@READ KINDLE ì Typhoon ⚛ eBook or E-pub free

I guess my rhythm of reading Joseph Conrad s works will always be 1st half Forcing myself to read it 2nd half somehow it grows on me to almost liking it I guess my rhythm of reading Joseph Conrad s works will always be 1st half Forcing myself to read it 2nd half somehow it grows on me to almost liking it Don t you be put out by anything Keep her facing it They may say what they like, but the heaviest seas run with the wind Facing it always facing it that s the way to get through You are a young sailor Face it That s enough for any man Keep a cool head A few years ago, Penguin published 80 short novellas and essays and called the set Little Black Classics Box Set Last year they expanded that set by another 46 books This one is number 96.Conrad can take a simple idea and graduallyDon t you be put out by anything Keep her facing it They may say what they like, but the heaviest seas run with the wind Facing it always facing it that s the way to get through You are a young sailor Face it That s enough for any man Keep a cool head A few years ago, Penguin published 80 short novellas and essays and called the set Little Black Classics Box Set Last year they expanded that set by another 46 books This one is number 96.Conrad can take a simple idea and gradually pull out of it the deep complexities of man Typhoon is a novella that basically cooks a brilliant story out of a storm a boat Captain MacWhirr and his crew Setting was fantastic Characters were perfect Story was tight Narrative was interestingly rigged with letters from MacWhirr to his wife, Juke to his friend and Rout to his wife These letters framed the narrative with a reflected look at the distance between those at sea and those who remain safe on land I only gave it four stars because I ve read better novels by Conrad Victory, Nostromo, Heart of Darkness, Lord Jim , not because I ve read many better writers @READ KINDLE õ Typhoon ⚪ She s done for The crew aboard a ramshackle steamer faces a treacherous storm in this gripping tale, inspired by Conrad s own time at seaOne ofnew books in the bestselling Little Black Classics series, to celebrate the first ever Penguin Classic inEach book gives readers a taste of the Classics huge range and diversity, with works from around the world and across the centuries including fables, decadence, heartbreak, tall tales, satire, ghosts, battles and elephants Another extraordinary novella from the pen of a man who wrote about the sea like no other Beautiful writing combined with an intense and exciting story isthan enough to satisfy me as a reader, but Conrad doesn t stop at that Typhoon isthan a novella about how men react under stress It isthat a story about human bravery Conrad knows how to complex even in shorter literary forms What always amazed me about this writer is the incredibly detailed psychological portrayal of his Another extraordinary novella from the pen of a man who wrote about the sea like no other Beautiful writing combined with an intense and exciting story isthan enough to satisfy me as a reader, but Conrad doesn t stop at that Typhoon isthan a novella about how men react under stress It isthat a story about human bravery Conrad knows how to complex even in shorter literary forms What always amazed me about this writer is the incredibly detailed psychological portrayal of his character Conrad is one of those writers who can paint a soul of man with a few clever hints This is probably the main reason why I can t get enough of his writing Moreover, he novels and characters never feel repetitive, even when he explores similar themes Another thing worth mentioning is there is a good amount of humour in this one Conrad can be quite funny If you want to see how he does subtle irony and humour, this book is as good choice as any.The ending was brilliant and made me reflect about the bridge that divided the wives and the husbands of the old Here we have loyal husbands who write long letters to wives they love The wives in question seem to be perfectly alright with the fact they hardly ever see their husbands Moreover, the wives even the children don t seem to be eager to see them at all The mariner husbands clearly idolize their wives and children who in turn care little for them It makes you wonder, doesn t it We re taught that before feminism women used to be perceived as lesser beings but maybe it is no less true that in those times women were also often idolized, seen as perfectly innocent creatures and put first It was completely normal to expect from a man to risk his life and work hard for his family even when he would get nothing in return Another sea story for me to end the year and the decade I enjoyed this infinitelythan Poe s The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket Packed into this short novel is a bit of plot and a lot of characterization, together with pleasing prose Several other reviewers mention how well Conrad writes, despite English not being his first language Maybe that s why he writes so well The men who served under Captain MacWhirr don t think highly of him Generally, they think this quiet, so Another sea story for me to end the year and the decade I enjoyed this infinitelythan Poe s The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket Packed into this short novel is a bit of plot and a lot of characterization, together with pleasing prose Several other reviewers mention how well Conrad writes, despite English not being his first language Maybe that s why he writes so well The men who served under Captain MacWhirr don t think highly of him Generally, they think this quiet, sober man is a fool When the barometer drops, and even MacWhirr knows there s dirty weather ahead, they think he knows not a thing They want him to alter course, but he is determined to keep to schedule It isn t as if MacWhirr knows what he should do facing such weather, it is his first typhoon Hard to imagine that, his having been in the South China Sea for several seasons, but that s another matter MacWhirr, First Mate Jukes and Chief Engineer Rout are all well drawn characters They are flesh and blood on the printed page Conrad also gives us caricatures of their home life and family While these parts lendthan a little humor, they also add to the characterizations of the seamen The typhoon is also real enough I did hope to like this I have read two previous novels by Conrad one I liked 5 stars worth and one that scraped by at 2 stars This was the decider do I reador let him go in favor of someone else So now my only problem is to find another that I think I can hold on to One of the greatest examples in literature of landscape and nature treated as character Although on one level this classic sea story is about the uneasy relations between the phlegmatic captain and his high strung first mate, the antagonist, and in many ways the main character, is the storm itself This is the disintegrating power of a great wind it isolates one from one s kind An earthquake, a landslip, an avalanche, overtake a man incidentally, as it were without passion A furious galeOne of the greatest examples in literature of landscape and nature treated as character Although on one level this classic sea story is about the uneasy relations between the phlegmatic captain and his high strung first mate, the antagonist, and in many ways the main character, is the storm itself This is the disintegrating power of a great wind it isolates one from one s kind An earthquake, a landslip, an avalanche, overtake a man incidentally, as it were without passion A furious gale attacks him like a personal enemy, tries to grasp his limbs, fastens upon his mind, seeks to rout his very spirit out of him This is my favorite of Conrad s novels, simply because the writing is so strong, evoking all the senses you can feel it, hear, smell and taste the wind and water, and of course visualize it in all its shadowy hues, while the currents of man versus man, and men versus the elements, rage around each other like the storm itself At the end, I felt like I had to rinse the salt water from my body I have never read anything by Joseph Conrad before and was intrigued to read this not least as the late Clive James mentioned that he was his favourite author, in his reading memoir, Latest Readings As Mr James has often pointed me in the direction of books authors I have enjoyed, I was keen to give him a try Many of the characters in this novella have names which could come straight from Dickens including the central, Captain MacWhirr, who is taking the steamer, Nan Shan, straight into a t I have never read anything by Joseph Conrad before and was intrigued to read this not least as the late Clive James mentioned that he was his favourite author, in his reading memoir, Latest Readings As Mr James has often pointed me in the direction of books authors I have enjoyed, I was keen to give him a try Many of the characters in this novella have names which could come straight from Dickens including the central, Captain MacWhirr, who is taking the steamer, Nan Shan, straight into a typhoon The scenes of the storm are extremely vivid and, it was obvious, Conrad writes with much experience here He is a man often belittled by his crew and, in a clever twist, his wife back home in England can hardly be bothered to read his letters Overall, an engaging novella Conrad s knowledge of the sea shines through in what can only be described as an exhausting read From the outbreak of the typhoon to the end the story is relentless There is no room to pause for thought you are thrown from one page to the next by the constant storm Engulfed in the waves that sweep you on to the next page Floundering around on the wind swept deck of each page you wonder if you will make it to the end of the sentence or pulled under by the fingers of the mighty ocean.Wonderful Conrad s knowledge of the sea shines through in what can only be described as an exhausting read From the outbreak of the typhoon to the end the story is relentless There is no room to pause for thought you are thrown from one page to the next by the constant storm Engulfed in the waves that sweep you on to the next page Floundering around on the wind swept deck of each page you wonder if you will make it to the end of the sentence or pulled under by the fingers of the mighty ocean.Wonderful writing from a man of great talent The first thing that comes to mind after reading Typhoon, while reading actually, is Conrad s absolute mastery of the language He is an artist of the English language and the fact that it is not his first langauge makes his virtuosity all theastounding Typhoon isabout a storm of humanity amidst a chaotic event than about the storm itself MacWirr is a simple, brutally honest and innocent, almost naive, seaman No doubt Conrad had seen his like many times before As he liked to say The first thing that comes to mind after reading Typhoon, while reading actually, is Conrad s absolute mastery of the language He is an artist of the English language and the fact that it is not his first langauge makes his virtuosity all theastounding Typhoon isabout a storm of humanity amidst a chaotic event than about the storm itself MacWirr is a simple, brutally honest and innocent, almost naive, seaman No doubt Conrad had seen his like many times before As he liked to say that not all there is can be found in books, Conrad uses this character to deliver just such a lesson ironic though it is and provides a simple portrait of leadership and elegant determinism I can see where Conrad could be attacked for racism in his depiction of the Chinese,of an amorphous mass than a group of men, but he does show glimpses of auniversalist concern toward the end He was a man of his times Excellent book Look, I am not hip on exciting adventure stories, so I have had to ask myself why in the world I have enjoyed this as much as I do Writing the review has helped me think this through I hope my thoughts will help others decide if they will enjoy the book too First of all, the writing, the prose, is exceptionally good It is pretty darn amazing, since English was not Joseph Conrad s mother tongue He was born in Poland in 1857 On the other hand, he worked for the British mercantile marine for Look, I am not hip on exciting adventure stories, so I have had to ask myself why in the world I have enjoyed this as much as I do Writing the review has helped me think this through I hope my thoughts will help others decide if they will enjoy the book too First of all, the writing, the prose, is exceptionally good It is pretty darn amazing, since English was not Joseph Conrad s mother tongue He was born in Poland in 1857 On the other hand, he worked for the British mercantile marine for sixteen years and thereafter became a British citizen Simply by becoming a British citizen though, does not mean one by osmosis becomes so fluent, so adept in the new language The writing is vivid The description of the storm will have you on the edge of your seat Before the storm has even arrived, tension mounts One palpably perceives the stillness, the menacing calm that precedes the storm It is spooky it is eerie The storm erupts, all hell breaks loose, then the lull at the eye of the storm descends The reader is completely caught up in the weather Quite simply, the writing is extremely good Secondly, Conrad puts the different parts of the story together well During the lull in the storm, we are told the barometer is dropping and dropping it has never been so low This tells us the second part of the storm will be worse Conrad is clever, he doesn t give usstorm, instead he speeds forward to when the storm is over Then we become aware of the destruction the storm has wrought by observing the horrible state of the ship Had Conrad given usstorm, this would have been repetitive Instead Conrad leaves it to our own imagination, in our mind s eye the fury of the storm attains monstrous proportions I see this as a smart move by the author Conrad uses both what is given and what is withheld to advantage Through both he conjures mood Into this scary adventure tale Conrad adds humor, ironical humor I will give one example When Captain MacWhirr s wife gets her husband s letters, does she read them carefully through and through No She finds them pedestrian and boring At one point he writes of how on Christmas day he thought the ship would go under She, skimming through the letter, did not even bother to turn over the letter s pages That shows how interested she is We note her lack of interest and how inattentive she is The humor got me thinking What is Conrad saying in this story I think he is saying something about how readers read How inattentive we are Even Captain MacWhirr does not rely on what is written in important shipping manuals What is interesting is what Conrad is saying by this Readers should pay attention, but few do.What else is Conrad saying He draws the racial and sexist prejudices that existed in his time He does not refute that they exist, but he also shows alternate ways of thinking I see this in how Captain MacWhirr speaks of his wife and the manner in which the Chinese coolies view spoiler are confined below deck hide spoiler , but then at the end the captain writes again to his wife telling her how he misses her and we observe how he fairly view spoiler divides the money to the coolies on board ship I doubt the authorities in Fu chau, the final destination, would have divided the money so equably hide spoiler This is a step forward Conrad gives us characters that are true to the era and yet he shows little steps that can be taken to ameliorate conditions for those who are at a disadvantage In my view, the middle road, which Conrad takes, is realistic The audiobook is narrated by Roger Allam It s good it s fine I did at times have difficulty hearing what is said The name of Jukes, the young first mate, an important figure, was not always clearly articulated It seemed to me to be pronounced in different ways, which I found confusing at the start The narration I have given three stars.The prose, how Conrad chose to put the story together and the addition of humor is what has made the book worth reading for me He also had me thinking about the message s he wished to convey This information has been made available to me by Elizabeth, a GR friend in a group discussion of the book Curious forLook here