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|Read Book º Kafka am Strand ¸ Wer bin ich Und wenn ja, wie viele Haruki Murakami formuliert es etwas anders, ist aber in Kafka am Strand wieder den gro en Fragen nach Identit t, Wahrnehmung und Wirklichkeit auf der Spur Er kn pft dabei erkl rterma en an seinen ersten Erfolg, Hard boiled Wonderland, an, inhaltlich wie formal Zwei Geschichten werden parallel erz hlt, ohne dass zun chst klar w rde, was die handelnden Personen miteinander verbindet Da ist zum einen Kafka, der an seinemGeburtstag ausrei t und vor einer d steren Prophezeiung seines Vaters auf die Insel Shikoku fl chtet Er schlie t Freundschaft mit dem Bibliothekar Oshima f r manche berraschung gut und verliebt sich in die wesentlich ltere Saeki Im Mittelpunkt des anderen Erz hlstrangs steht Nakata, der Katzenfl sterer, dessen Geistesschw che auf einen mysteri sen Vorfall im Jahrezur ck geht Jetzt glaubt er in einen Mordfall verwickelt zu sein und verl sst Tokio Unterwegs gerade hat es Blutegel geregnet trifft er den Fernfahrer Hoshino, auch ihr Weg f hrt schlie lich in Oshimas Bibliothek Diese dient als eine Art Scharnier zwischen den Welten, zwischen Leben und Tod, Vergangenheit und Gegenwart, Realit t und Fantasie Ihre B cher sind f r Kafka lebendiger und fesselnder als die Menschen, die vor dem Bahnhof herumwimmeln Er verliert sich allm hlich in diesem Zerrspiegel der Zeit , in erotischen Tagtr umen sind es Tr ume und Wahnvorstellungen Vielleicht habe ich meinen Vater durch meine Tr ume ermordet Liebt er diej hrige Saeki oder die alte Auch die Leser verlieren, n mlich irgendwann das Interesse an diesem hormongeplagten Halbstarken Wie m glicherweise der Autor, der auf der anderen Seite einen ergreifend tragikomischen Helden pr sentiert Nakata hat eigentlich keine Meinung Er mag Aal , definiert dieser japanische Schwejk sich selbst inmitten philosophischer Seifenblasen ein erfreulich n chternes Motto Die besten Szenen mit ihm und Hoshino k nnten von Beckett stammen zwei Landstreicher auf Sinnsuche Ist das ein guter Roman Und wenn ja, wie viele Mein Road Movie Roman Murakami , magischer Realismus, Seins Fiktion Nach einigen Durchh ngern endet die Probefahrt auf einer gigantischen Achterbahn rasant Murakami Fans, die erst ab Seiterichtig warm werden, werden sich freuen Murakami Sympathisanten halten sich an Nakata oder auch S tze wie diesen Erinnerungen sind das, was Ihren K rper von innen w rmt Patrick Fischer Surreal Poignant Magical Weird And a classic Murakami from beginning to end.This was my third book by Mr Murakami 1Q84, I enjoyed but I don t think I will be recommending it to anyone Then came Norwegian Woods which I loved and have recommended to many friends But Kafka on the Shore held a special place in the hearts of my friends who have read Murakami This seems to be their favourite So I went into this with high expectations, and Mr Murakami did not disappoint Story starts with th Surreal Poignant Magical Weird And a classic Murakami from beginning to end.This was my third book by Mr Murakami 1Q84, I enjoyed but I don t think I will be recommending it to anyone Then came Norwegian Woods which I loved and have recommended to many friends But Kafka on the Shore held a special place in the hearts of my friends who have read Murakami This seems to be their favourite So I went into this with high expectations, and Mr Murakami did not disappoint Story starts with the divulgence of a high profile investigation that happened in second WW Fast forward five decades and we are introduced to Kafka Tamura, a 15 year old, who runs away from his family to find the truth about himself Few chapters after we met our second main character Nakata, a simpleton who talks to cats After his retirement, Nakata survives by finding lost cats for people because of his special abilities Even though they are miles apart from each other, and yet their story so intricately woven that it is hard to comprehend where one starts and the other ends For me, this was the weirdest magical realm that I have ever read Fishes falling from the sky, talking to cats is there a word for being able to talk to cats , a man obsessed with the idea of creating a flute with the souls of cats, a man killing another man while the killer got away spotless, it was someone else woke up with a bloodied shirt miles away I am sure any other time I would have DNFed something this weird but Mr Murakami put a spell on me and I kept turning pages The desire to knowabout Kafka and Nakata and how their story entwines was too much Just like 1Q84 and Norwegian Woods, Murakami tells us a lot about music and books through his characters Whenever I read him I end up searching authors and musicians I love how he uses these two in his stories.So much happened in this book yet I will remember this book for its serenity and dreamlike story Though he didn t give us a conclusion here but I think this is the best way to end it I don t think a perfect ending is possible for this story There will always behows and buts , so it s better to let reader to create their own conclusion for this one.A challenging but also an amazing read Sometimes fate is like a small sandstorm that keeps changing directions You change direction but the sandstorm chases you You turn again, but the storm adjusts Over and over you play this out, like some ominous dance with death just before dawn Why Because this storm isn t something that blew in from far away, something that has nothing to do with you This storm is you Something inside of you So all you can do is give in to it, step right inside the storm, closing your eyes and plugging Sometimes fate is like a small sandstorm that keeps changing directions You change direction but the sandstorm chases you You turn again, but the storm adjusts Over and over you play this out, like some ominous dance with death just before dawn Why Because this storm isn t something that blew in from far away, something that has nothing to do with you This storm is you Something inside of you So all you can do is give in to it, step right inside the storm, closing your eyes and plugging up your ears so the sand doesn t get in, and walk through it, step by step There s no sun there, no moon, no direction, no sense of time Just fine white sand swirling up into the sky like pulverized bones That s the kind of sandstorm you need to imagine His given name isn t Kafka Tamura, but when he decides to strike out on his own he gave himself a name thatproperly fit the version of himself he wanted to become Kafka means crow in Czech A name of significance to an inner self His father is a world famous sculptor, a man admired for the strength of emotion his creations inspire He also brought his son into existence no hocus pocus herethe old fashioned way molding him as if he were inanimate clay, infusing him with imagination, and in the end like a demented soothsayer, warping him with an Oedipus curse.Kill the father.Sex the sister Seduce the motherIt s all a question of imagination Our responsibility begins with the power to imagine It s just like Yeats said In dreams begin responsibilities Flip this around and you could say that where there s no power to imagine, no responsibility can arise Kafka is fifteen, not going on sixteen, but barely fifteen He is on a quest to find himself.to lose himself.to escape himself.to avoid the prophecy Like an arrow shot by a sure hand he lands at a private library managed by a beautiful woman named Miss SaekiI look for the fifteen year old girl in her and find her right away She s hidden, asleep, like a 3 D painting in the forest of her heart But if you look carefully you can spot her My chest starts pounding again, like somebody s hammering a long nail into the walls surrounding itKafka feels a kinship with her that makes him wonder if she is his long lost mother She has experienced tragedy, losing a lover when she was fifteen, and leaving behind a ghost of herself that becomes a haunting experience for Kafka While they re still alive, people can become ghosts As a parallel story we follow the old man Nakata and his truck driving sidekick Hoshino Nakata experienced something as a child during the war that left him unable to comprehend reality, but also opened up doorways in his mind to things that if they ever existed in our minds have long been lost He is crazy.He is a prophet.He can talk to cats.He can understand stones.He can open an umbrella and leeches or fish or lightening can fall from the sky He isn t crazy Nakata searches for lost cats and discovers in the process that he has an arch nemesis in a cat killing phantom named Johnnie Walker Johnnie turns cats into beautiful flutes and collects their heads in a similar fashion to big game hunters After a confrontation Nakata finds himself with the need to leave which dovetails perfectly with his quest to find an entrance stone that opens up another world, another world where things have been left behind You should start searching for the other half of your shadow The connection between Nakata and Kafka are very strong Their dreams mingle, a nemesis for one is a nemesis for the other They may have different names, but they are one and the same The quest for one of our heroes is contingent on the success of the other If they are aware of each other it is buried under their own current perceptions of reality One of thehumorous moments is when Hoshino, once a perfectly sane normal human being, meets Colonel Sanders, not someone dressed as Colonel Sanders, but the finger lickin good, fried chicken magnet himself Hoshino, after several days of trying to wrap his head around the eccentricities of his traveling companion, is in need of relaxation As it turns out the Colonel can help him have the best time of his life He hooks him up with a prostitute, but not just any prostituteThe pure present is an ungraspable advance of the past devouring the future In truth, all sensation is already memory A philosophical prostitute with a special penchant for HegelHegel believed that a person is not merely conscious of self and object as separate entities, but through the projection of the self via the mediation of the object is volitionally able to gain a deeper understanding of the self All of which constitutes self consciousness I dont know what the heck you re talking about Well, think of what I m doing to you right now For me I m the self, and you re the object For you, of course, it s the exact opposite you re the self to you and I m the object And by exchanging self and object, we can project ourselves into the other and gain self consciousness Volitionally I still don t get it, but it sure feels good That s the whole idea the girl said.I have a new appreciation for Hegel.Kafka also meets a fantastic character named Oshima which I really can t talk about without explaining him in detail, but by explaining him in detail would reveal a rather surprising moment in the book which I really want to preserve for those that haven t read this book yet Let s just say he isn t exactly who he seems, but he is exactly who he says he is He proves to be the perfect friend for anyone, but for a dream questing fifteen year old runaway trying to escape an Oedipus Curse he is a steady rock to understand even those things beyond the scope of comprehension He sees things forthan what they are.Oshima explains to Kafka why he likes SchubertThat s why I like to listen to Schubert while I m driving Like I said, it s because all the performances are imperfect A dense, artistic kind of imperfection stimulates your consciousness, keeps you alert If I listen to some utterly perfect performance of an utterly perfect piece while I m driving I might want to close my eyes and die right then and there But listening to the D major, I can feel the limits of what humans are capable of that a certain type of perfection can only be realized through a limitless accumulation of the imperfect And personally, I find that encouraging It is hard for those of us who have based their whole life off of reason to keep from instantly dismissing the improbable, the impossible, the absurd, the preposterous, but you must if you are going to hang with Haruki Murakami Although, I must say there is something very accessible about his writing style that makes the transition from reality to alternative reality to fantasy back to a new reality painless We all have mystical things happen to us We rarely recognize it, most times we fill in what we don t understand with something we can understand and in the process snap the threads of the extraordinary I feel the lure of the unknown quite regularly I feel the itch to leave everything and go someplace where no one knows my name A place where maybe I can find the rest of my self, the lost selves each holding a fragment of the missing part of my shadow If you wish to seeof my most recent book and movie reviews, visithttp www.jeffreykeeten.comI also have a Facebook blogger page at Few books have infected me with boredom induced ADD, the desire to gnaw my own foot off at the ankle, and the state of mind you might experience if forced to sit upon a nest of hornets while watching your home being burglarized, but this was one of them It took me until page 70 to stop wanting to hop up and rearrange the spice cupboard or my sock drawer every few sentences, but then the feeling returned at page 243 Only 224 pages to go From then on, my hatred and resentment of this book progr Few books have infected me with boredom induced ADD, the desire to gnaw my own foot off at the ankle, and the state of mind you might experience if forced to sit upon a nest of hornets while watching your home being burglarized, but this was one of them It took me until page 70 to stop wanting to hop up and rearrange the spice cupboard or my sock drawer every few sentences, but then the feeling returned at page 243 Only 224 pages to go From then on, my hatred and resentment of this book progressively grew like a dead cow bloating in the heat Kafka on the Shore is a mess It is such a mess that it makes my six year old son s post playdate bedroom look like Buckingham Palace Loosely based on the Oedipus myth, and taking some obvious inspiration from Catcher in the Rye, this book seems to be littlethan a random hodgepodge of ideas held together with pipe cleaners and raspberry jam There was so much to hate about this book Here are just a few things 1 Boring, unnecessary descriptions that do nothing to further the story of what people are wearing, what Kafka likes to do during his workout, what he decides to eat, what he is listening to on his Walkman, and so on I wouldn t have been surprised to read a monologue from Kafka along the lines of When I wipe my arse, I like to use just four squares of toilet paper, no , no less I count them out one, two, three, four Then I fold the length over once, and again Equipped now with the perfect, handheld quilt, I wipe in a single, expert, sweeping motion front to back Examine the paper to determine whether I need to repeat the process However, I would add that this is only if the paper is two ply For one ply paper, I need a minimum of eight sheets, but only if they are of high quality If not of high quality, the boy Crow reminds me, Remember, you ve got to be the toughest 15 year old on the planet 2 The gratuitous cat torture scene Johnnie Walker him off the whiskey bottle has to cut the hearts out of living cats and eat them so that he can collect cat souls to make a special kind of flute There is no freakin point to this scene whatsoever we never hear about Johnnie or his cat flute again.3 The annoying way characters Oshima in particular deliver sermons about philosophy, art, literature and classical music It took me right out of the story tangled mess though it was and smacked of Look at me aren t I clever 4 The screechy preachy scene with the feminist caricatures in the library.5 Hate to be ungroovy or whatever but I just couldn t stand any of the sex scenes, particularly with Miss Saeki, the 50 something librarian who gets it on over and over again with the 15 year old protagonist even though he and she both know she might be his long lost mother Excuse me while I go mop the vomitus off of my living room wall.After the first 100 pages I thought that I might end up giving this book three stars Another 100 pages on, I decided two stars By page 331 I decided one star, and by the end of this frustrating, pretentious, and completely unsatisfying book, I felt like I d squandered so much of my precious life reading this pile o doo doo that I didn t want to give it even one star However, since Mr Murakami knows how to spell or at least, I m assuming he does since this is a translation I will relent In the end, love or loathing of a book is entirely subjective, and scores of critics loved this one As for me, I feel that if I d wanted to find meaning in a random jumble of junk, I would have hadluck going to the thrift store and sifting through the bric a brac box than wasting time on Mr Murakami s brain omelette second read thoughts I thought I d get a better understanding for this story the second time around, but I m still lost in a world full of questions I know that s partly the author s intent though I feel like I m going to drive myself crazy if I keep trying to make sense of what this book is trying to achieve I think that s kind of the point though This book isn t trying to achieve anything, it s one of those books where the reader is left to decide what the book ultimately does Which make second read thoughts I thought I d get a better understanding for this story the second time around, but I m still lost in a world full of questions I know that s partly the author s intent though I feel like I m going to drive myself crazy if I keep trying to make sense of what this book is trying to achieve I think that s kind of the point though This book isn t trying to achieve anything, it s one of those books where the reader is left to decide what the book ultimately does Which makes this an eveninteresting experience, because everyone comes out of it with something different first read thoughts This was definitely an interesting read I feel like I will have to read it again for everything to fully make sense, but I was surprised by how easy this book was to follow I also loved the writing style I will definitely be givingbooks by Haruki Murakami ago in the future