected me so deeply tears rolledOh, how easy and simple it all is But you are mistaken, doctor in each one of us there are too many springs, too many wheels and cogs for us to judge each other by first impressions or by two or three external indications I cannot understand you, you cannot understand me, and neither of us can understand himself Anton Chekhov s The Seagull was the first play I attended in out of school context, and I was blown away by it and not just by the gun shot It affected me so deeply tears rolled down my cheeks by the end of the play So when I discovered that Chekhov s 1887 play Ivanov was on the program of the local cultural centre, I jumped on the chance it looked the perfect occasion as a means to reconnect with theatre, after a pause of seventeen years without attending any play As the performance was presented as an adaptation and even a deconstruction of Chekhov, afterwards I was curious to discover the original text to which the performance stayed remarkably true, apart from removing a few of the numerous minor characters from the plot and with it obliterating the symbolism of the card playing in the backdrop of the play which serves as a commentary on the unpredictability of life and fateIf an intelligent, educated, and healthy man begins to complain of his lot and go down hill, there is nothing for him to do but to go on down until he reaches the bottom there is no hope for him Where could my salvation come from How can I save myself I cannot drink, because it makes my head ache I never could write bad poetry I cannot pray for strength and see anything lofty in the languor of my soul Laziness is laziness and weakness weakness I can find no other names for them I am lost, I am lost there is no doubt of that The 35 year old Nikolai Ivanov is a complex and moody man Is he guilty as he repeats over and over again himself or innocent His environment his moribund wife Anna, the doctor Lvov who thinks he is a cold and heartless monster and a fortune chaser, the brash manager of Ivanov s estate, Borkin, the Lebedevs, the cynic count Shabelsky Ivanov s uncle , Sasha wishing to rescue him everyone is discussing him, criticising him, loving him Ivanov is the anti hero at the centre of the play, but no one seems to hear what he is trying to say all are too absorbed by their own dreams and little drama s No one understands what is eating him, why he changed into an prickly, paralyzed man outwardly indifferent to his wife dying and his estate going to ruins by debts and neglect Ivanov s motives might not be as low as they look at first glance Depicting Ivanov s unrest, melancholy, despair and subsequent inability to take care of himself and of others, pushing everyone away in his shame, Chekhov paints a nowadays utterly recognisable, poignant and convincing portrayal of a state of depression and how difficult it is for others to respond to it in a meaningful way.Can love save one from depression What can one do to help a loved one who is struggling with depression cope Some of the questions Ivanov rises seem timeless or rather timely, thinking of present day in which so many struggle with the condition and the pharmaceutical industry grows fat on the profits from selling antidepressants Michel Houellebecq poses similar questions in his latest novel Serotonin And as far as Houellebecq and Chekhov suggest answers to these issues, don t expect them to be of the heartening kindI am a bad, pathetic and worthless individual One needs to be pathetic, too, worn out and drained by drink, like Pasha, to be still fond of me and to respect me My God, how I despise myself I so deeply loathe my voice, my walk, my hands, these clothes, my thoughts Well, isn t that funny, isn t that shocking Less than a year ago I was healthy and strong, I was cheerful, tireless, passionate, I worked with these very hands, I could speak to move even Philistines to tears, I could cry when I saw grief, I became indignant when I encountered evil I knew inspiration, I knew the charm and poetry of quiet nights when from dusk to dawn you sit at your desk or indulge you mind with dreams I believed, I looked into the future as into the eyes of my own mother And now, my God, I am exhausted, I do not believe, I spend my days and nights in idleness Ach Ivanov, poor Ivanov, how heavy life can weigh on a man s shouldersThe life of a man is like a flower, blooming so gaily in a field Then, along comes a goat, he eats it, and the flower is gone Once Chekhov told Tikhonov, a young mining engineer, contemplating Russia, Our cities are without paved streets, our villages poor, our people worn When we re young we all chirp fervently like sparrows on a dung heap, but we re old by the time we re forty and we start thinking of death What kind of heroes are we Not everyone can carry the weight of the world paintings by Isaac Levitan 1860 1900 Anton Chekhov was the artist s closest friend Ivanov, Anton Chekhov Ivanov is a four act drama by the Russian playwright Anton Chekhov Ivanov was first performed in 1887, when Fiodor Korsh, owner of the Korsh Theatre in Moscow, commissioned Chekhov to write a comedy Chekhov, however, responded with a four act drama, which he wrote in ten days Despite the success of its first performance, the production disgusted Chekhov himself In a letter to his brother, he wrote that he did not recognise his first remarks as my own and that the acto Ivanov, Anton Chekhov Ivanov is a four act drama by the Russian playwright Anton Chekhov Ivanov was first performed in 1887, when Fiodor Korsh, owner of the Korsh Theatre in Moscow, commissioned Chekhov to write a comedy Chekhov, however, responded with a four act drama, which he wrote in ten days Despite the success of its first performance, the production disgusted Chekhov himself In a letter to his brother, he wrote that he did not recognise his first remarks as my own and that the actors do not know their parts and talk nonsense Irritated by this failure, Chekhov made alterations to the play Consequently, the final version is different from that first performance After this revision, it was accepted to be performed in St Petersburg in 1889 Chekhov s revised version was a success and offered a foretaste of the style and themes of his subsequent masterpieces 2006 1349 145 1383 136 1388 9789643412586 1392 19 1392 104 1395 9786009652024 1395 9786002532664 This 1887 four act play by Chekhov introduces us to Nicholas Ivanoff, thirty five years old and married to Anna, who is dying of consumption Is this the reason Ivanoff is so depressed Or is his melancholy personality something he is simply no longer able to hide During the opening lines I liked Ivanoff because of a statement he makes to his uncle Borkin, who is also his estate manager Borkin had come tiptoeing in and actually pointed a gun in Ivanoff s face as a joke After they both settle This 1887 four act play by Chekhov introduces us to Nicholas Ivanoff, thirty five years old and married to Anna, who is dying of consumption Is this the reason Ivanoff is so depressed Or is his melancholy personality something he is simply no longer able to hide During the opening lines I liked Ivanoff because of a statement he makes to his uncle Borkin, who is also his estate manager Borkin had come tiptoeing in and actually pointed a gun in Ivanoff s face as a joke After they both settle a bit, Ivanoff says I am reading now I shall attend to you later I m sure we all can imagine how satisfying it would be to say this at least once We would have to use our best regal manner, of course, but I for one am quite willing to start practicing the proper royaltone.Anyway, I liked Ivanoff at that point, but then the doctor comes out and is very upset about how Ivanoff s treatment of his wife Anna is killing her She needs peace and quiet, not the emotional torment the doctor seems to feel Ivanoff is causing her I thought the doctor might possibly have been in love with Anna himself, because during the entire play he seemed muchupset than he should have been as a professional medical man He hated Ivanoff with a passion and wanted to let the world know what a scoundrel he truly was.There is gossip about why Ivanoff married Annagossip about his debts,gossip about his business dealings,gossip about his relationship with young Sasha, 20 years old and very much in love with Ivanoff I got confused about the man, and also noticed that the rest of the cast seemed to carry the story alongthan he did He was mainly silent and brooding, but when he did speak he did so with great intensity, even while he seemed as confused as I was.I had an idea of how the play might end, but I changed my mind many times right up to the moment of the final curtain I cannot pretend to analyze this play in any sort of intellectual way I can only say that for me it was a fascinating glimpse at an unusual life I am glad I read it, and I hope to readChekhov soon