&EBOOK ☋ Secular Scripture: A Study of the Structure of Romance ☔ Ebook or Kindle ePUB free

As is typical with Northrop Frye, The Secular Scripture represents a highly systematized, anatomical approach to literature, in this case specifically the genre of romance Frye again typically defines romance very broadly, so that it encompasses a great deal of popular literature he mentions science fiction in particular again and again as a modern descendant of traditional romance, and explores elements derived from romance inrealist literature as well The underlying premise of As is typical with Northrop Frye, The Secular Scripture represents a highly systematized, anatomical approach to literature, in this case specifically the genre of romance Frye again typically defines romance very broadly, so that it encompasses a great deal of popular literature he mentions science fiction in particular again and again as a modern descendant of traditional romance, and explores elements derived from romance inrealist literature as well The underlying premise of Frye s study is a relatively commonplace one that the whole genre romance, and other fiction derived directly or indirectly from romance tropes, can be understood as the working out of a few basic motifs which undergird everything from the narratives of the Old Testament to the myths of ancient Greece and ancient India to Arthurian legends, etc In laying out his iteration of this conventional approach to traditional stories, Frye focuses especially on the nature of the heroes and heroines of myth and romance, and on motifs of ascent from a lower world to a higher or world and of descent from a higher world to a lower world Where Frye is somewhatinnovative is in his ingenious application of this kind of folkloric archetypal analysis torealistic fiction He shows howsophisticated, less naive romance and even realist fiction frequently takes motifs from myth or fable two terms which have specific technical meanings for Frye and naturalize or rationalize them what Frye calls displacement This ingenious approach is, however, also one of the two major weaknesses in Frye s book, as a number of his examples becomethan a bit strained For instance, he is certainly right to see a connection between the chthonic elements in Alice s Adventures in Wonderland the earliest version of which was, notably, titled Alice s Adventures under Ground and romance mythological ideas of the underworld, but his claim that the motif of cards is connected with themes of descent into a world of fatality pg 156 is hard not to see as reading too much into what is probably incidental or even accidental My other criticism is that, especially in the last chapter, Frye makes a number of statements and assessments that are clearly ideologically motivated, but refuses to make clear what his own viewpoint is, making his value judgments hard to assess It struck me in particular that there are a few comments in that last chapter that might be mistaken for anti Christian by someone who did not know that Frye was an ordained minister He comes across as trying to strike a balance between being detached and analytical and being morally responsible, but the attempt to have it both ways only muddies the waters at several fairly important junctures As with all of Frye s work, it is a mixture between wonderful and horrible Often he makes great observations coming from a perspective that is completely backwards to reality He says much about the Bible as literature, but assumes that it is only literature instead of history, and has an annoying tendency to refer to apocryphal stories as though they were as authortitative as Scripture itself coming, no doubt, from his assumption that both are on equal footing literarily So some worldview d As with all of Frye s work, it is a mixture between wonderful and horrible Often he makes great observations coming from a perspective that is completely backwards to reality He says much about the Bible as literature, but assumes that it is only literature instead of history, and has an annoying tendency to refer to apocryphal stories as though they were as authortitative as Scripture itself coming, no doubt, from his assumption that both are on equal footing literarily So some worldview discresion is advised, but if you can get beyond that, the book opens up into a wonderful exploration of literature There is much fruit here for the Biblically minded.He argues that the genre of romance is at once wide and narrow He doesn t mean by romance the sort of book you would find in the romance section at Barnes and Noble By romance he means all stories that form an imaginative and mythological matrix that includes stories of mistaken identities, mysterious births, adventures, the hero s journey, shipwrecks, magic potions, the rescue of maidens in distress, etc This would include genres such as horror, science fiction, and fantasy, as well asclassical literature Many critics disdain such stories, despite their continued popularity by people, and Frye believes they should indeed be takenseriously than they have in the past.The question of why such stories continue to be popular is raised, but his explanation left me ill satisfied Rather, for the Biblical Christian, these stories continue to be popular because they tap into reality For the Christian, the world is not limited to what is seen, to matter and energy alone The universe is an open system the Spirit is always pouring into it and Christ is the glue that binds all things together The conventions of romance as Frye understands it strike a chord deep in our hearts These stories resound in us because they are shadows of the greatest romance of all time the Christian romance, which features miracles, mysterious births, mistaken identities, ship wrecks, the rescue of maidens and the waging of war against the Dragon To the Christian these are really real aspects of what others call mundane life I think if we take Frye s structures and Joseph Campbell s for that matter in this way, our understanding of stories and how they work will increase bountifully This book is a delight to read The use of Frye s language and the subtle, dry wit that punctuates his analysis of romance makes it as enjoyable as it is thought provoking Frye traces the history of the romance, explores its development and demonstrates its literary and cultural importance.This little book has many points to make, some of which seem so obvious, after reading, the reader cannot help but exclaim Of course, why didn t I think of that His very brief reference to coincidence onl This book is a delight to read The use of Frye s language and the subtle, dry wit that punctuates his analysis of romance makes it as enjoyable as it is thought provoking Frye traces the history of the romance, explores its development and demonstrates its literary and cultural importance.This little book has many points to make, some of which seem so obvious, after reading, the reader cannot help but exclaim Of course, why didn t I think of that His very brief reference to coincidence only one and half pages is a case in point My only regret is that I did not read this book years ago, but then again, it is probablyappreciated with the experience that comes with age If you want to be able to read fiction deeply , this is a good book for you However, be warned that the author often takes the long way around to defend his points, so it s easy to get lost if you have to stop reading in the middle of a chapter He does provide a lot of literary examples to illustrate his points, but if you re not familiar with the books he s using, you might not appreciate them It s a good companion book to The Hero with a Thousand Faces. The Secular Scripture offers a free wheeling discussion of the different forms Romantic narratives take and why the forms epic verse, chanson, play, opera, novel matter to the meanings of the works and to the concept of Romance itself His wide ranging exploration includes Classical Greek and Roman drama, William Golding, Benjamin Franklin, the stories of O Henry, and The Magic Flute Frye s digression into the differences between the erotic and the pornographic is entertaining. An excellent read Something addictive about literary analysis There are countless parallels made to Biblical scripture and Frye analyzes many different works in his piece Some big themes emerge in his discussion, he dwells on them briefly and then departs Some of these themes are surprising, and mentioned eloquently but in a cryptically passive way I like this book because it s imaginative and hope to finish some of his other books. I ve re read this recently A brilliant and insightful exploration of the history of popular story telling the sublime the smutty the recurring themes the magical coincidental recognitions and resolutions and so on Think of The Tempest or The Menaechmi, but written by Chaucer or the Brothers Grimm on a good day. &EBOOK ↵ Secular Scripture: A Study of the Structure of Romance ☟ Northrop Frye s thinking has had a pervasive impact on contemporary interpretations of our literary and cultural heritage In his Anatomy of Criticism, a landmark in the history of modern critical theory, he demonstrated his genius for mapping out the realm of imaginative creation In The Secular Scripture he turns again to the task of establishing a broad theoretical framework, bringing to bear his extraordinary command of the whole range of literature from antiquity to the presentRomance, a mode of literature trafficking in such plot elements as mistaken identity, shipwrecks, magic potions, the rescue of maidens in distress, has tended to be regarded as hardly deserving of serious consideration critics praise other aspects of the Odyssey, The Faerie Queene, Shakespeare s last plays, and Scott s Waverley novels, for example, while forgiving the authors indulgence in childishly romantic plots Frye, however, discerns in the innumerable romantic narratives of the Western tradition an imaginative universe stretching from an idyllic world to a demonic one, and a pattern of action taking the form of a cyclical descent into and ascent out of the demonic realm Romance as a whole is thus seen as forming an integrated vision of the world, a secular scripture whose hero is man, paralleling the sacred scripture whose hero is GodThe clarity of Northrop Frye s perception, the scope and suggestiveness of his conceptualizing, the wit and grace of his style, have won him universal admiration Wise, insightful work which analyzes the social and cultural functions of the romance form Philosophical and meditative, I would recommend Frye s book to anyone with an interest in narratives, literary theory, and a desire for earnest self reflection. All I d like to say is that some of the Greek romances Frye mentions are quiet difficult to find Get on that, publishing world I know Penguin put out a thing of Greek novels a year or so ago but why do things in half measure Come on.