.READ BOOK ♴ Dungeons and Desktops: The History of Computer Role-Playing Games ☤ eBooks or Kindle ePUB free

A good survey of computer RPGs, though a few were missed, including my favorite, Demise Screen shots are nearly pointless, small and greyscale Actually 443 pages. I enjoyed this history of the CRPG genre, especially the coverage of older games Despite their rudimentary graphics and interfaces, some of the old games featured surprisingly sophisticated mechanics Also mentioned are quite a few games which, despite being good and innovative, didn t manage to achieve success in their time They are waiting to be rediscovered, or at least mined for inspiration.Here s a quote from the book describing a complex and deliberate game This game takes players I enjoyed this history of the CRPG genre, especially the coverage of older games Despite their rudimentary graphics and interfaces, some of the old games featured surprisingly sophisticated mechanics Also mentioned are quite a few games which, despite being good and innovative, didn t manage to achieve success in their time They are waiting to be rediscovered, or at least mined for inspiration.Here s a quote from the book describing a complex and deliberate game This game takes players about as far from instant gratification as they can get without joining a monastery The author concludes with an apologia for the single player CRPG in this time of apparent decline of the genre Dungeons and Desktops is a great overview of computer role playing games from the beginning of the era all the way to when the book was published in 2008 The research required for these summaries must have been staggering, although I d guess it was fun research since the author actually played at least most of the games.One thing the author does repeatedly that sometimes confused me is referring to games by their subtitles For instance, he ll make a reference to The Black Gate instead of u Dungeons and Desktops is a great overview of computer role playing games from the beginning of the era all the way to when the book was published in 2008 The research required for these summaries must have been staggering, although I d guess it was fun research since the author actually played at least most of the games.One thing the author does repeatedly that sometimes confused me is referring to games by their subtitles For instance, he ll make a reference to The Black Gate instead of using the full title, Ultima VII The Black Gate When he does this for games I know and have played like The Black Gate , that s fine But when he does it for games and series with which I m not familiar, it s disorienting I have to either shrug and keep reading, or flip back a few dozen pages and try to figure out what game he s talking about Beyond that, there were only two things he mentioned that I believe are incorrect First, when he reviews the Spelljammer game, he refers to it as Steampunk ugh, no, it s ADD in space, not some techno magic mashup although it is possible the game just presented the universe wrong Second, when talking about Ultima Underworld, he compares it to id Software s Wolfenstein 3D Actually, a better comparison would be id s Catacomb Abyss 3D, which featured the same type of realtime graphics, but was released a full year before Wolf not to mention Hovertank, Interphase, or MechWarrior all of which preceded even Catacomb 3D Wolf 3D was a landmark, sure, but it was not the first game with realtime 3D graphics.The book never mentions GOG.com granted, I think GOG started in the same year the book was released , but I wanted to mention it in this review Many of the games mentioned in the book can be purchased, legally, from GOG.com, and every game on there has been updated with emulation so that it will run on your modern computer Many of the classic series like Ultima, Neverwinter Nights, and Might and Magic can be purchased, some are even available in multi game packages and a few are totally free Obtaining and playing most of these games on modern machines should be trivial If you want the Apple IIe, C64, NES, or Amiga versions of the games, you re on your own But you can definitely find a lot of the DOS games on GOG.Overall, this book was an enjoyable read, one that had me making many notes to search for older classics I never played but should Not only that, but reading this book has gotten me thinking and excited about making my own RPG My obscure 1994 CRPG that four people on the planet have played is just begging for a sequel I might even make the sequel usingthan four colors, wheee What this book comes down to is a list of games I think the first part of the book is the most useful, as the mainframe games of the 70s and the like are not well known, and it s good of the author to make a record of them before they get completely forgotten.However, I didn t find the book particularly well written It has an arrogant tone at times, defining the reader as someone who has most certainly read Lord of the Rings nope, didn t get through the slow open of that , must be well aware What this book comes down to is a list of games I think the first part of the book is the most useful, as the mainframe games of the 70s and the like are not well known, and it s good of the author to make a record of them before they get completely forgotten.However, I didn t find the book particularly well written It has an arrogant tone at times, defining the reader as someone who has most certainly read Lord of the Rings nope, didn t get through the slow open of that , must be well aware of Star Wars eh, seen the original trilology and Episode I, but I wouldn t consider myself a fan amoung other things This dates the book, for one thing, and alienates readers who don t match the author s mental image.The other problem is that as a list it doesn t have much of a narrative arc it might have worked better, after the first chapter with the earliest games, to follow companies from creation to dissolution, perhaps.Still, an interesting book, sure to point out a few RPGs you ve missed, and worthwhile for studying games that simply aren t available any , but I wouldn t recommend it as a whole The book wants to be the history of computer role playing games CRPGs , but it s only half way there Overall, the book is stuck somewhere between the possible ways how such a study could be performed the book is not a academic historical study and review of the genre it contains a lot of personal opinions, judgments and biases of the author Some of them are introduced as such which is OK , others are not and it s not OK for such a study The descriptions of most of the games are quite s The book wants to be the history of computer role playing games CRPGs , but it s only half way there Overall, the book is stuck somewhere between the possible ways how such a study could be performed the book is not a academic historical study and review of the genre it contains a lot of personal opinions, judgments and biases of the author Some of them are introduced as such which is OK , others are not and it s not OK for such a study The descriptions of most of the games are quite shallow, and they speak mainly to people who already played the game The book is also lacking a classification framework within which the games would be studied, and the descriptions of different games often focus on different aspects of the game it s also not a personal subjective testimony about the era and the games For that, the book is actually not personal enough and it is not clear whether the author played the games he writes about, or bases his descriptions only on third party information it s also not a collection of such testimonies e.g from the designers of the games Apparently, the author based the book only on information available online, but did not make any attempts at contacting and interviewing the authors to fill any gaps and add the actual historical context and finally, it s not even a good catalog of the games, because of the chaotic organization of the book the book is divided by ages or epochs of CRPG development, but these are fuzzy and overlap, so the book appears chronologically organized from a distance, but it really is not Moreover, some important games on the fringes of the genre are missing e.g Deus Ex should, in my opinion, be included in the book , while others Legend of Zelda, Dungeon Keeper is not This only adds to the feeling that the author wrote the book to justify his opinions of the genre, but not to catalogue and or study it in its full breadth.Overall this books has some nostalgic value If you used to play the games, the descriptions might remind you of the games, and make you dream a bit For everyone else, the CRPG book from might be a better choice I still need to read that one indetail This book is great when it discusses trends, contrasts games, and looks beyond the superficial Unfortunately, that only consists of about a third of this book The rest is largely a listing of games with brief summaries of somewhat dubious value although it did remind me of some great games I haven t thought of for years, like The Summoning and Star Trail These sorts of lists are a dime a dozen on the internet and Barton doesn t bring any particular insight or wit to push this one above the This book is great when it discusses trends, contrasts games, and looks beyond the superficial Unfortunately, that only consists of about a third of this book The rest is largely a listing of games with brief summaries of somewhat dubious value although it did remind me of some great games I haven t thought of for years, like The Summoning and Star Trail These sorts of lists are a dime a dozen on the internet and Barton doesn t bring any particular insight or wit to push this one above the rest The tone of the writing is often very arrogant and smug, and there werethan a few obvious copyediting problems in my copy Verdict Interesting in parts but not essential .READ BOOK ♳ Dungeons and Desktops: The History of Computer Role-Playing Games ♶ Computer role playing games CRPGs are a special genre of computer games that bring the tabletop role playing experience of games such as Dungeons Dragons to the computer screen This genre includes classics such as Ultima and The Bard s Tale as well as modern games such as World of Warcraft and Guild Wars Written in an engaging style for both the computer game enthusiast and the casual computer game player, this book explores the history of the genre by telling the stories of the developers, games, and gamers who created it Let s get something straight this is not a history book This is two men gushing about their nostalgia for classic CRPGs through text The claim that this contains The History of Computer Roleplaying Games is completely false the text is littered with opinions presented as facts or simply the most widely held view, a lack of comprehensive coverage of many important parts of the CRPG industry after the turn of the century, lame jokes, and worst of all a heavy degree of arrogant PC elitism Th Let s get something straight this is not a history book This is two men gushing about their nostalgia for classic CRPGs through text The claim that this contains The History of Computer Roleplaying Games is completely false the text is littered with opinions presented as facts or simply the most widely held view, a lack of comprehensive coverage of many important parts of the CRPG industry after the turn of the century, lame jokes, and worst of all a heavy degree of arrogant PC elitism The authors fail to even stay true to their claimed purpose, wasting two entire sections of the book on the JRPG just so they can make antiquated arguments about its appeal to children in an attempt to dumb down their fans in the eyes of the reader.As someone who considers RPGs his favorite genre of video game, I was sorely disappointed in this misguided charade of history Interesting survey of computer RPGs from the early days of mainframes to the then current day of 2008 A little too US centric and prone to getting lost in the weeds of minor titles, but a nice summary of industry trends and full of ideas that could potentially be revived for future games. It was wonderful to revisit a bunch of games I played when I was younger I can tell that Mr Barton really loves computer role playing games and this book is a wonderful testament to this genre.