( Read Book ) ñ My Life as an Indian: The Story of a Red Woman and a White Man in the Lodges of the Blackfeet (1907) è eBook or Kindle ePUB free

( Read Book ) ¹ My Life as an Indian: The Story of a Red Woman and a White Man in the Lodges of the Blackfeet (1907) Þ Fascinating, firsthand memoir of a young white man s life among the Piegan Blackfeet in Montana Territory Includes detailed accounts of religious ceremonies and customs, child rearing, food preparation, tanning buffalo hides, war parties, raids, and much else Of great interest to ethnologists and students of Native American history First published in , My Life as an Indian is the memoir of J W Schultz s life as a young white man among the Piegan Blackfeet in the Montana Territory Out of curiosity and in search of adventure, Schultz went west and became a trapper and trader He was inspired by the journals of Lewis and Clark and George Catlin s Oregon Trail, but found a wholly different source of inspiration when he met the Blackfeet and quickly settled into their lifestyle, even taking a Blackfoot woman for his wife and riding along with the men on buffalo hunts and wars with neighboring tribesContentsI Fort Benton II The Ruse Of A Savage Lover III The Tragedy Of The Marias IV A War Trip For Horses V Days With The Game VI The Story Of The Crow Woman VII A White Buffalo VIII A Winter On The Marias IX I Have A Lodge Of My Own X The Killing Of A Bear XI The Kutenai s Story XII The Great Race XIII The Snake Woman XIV The Snake Woman s Quest XV I Return To My People XVI The Story Of Rising Wolf XVII A Friendly Visit From The Crows XVIII A Raid By The Crows XIX Nat ah ki s Wedding XX THE Attack On The Hunters XXI Never laughs Goes East XXII The War Trip Of Queer Person XXIII The Piegans Move In XXIV A Wolverine s Medicine XXV Little Deer s End XXVI The Ways Of The Northland XXVII The Story Of Ancient SleeperXXVIII Diana s Marriage XXIX A Game Of Fate XXX Trade, Hunt And War Party XXXI Nat ah ki s Ride XXXII Curbing The WanderersXXXIII Crees And Red Rivers XXXIV The Last Of The Buffalo XXXV The Winter Of Death XXXVI The Black Robe s Help XXXVII Later Years This book published inhas been reformatted for the Kindle and may contain an occasional defect from the original publication or from the reformatting read it several times and absolutely loved it This book is the literary equivalent of the Taj Mahal it was written as a memorial to the author s beloved wife The original title was My Life as an Indian, the Story of a Red Woman and a White Man in the Lodges of the Blackfeet , which seems muchappropriate knowing the reason for which it was written After the first few introductory chapters, the author and his wife become an inseparable couple who share their adventures throughout the rest of the book As the introduction forewarns, This book is the literary equivalent of the Taj Mahal it was written as a memorial to the author s beloved wife The original title was My Life as an Indian, the Story of a Red Woman and a White Man in the Lodges of the Blackfeet , which seems muchappropriate knowing the reason for which it was written After the first few introductory chapters, the author and his wife become an inseparable couple who share their adventures throughout the rest of the book As the introduction forewarns, however, the ending is not a happy one It was only after his wife s death that the author began writing about her and the time they had together I could tell, especially towards the end, that the author was also trying to set straight some of the politically correct history that had then been propagated concerning the conflict between the red and white men over the plains of Montana Throughout this book, the author points out the good and the evil of both peoples He contrasted the greedy Blackfoot warriors who were cruel to their wives, as well as the Blackfoot husbands who honored and loved their women He told of his own adventures with wicked tribesmen, as well as his many deep, lasting friendships with others from those same tribes From his perspective he also explained the corrupt politics of the government agents that caused so many Blackfoot men, women, and children to starve once they were placed on their reservation He also tells of the greed of the cattle ranchers who took so much from the native Americans by riding the coattails of government conquest I only give five stars to books that I would actively recommend to friends as something they must read That being said, I would select this book not only as a must read, but I would want to give it as a wedding gift to any young couple instead of giving one of those silly marriage books that most people think will help their marriage Here is a story that can t be argued against, because we know how well it ended Here is a story that cannot be twisted, as so many of those marriage books get twisted, because it is written not as an instruction manual for couples, but as an example of two lovers who did marriage well Within this tale are also many illustrations of human nature, both good and bad, as the author interacted with the Native Americans and the European settlers on the plains of Montana There is a lot of wisdom in here, hidden in the guise of good storytelling and exciting adventures I must add that, though this book was writtenthan a hundred years ago, it is still incredibly relevant to today s sophisticated readers Humans are humans, whether they are living in a tent on the untamed prairie or in a metropolitan penthouse Women still argue when they live together I ve learned this first hand Men still seek adventure and conquest in untamed lands only now it s usually digital Wives will still be made to feel inferior, insecure, and unattractive a husband still needs to spend time with his woman, to communicate with them, and to let them know that they are still the pretty woman in his life And marriage is still not about legal documents or sacred vows it is still the commitment each makes to themselves to remain at their lover s side through thick and thin, until death separates I enjoyed this book, written sort of like a journal with every chapter a story in itself yet sequenced About life among the Blackfoot, Piegan on the plains and eastern part of the Rockies in Montana and southern Canada Very similar happenings to many of the plains Indians toward the end of the Buffalo The abundance of game and buffalo up till the extermination of them and also the changes with trade, reservations, Indian agents that were crooked, and the end of a free life style Great story I enjoyed this book, written sort of like a journal with every chapter a story in itself yet sequenced About life among the Blackfoot, Piegan on the plains and eastern part of the Rockies in Montana and southern Canada Very similar happenings to many of the plains Indians toward the end of the Buffalo The abundance of game and buffalo up till the extermination of them and also the changes with trade, reservations, Indian agents that were crooked, and the end of a free life style Great story telling of his experiences Fascinating memoirs of a white man who lived among the Piegan Blackfeet native tribe The book is a well written easy read, I was surprising to discover, in a book first published in 1907, a narrative so direct and fluid, devoid of old fashion jargon.The exciting adventures of the protagonist as a young man have an underlining of sadness for the fate of the natives, which have lost their land and quite often their life to the white man At times Shultz seemed to me a bit of a hypocrite, ready to Fascinating memoirs of a white man who lived among the Piegan Blackfeet native tribe The book is a well written easy read, I was surprising to discover, in a book first published in 1907, a narrative so direct and fluid, devoid of old fashion jargon.The exciting adventures of the protagonist as a young man have an underlining of sadness for the fate of the natives, which have lost their land and quite often their life to the white man At times Shultz seemed to me a bit of a hypocrite, ready to distantiate himself from most of the blame for his past as trader he freely admits taking advantage of the natives ignorance , by pointing to the US government officials and other parties as the worst offenders In general, despite his assurances, I didn t develop a high opinion of Shultz as a person, he was prepared to view spoiler leave his woman without an explanation, while promising her to return The fact that he coundn t stay away and later return to her didn t change the substance of the matter for me In addition, I didn t like the practice of poisoning of wolves and other wildlife, as well as the procuring of a dog for the Crows feast hide spoiler However, I believe that his regrets and love of the native people were genuine I found many of the episodes in his retelling touching and moving, for instance the story of the Crow woman view spoiler whose husband is killed in a raid and she becomes the wife of the chief of the enemy tribe hide spoiler , the one of the old man from Kutenai tribe view spoiler who get captured and becomes a slave until a girl helps him escape hide spoiler , the snake woman s view spoiler who looks for her husband for months until she identifies his killer by her husband s horse hide spoiler and the romantic No heart But the best and the most heart rending was the story of The Lark wife of gambling Fisher A very enjoyable read, informative about native customs and culture Highly recommended.Fav QuotesWhat manner of men were those soldiers who deliberately shot down defenceless women and innocent children They had not even the excuse of being drunk nor was their commanding officer intoxicated nor were they excited, or in any danger whatever Deliberately, coolly, with steady and deadly aim, they shot them down, killed the wounded, and then tried to burn the bodies of their victims But I will say noabout it think it over yourself and try to find a fit name for men who did this.It was not allowable for a Blackfoot to meet his mother in law I fancy that there are many white men who would rejoice if such a custom prevailed in civilised society Among the Blackfeet a man could never visit the lodge of his mother in law, she could not enter his lodge when he was at home, both were obliged to go far out of the way, to endure any discomfort, in order to avoid meeting at any time and place.