!Book ♶ The Land Leviathan ⚆ PDF or E-pub free

!Book ♷ The Land Leviathan ♠ A brand new edition of the second novel in Moorcock s acclaimed steampunk seriesOswald Bastable visits an alternateHere, he discovers that most of the Western world has been devastated by a short, yet horrific, war fought with futuristic devices and biological weapons An Afro American Black Attila is conquering the remnants of the Western nations, destroyed by the wars, in an attempt to bring civilization and social order Entertaining in a modest way but certainly not his best work. I have sometimes wondered what social stability is It is probably just a question of points of view and personal experience.This is pretty similar to the first installment, the multiverse is myriad and the alternate history stumbled upon has wonky technology and world wide race war rife with biological weapons and ritual torture There was hasty aspect to this, a few ideas are given flesh and then insert some gruesome battle scenes There was a philosophical dimension to this one. Michael Moorcock s second novel starring Cpt Oswald Bastable is a rushed and rather confused handling of a very compelling theme This is only the second complete work by Moorcock that I ve read this book s prequel, The Warlord of the Air, being the first I originally became aware of Moorcock through his collaborations with the space rock band Hawkwind What first struck me about the Oswald Bastable novels is how deliberately antiquated they are the language and mannerisms of the character Michael Moorcock s second novel starring Cpt Oswald Bastable is a rushed and rather confused handling of a very compelling theme This is only the second complete work by Moorcock that I ve read this book s prequel, The Warlord of the Air, being the first I originally became aware of Moorcock through his collaborations with the space rock band Hawkwind What first struck me about the Oswald Bastable novels is how deliberately antiquated they are the language and mannerisms of the characters would not be out of place in one of Edgar Rice Burroughs s earlier works Bastable reminds me significantly of a pre Warlord of Mars status John Carter , and this approach is generally quite charming What surprised me, however, is how paternalistic and, frankly, bigoted Bastable s take on an alternative historical situation often is This especially surprised me coming from an author firmly aligned with the 60 s 70 s counterculture, who has described himself on many occasions as an anarchist, and who has even called out authors like Robert Heinlein for their authoritarian or patriarchal stances.Shortly after finishing this book, I read a bit about the origins of the Bastable character, who was originally created by author Edith Nesbit, a member of the Fabian Society who believed that social change and revolution must be brought about by gradual ideological change within societies Though Moorcock s Bastable is significantly different than Nesbit s, this information greatly helps to contextualize Moorcock s character His views on society are typical of an enlightened European of the early 1900 s, and these views are consistently challenged by the upended circumstances of the alternate realities in which he finds himself.This journey towards social awareness was quite compelling in The Warlord of the Air, but it is rather hackneyed in The Land Leviathan Cicero Hood, a.k.a The Black Attila, is the central antagonist of the novel, a warlord who dreams of liberating the black peoples of earth and delivering an inevitable comeuppance to their white masters Bastable fluctuates in his opinions of Hood and his empire multiple times throughout the novel, and in a longer work, this crisis of conscience could well have been fascinating Here, however, everything feels quite rushed and one dimensional Bastable s obvious discomfort at being treated as a lesser being by Hood and his countrymen is doubtlessly meant to reflect the feelings experienced by minorities in Western society, but I have the distinct feeling that the average reader would take these scenes at face value and begin to view Bastable, and by extension even Moorcock, as a sort of apologist for imperialism with little perspective on racial issues As I mentioned above, the knowledge that Moorcock named his protagonist after a character created by an enthusiastic member of the basically righteous but misguided Fabian Society helps to put everything into perspective this is Moorcock s countercultural 1970 s vision written in the style and voice of a relatively liberal English officer of the early 1900 s However, the book is so short and lacking of any serious contemplation on this complex issues that the reader could be forgiven for failing to realize this Ultimately, this book would have functioned much better as either a short, simple adventure story or as a longer,philosophical work of speculative fiction As such, Moorcock attempts to have it both ways, with disappointing results.With that said, I m still intrigued enough to read the final book of the Bastable trilogy, The Steel Tsar. Unexpectedly smart, a grim but witty bit of afrofuturism blended with alt history. Hugely enjoyable time jumping alternative universe from Moorcock This time moving from a Gandhi led South Africa to an African war on America. Excellent sequel to The Warlord of The Air which continues the adventures of Oswald Bastable In this one, a USA that has re introduced slavery faces an African warlord out for revenge. There are a few similarities with the previous Bastable book but there s a littlemoral ambiguity in this one.Fun and fast paced. This is the second volume in Moorcock s Oswald Bastable trilogy, the Nomad of the Timestreams, an alternate history, post apocalyptic, steampunk before it was a thing series of adventures It follows The Warlord of the Air and precedes The Steel Tsar This one suffers from the middle book syndrome a bit, revisiting too many of the ideas of the first book without developing too much that was new He expounds a bit on the themes or nationalism and racism, and expands a bit his vision of the nature This is the second volume in Moorcock s Oswald Bastable trilogy, the Nomad of the Timestreams, an alternate history, post apocalyptic, steampunk before it was a thing series of adventures It follows The Warlord of the Air and precedes The Steel Tsar This one suffers from the middle book syndrome a bit, revisiting too many of the ideas of the first book without developing too much that was new He expounds a bit on the themes or nationalism and racism, and expands a bit his vision of the nature of his multiverse tapestry, but ultimately this one isn t one of his best works I do particularly like the Michael Whelan cover on my DAW edition And so the adventures of Oswald Bastable continue, thrusting him yet again through the barriers of time and into a strange Earth at once familiar and disturbing The themes and characters we explore are similar to the first volume, featuring at the center yet another Nemo esque warlord whose methods give our narrator uneasy pause By the end, we find ourselves liable to agree with Mr Bastable s suspicion that time is having a laugh at his expense, forcing him to experience history as variation And so the adventures of Oswald Bastable continue, thrusting him yet again through the barriers of time and into a strange Earth at once familiar and disturbing The themes and characters we explore are similar to the first volume, featuring at the center yet another Nemo esque warlord whose methods give our narrator uneasy pause By the end, we find ourselves liable to agree with Mr Bastable s suspicion that time is having a laugh at his expense, forcing him to experience history as variations on a theme , and not a theme he appreciates reliving.Usually, describing a book like this as alternate history is a malapropism, since alternate means to shift back and forth between things while alternative means of a different sort So, if we described wind power as an alternate energy to coal, that would mean we would be constantly switching between wind and coal, not replacing one with the other But in Moorcock s case, both terms are actually applicable, which must be a boon to sci fi fans that have trouble keeping words straight.So, if our theme is world shaking war , the variation here is global politics of racism There is a certain tension throughout the book because Moorcock presents a lot of genuinely racist characters of different stripes and degrees, and even lets prejudice slip into his narrator s mouth It s clear that the violence and rhetoric of the Civil Rights Era tickled Moorcock s unyielding imagination, so we get quite a few powerful and somewhat unsettling scenes charged with the complexities race dynamics.Moorcock also seemed to take a bittime with his narrative as compared to the last book, and didn t rely quite as much on bare exposition to carry the story along, which was nice but as usual with Moorcock, it was a fairly straightforward adventure with some interesting concepts driving it along throughout, but lacking polish and care Reminds me of this charming episode of Neal Degrasse Tyson s StarTalk where sex researcher Mary Roach talks about the fact that long term couples experience better sex because they tend to take their time and get lost in the moment, whereas newer couples are often going through the motions of what they think should work It s the same with writing books, people don t just go through the motions when you should be in the moment, taking the time to give your narrative the attention it deserves