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PDF è The Map That Changed the World: William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology ⚟ In , a canal digger named William Smith made a startling discovery He found that by tracing the placement of fossils, which he uncovered in his excavations, one could follow layers of rocks as they dipped and rose and fell clear across England and, indeed, clear across the world making it possible, for the first time ever, to draw a chart of the hidden underside of the earth Determined to expose what he realized was the landscape s secret fourth dimension, Smith spent twenty two years piecing together the fragments of this unseen universe to create an epochal and remarkably beautiful hand painted map But instead of receiving accolades and honors, he ended up in debtors prison, the victim of plagiarism, and virtually homeless for ten years Finally, in , this quiet genius now known as the father of modern geology received the Geological Society of London s highest award and King William IV offered him a lifetime pension The Map That Changed the World is a very human tale of endurance and achievement, of one man s dedication in the face of ruin With a keen eye and thoughtful detail, Simon Winchester unfolds the poignant sacrifice behind this world changing discovery This is truly a beautifull homage for a man who gained recognition for his work very late in his own life This is a scientific non fiction book, but the way it is told it reads like a great adventure novel of the quest towards a geological map , which is in my opinion has been a very good choice to tell the story Also it is obvious that the author is a fan of William Smith and his work which made this a very happy book to read because the author has so much compassions for Smith s trials.Beca This is truly a beautifull homage for a man who gained recognition for his work very late in his own life This is a scientific non fiction book, but the way it is told it reads like a great adventure novel of the quest towards a geological map , which is in my opinion has been a very good choice to tell the story Also it is obvious that the author is a fan of William Smith and his work which made this a very happy book to read because the author has so much compassions for Smith s trials.Because of its adventurous vibe this book is very accesible also for readers who do not know anything about geology like me I do not pretend I understood the whole book, but thetechnicial parts I could easily skip in favour of the story.So recommended for everyone with a general like for science maps geology or everyone who loves a story with an adventurous, altough a bit naive, protagenist, betrayal and a fitting reward at the end for the good guy This is the third Winchester book I ve read in quick succession and I m almost tempted to say that they just get better and better except they probably don t I think they are all equally good This one is about the father of English Geology If the advance of knowledge really does depend on the geniuses who can see patterns where for the rest of us see only chaos then William Smith is precisely that kind of genius a man who gets it and forever changes how we see the world.I ll admit it This is the third Winchester book I ve read in quick succession and I m almost tempted to say that they just get better and better except they probably don t I think they are all equally good This one is about the father of English Geology If the advance of knowledge really does depend on the geniuses who can see patterns where for the rest of us see only chaos then William Smith is precisely that kind of genius a man who gets it and forever changes how we see the world.I ll admit it I m partial to stories where the good guy wins out in the end particularly after being faced with absurd odds I even like stories where the guy gets the girl or vice versa And this book does end happily even after except I didn t come away from this book feeling particularly good about humanity Especially not that section of humanity that is the upper class As Winchester says during the book, it was almost as if the rich felt Smith needed to be taught a lesson for having the audacity of being both lower class and having worked out the secrets of geology before his betters.Why is it that so often if one person has power over another person the favourite game of those with power is humiliation Smith was remarkably lucky in many respects I mean, he ended up with a pension and with general respect but for years he suffered and virtually no one lifted a finger to help him And isn t that the problem with systems of patronage Even when all is done as stipulated and required one is left dangling at the whim of the patron The humiliations Smith had to endure most evident with the treatment meted out to him around the forced sale of his precious fossil collection and the costs to him of these humiliations I mean costs in the literal sense and not just to his pride were truly staggering If you think the world is about 6000 years old I really couldn t recommend this book to you but then, besides the Bible, I couldn t recommend any book to you For everyone else, this really is an intensely interesting and deeply moving work I ve said it before how is it possible that none of this guy s books have been made into TV programmes I ve heard his talking books and I reckon he could be the David Attenborough of Geology and Lexicography And if there is one thing the world definitely needs it isDavid Attenboroughs Come on BBC get your finger out The official blurb says it the best In 1793, a canal digger named William Smith made a startling discovery He found that by tracing the placement of fossils, which he uncovered in his excavations, one could follow layers of rocks as they dipped and rose and fell clear across England and, indeed, clear across the world making it possible, for the first time ever, to draw a chart of the hidden underside of the earth Determined to expose what he realized was the landscape s secret fourt The official blurb says it the best In 1793, a canal digger named William Smith made a startling discovery He found that by tracing the placement of fossils, which he uncovered in his excavations, one could follow layers of rocks as they dipped and rose and fell clear across England and, indeed, clear across the world making it possible, for the first time ever, to draw a chart of the hidden underside of the earth Determined to expose what he realized was the landscape s secret fourth dimension, Smith spent twenty two years piecing together the fragments of this unseen universe to create an epochal and remarkably beautiful hand painted map But instead of receiving accolades and honors, he ended up in debtors prison, the victim of plagiarism, and virtually homeless for ten yearsFinally, in 1831, this quiet genius now known as the father of modern geology received the Geological Society of London s highest award and King William IV offered him a lifetime pension The Map That Changed the World is a very human tale of endurance and achievement, of one man s dedication in the face of ruin With a keen eye and thoughtful detail, Simon Winchester unfolds the poignant sacrifice behind this world changing discovery MY COMMENTS Simon Winchester had William Smith s diaries to help him compile this detailed account of one man s struggle to open up the science of stratigraphy geology What should have been a joyous discovery, turned into one man s ceaseless war against his own humiliation and ill fortune, forced to waste his energies raging against the cheating and class discrimination that seemed, time and again, to frustrate him.The author kept the interest in the tale alive with his conversational tone throughout Statements like these, brought a smile to my faceIt was left to the genial Irish prelate James Ussher, while he was bishop of Armagh, to fix the date with absolute precision According to his workings, which he managed to convince his clerical colleagues were impeccably accurate, God had created the world and all its creatures in one swift and uninterrupted process of divine mechanics that began on the dot of the all too decent hour of 9 A.M., on a Monday, October 23, 4004 B.C Suffice to say, William Smith s birth, on March 23, 1769, in the cottage on the edge of the green in Churchill, Oxfordshire, took place, according to their implacably held beliefs, exactly 5,772 years, four months, and sixteen days after the creation of the world He was the first son of the local blacksmith in the hamlet of Churchill.It is within this social mileu that William Smith, with his interest in fossils and rocks, would draw up the first geological map of England and change the world of science foreverIt was a document that was to change the face of a science indeed, to create a whole new science to set in train a series of scientific movements that would lead, eventually, to the inquiries of Charles Darwin, to the birth of evolutionary theory, and to the burgeoning of an entirely new way for human beings to view their world and their universe The inevitable collision between the new rationally based world of science and the old ecclesiastical, faith directed world of belief was about to occur and in the vanguard of the new movement, both symbolically and actually, was the great map, and now this equally enormous atlas that John Cary of the Strand was about to publish, and the revolutionary thinking that lay behind their making A fascinating biography of a brilliant man He did not have class, or money, or the right address, but he had the nerve to persist and win Captivating Entertaining Excellent To view a bigger version of the map CLICK HERE This book turned out to be something that I wasn t much interested in after all But, it was interesting none the less It was well researched and well written and deserved a better rating, maybe by someone interested in geology.It was about Englishman William Smith who was a common man with no wealth or title He dedicated his life to mapping the underground of England during the Age of Enlightenment His findings became very beneficial to the economy of England, but he gained little fame or f This book turned out to be something that I wasn t much interested in after all But, it was interesting none the less It was well researched and well written and deserved a better rating, maybe by someone interested in geology.It was about Englishman William Smith who was a common man with no wealth or title He dedicated his life to mapping the underground of England during the Age of Enlightenment His findings became very beneficial to the economy of England, but he gained little fame or fortune because of his class status He ended up in debtors prison and only afterwards did he get the recognition he deserved Then came the collision of religious beliefs and scientific reasoning with the discovery of fossils