*Free Kindle ⇦ John O'Hara's Hollywood ↶ Ebook or Kindle ePUB free

As many are probably aware, John O Hara was an incredibly prolific short story author from late 1920s up until his death in 1970 Nearly 250 of O Hara s short stories were published in The New Yorker magazine, making him their most published author, by far O Hara s short story collections were focused on the fictional eastern Pennsylvania town of Gibbsville, New York City, and then Hollywood, California Currently, there are published collections of O Hara s short stories in all three locales, As many are probably aware, John O Hara was an incredibly prolific short story author from late 1920s up until his death in 1970 Nearly 250 of O Hara s short stories were published in The New Yorker magazine, making him their most published author, by far O Hara s short story collections were focused on the fictional eastern Pennsylvania town of Gibbsville, New York City, and then Hollywood, California Currently, there are published collections of O Hara s short stories in all three locales, two of which Hollywood and New York City are available in Kindle editions.This review focuses on the collection of short stories that are all associated with Hollywood, the studios, film lots, bedrooms, and the men and women involved in the industry There were several stories that were truly standouts in this collection in my opinion, including The Way to Majorca, Malibu from the Sky, Everything Satisfactory, In a Grove freaky and violent , Yucca Knolls, and Natica Jackson What they all share is O Hara s mastery of taut dialog among characters As you read one of his stories it is as though you are utterly transported and set down in the room with the characters and listening to the conversation first hand.These stories very effectively resonate with the film noirish atmosphere of the Los Angeles and Hollywood that I ve come to associate and appreciate from writers like Dashiell Hammett and now even James Ellroy Good stuff, folks, and well worth searching out for a read Solid 4 of five stars for me John O Hara was one of the most successful American authors of his generation O Hara rose to fame during the 1930 s through his short stories in The New Yorker, and from his first two novels, Appointment in Samarra, and BUtterfield 8 O Hara spent varying amounts of time in Hollywood from 1934 and 1955 as a screenwriter, and his time in California informed the short stories in the 2007 collection John O Hara s Hollywood The book collects all of O Hara s 22 stories about Hollywood and the movie John O Hara was one of the most successful American authors of his generation O Hara rose to fame during the 1930 s through his short stories in The New Yorker, and from his first two novels, Appointment in Samarra, and BUtterfield 8 O Hara spent varying amounts of time in Hollywood from 1934 and 1955 as a screenwriter, and his time in California informed the short stories in the 2007 collection John O Hara s Hollywood The book collects all of O Hara s 22 stories about Hollywood and the movies It s an excellent collection for fans of O Hara s writing, but it s not without its faults Most of O Hara s early short stories from the 1930 s and 1940 s were very short, with many being under 1,000 words O Hara was a master at creating a mood in just a few words in these super short stories O Hara s stories don t really have endings that resolve the story they just suddenly come to a halt In this way, they capture the rhythm of real life Personally, I found the early short stories in John O Hara s Hollywood to be the most interesting I thought that some of his later stories from the 1960 s were just too long and lacked narrative drive The longest stories in the book are Yucca Knolls, James Francis and the Star, and Natica Jackson, and those are the three stories I found most disposable They range from 50 80 pages in length, and they re overly reliant on dialogue Not much happens in them, and it seems that the only reason they are so long is just because they could be O Hara also seems stuck in the past in these stories, as they re hash the 1920 s and 1930 s, the decades which he was most comfortable writing about The last piece in the book is one of the most fascinating it s a non fiction piece titled Hello Hollywood Goodbye, that O Hara wrote in 1968 for the magazine Holiday Unfortunately, the introduction doesn t mention it at all, so we don t get much context for this piece From what I know about O Hara s writings, it was fairly unusual for him to write an autobiographical non fiction essay John O Hara s Hollywood was edited by Matthew J Bruccoli, the leading scholar of John O Hara and F Scott Fitzgerald Bruccoli s introduction is excellent, but someone in the proof reading department was asleep at the wheel, as the introduction states that F Scott Fitzgerald wrote What Makes Sammy Run and The Disenchanted, while Budd Schulberg wrote The Love of the Last Tycoon A Western, when it s actually the other way around I noticed some interesting things as I read John O Hara s Hollywood, and one of them is that O Hara really had a thing for fake movie titles with the word strange in them In The Magical Numbers the fake biopic of President John Tyler is called Strange President p.22 Strange Courage is the movie the actor in Adventure on the Set has just finished p.27 Strange Virgin is the name of the movie that Kenyon Littlejohn is making a test for in Drawing Room B, p.49 , and it s also the name of the movie, adapted from a novel, being made in The Industry and the Professor p.62 I wondered if all these fake movies with strange in the title was supposed to be an in joke for movie fans Were there a lot of movies with strange in the title being made in the 1930 s and 1940 s O Hara might be making some in jokes as he re uses some character names in different stories The Answer Depends name checks Sidney Gainsborough, who appears in the first story in the book, Mr Sidney Gainsborough Quality Pictures The fictional actress Doris Arlington is mentioned in The Answer Depends, Yucca Knolls, and James Francis and the Star John O Hara was a very interesting writer He was clearly gifted with superb and sensitive abilities to capture the way people talked, thought, and felt, but yet in his personal life he had a knack for pissing off nearly everyone he met Of course, he s not the only great writer who also had a difficult personality O Hara had a keen sense of class and status in America, and he had a large inferiority complex about having never attended college Ernest Hemingway supposedly once made the joke that he was collecting funds to send O Hara to Yale The sad part is, O Hara might have taken Hemingway up on his offer Obsessed with Yale life, O Hara badgered the university to give him an honorary degree Yale declined, because O Hara was graceless enough to ask for the degree O Hara also made no secret of his desire to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature Of course, he never got it O Hara finally quit drinking in the mid 1950 s, and he became a muchprolific author, publishing 10 novels and 7 short story collections between 1955 and his death in 1970 He became a famous and wealthy author, and he gloried in the social signifiers that his status afforded him, as he drove a Rolls Royce and an MG convertible with his monogram on the door.O Hara still holds the record for the most short stories published in The New Yorker, with an incredible 247 Along with those two other Johns, Cheever and Updike, O Hara became synonymous with The New Yorker and the sophisticated short stories found between its covers At his best, John O Hara was a superb chronicler of American life and culture, and John O Hara s Hollywood presents some of his best work What a strange and seedy place Hollywood is John O Hara s Hollywood, anyway A weird little bubble world full of hedonistic, narcissistic people with very odd attitudes to sex and life and the world and other people These stories fall into two main groups those from the 30s and 40s, which are mostly very short, some not muchthan vignettes, mostly originally published in The New Yorker and those from the 60s and one from the early 70s , significantly longer, one Natica Jackson What a strange and seedy place Hollywood is John O Hara s Hollywood, anyway A weird little bubble world full of hedonistic, narcissistic people with very odd attitudes to sex and life and the world and other people These stories fall into two main groups those from the 30s and 40s, which are mostly very short, some not muchthan vignettes, mostly originally published in The New Yorker and those from the 60s and one from the early 70s , significantly longer, one Natica Jackson nearly novella length, several of which were originally published in The Saturday Evening Post, mostly looking back at Hollywood s golden age, but with a sceptical eye not much clouded by nostalgia The stories are sharp and observant, a useful corrective to the glossy, glamourous view of Hollywood it likes to offer us of itself, from someone who worked successfully in Hollywood but never lost his footing outside that hermetically sealed little world, unlike so many of his characters here This short story collection from the wonderful John O Hara is so difficult for me to rate Shortly after I began the early short magazine pieces, I debated stopping and finding something else to read Then, because the dialogue was so beautifully done he writes exceptional dialogue , I continued with a fewthinking that I would finish reading it, but that I likely wouldn t review it because it wasn t a GoodRead That s when I arrived at the longer pieces, and I was held in a trance Ea This short story collection from the wonderful John O Hara is so difficult for me to rate Shortly after I began the early short magazine pieces, I debated stopping and finding something else to read Then, because the dialogue was so beautifully done he writes exceptional dialogue , I continued with a fewthinking that I would finish reading it, but that I likely wouldn t review it because it wasn t a GoodRead That s when I arrived at the longer pieces, and I was held in a trance Early on, it was difficult for me to understand what the writer was trying to do I understand slice of life stories, but these wereof a sliver I didn t have time to identify with any of the characters, and I barely uncoveredthan one piece of action before the tale ended With the longer stories, though, all of that changed O Hara s stories were still slice of life pieces, yet they conveyed so much I ve read many books about Hollywood in this period, and most retold the famous incidents that became Hollywood lore O Hara isn t interested in that By allowing to Reader to overhear conversations between people at many levels of the Dream Factory hierarchy, he was creating an intensely vivid picture Many times, I had the strong sense of being there, and references to famous and infamous incidents in other books suddenly came alive I was an Insider The best of the longer stories in my estimation were Yucca Knolls James Francis and the Star Natica Jackson The Way to Majorca The Sun Room These stories easily kept pace with Fitzgerald s PAT HOBBY STORIES and THE LAST TYCOON In fact, Natica Jackson was by far my favorite in the collection and I sincerely doubt that I ll ever get its imagery out of my head I should probably have given the entire book a 5 star rating just for its inclusion The book concludes with a coda from O Hara called, Hello Hollywood Good Bye In it, he gives a brief overview of some of the incidents that were not included because they happened to him, not to his characters This overview gives substance to his love mistrust relationship with Hollywood, and establishes that it will likely hold onto a part of his future life He had provided such vivid views in his stories that the atmosphere of the place even bled into his personal retelling I was sorry when JOHN O HARA S HOLLYWOOD ended There had to have been so manystories that he could tell, and I would have stayed with him to read them If you begin reading this one and wonder what it has to do with anything, hang on until the appearance of Yucca Knolls From that point on and that is the majority of the book , you are in for quite a ride These were fantastic Stories of trashy people having lots of sex, written with great empathy and care I really should be readingO Hara. Very fine.Micro short stories some about three pages.All set in Hollywood the town, the industry, the one industry town.Acutely observed Good ear for dialogue O Hara likes to write things the way people pernounce thum Master of the non ending ending.The guy knew his stuff. *Free Kindle ⇹ John O'Hara's Hollywood ☠ On the sound stage and the casting couch, behind the facades of Spanish style mansions and inside studio trailers, at costumes and makeup, in posh nightclubs and in backrooms filled with cigar smoke, here are the ruthless producers, over the hill directors, disillusioned writers, glamorously callous actresses, desperate and hungry starlets, and matinee idols with dark secrets as they are unsparingly observed by one of America s most popular masters of realism Best known for the now classicnovel Appointment in Samarra and such blockbuster bestsellers as Ten North Frederick and Butterfield , in a career spanning four decades John O Hara also published numerous story collections Among his finest work, they highlight qualities that sold thanmillion copies of his books in the course of his career the snappy dialogue, the telling detail, the ironic narrative twist Like the novels, and like the much praised collection of John O Hara s Gibbsville stories, also edited by Matthew J Bruccoli, the selections in John O Hara s Hollywood, many originally appearing in the New Yorker or the Saturday Evening Post, explore the materialist aspirations and sexual exploits of flawed, prodigally human characters for whom arrangements consitute a deal and compromises pass for love