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`Read Book ⚡ Masurarea lumii · Editia originala a bestsellerului Masurarea lumii a atins tirajul dede exemplare, mentinandu se timp dede saptamani pe primul loc in topul vanzarilor din Germania, iar cartea a fost tradusa inde tariSpre sfarsitul secolului al XVIII lea, doi tineri germani si au pus in gand sa masoare lumea Unul dintre ei, Alexander von Humboldt, infrunta pericolele strabate jungla si stepele, navigheaza pe fluviul Orinoco, gusta otrava, numara paduchi, se taraste prin grote, escaladeaza vulcani, are de a face cu monstri marini si canibali Celalalt, matematicianul si astronomul Carl Friedrich Gauss care, desi nu concepe viata fara femei, sare din pat in noaptea nuntii ca sa si noteze o formula , o tine una si buna, fara sa se clinteasca din Gotingenul de bastina, cum ca spatiul ar fi curb Batrani, celebri si un pic nastrusnici, cei doi se intalnesc inla Berlin Dar nici nu coboara bine Gauss din trasura sa, si amandoi se ratacesc in labirintul politicii germane de dupa caderea lui Napoleon Un roman filozofic de aventuri, ale carui forta si stralucire sunt de a dreptul nemaiintalnite I just wanted to take a short break from two extremely serious and depressing books I m reading at the moment and thought that plunging into the worlds of two geniuses would be perfect Re reading this novel is as fascinating as it was while reading it for the first time. Die Vermessung der Welt Measuring the World, Daniel KehlmannMeasuring the World is a novel by German author Daniel Kehlmann, 2005 published by Rowohlt Verlag, Reinbek The novel re imagines the lives of German mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss and German geographer Alexander von Humboldt who was accompanied on his journeys by Aime Bonpland and their many groundbreaking ways of taking the world s measure, as well as Humboldt s and Bonpland s travels in America and their meeting in 1828 One Die Vermessung der Welt Measuring the World, Daniel KehlmannMeasuring the World is a novel by German author Daniel Kehlmann, 2005 published by Rowohlt Verlag, Reinbek The novel re imagines the lives of German mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss and German geographer Alexander von Humboldt who was accompanied on his journeys by Aime Bonpland and their many groundbreaking ways of taking the world s measure, as well as Humboldt s and Bonpland s travels in America and their meeting in 1828 One subplot fictionalizes the conflict between Gauss and his son Eugene while Eugene wanted to become a linguist, his father decreed that he study law 2012 1390 367 9789643697587 1394 21 20051828 The Gene ius Pool In the early 19th century Germany ruled the intellectual world Oraccurately, given that Germany didn t yet exist, German was the globally dominant language of science, philosophy, and most other cultural pursuitsMeasuring the Worldis a light hearted docudrama of the intersecting life of two of the most important intellectual leaders of the period The explorer and naturalist and Prussian Alexander von Humboldt, and the mathematical prodigy Carl Friedrich Gauss The Gene ius Pool In the early 19th century Germany ruled the intellectual world Oraccurately, given that Germany didn t yet exist, German was the globally dominant language of science, philosophy, and most other cultural pursuitsMeasuring the Worldis a light hearted docudrama of the intersecting life of two of the most important intellectual leaders of the period The explorer and naturalist and Prussian Alexander von Humboldt, and the mathematical prodigy Carl Friedrich Gauss an Hanoverian Together they transformed human understanding of both things and symbols, as well as the connection between things and symbols That is to say, they created a new language.The backgrounds of these two men show that genius is purely genetic Humboldt was a member of a well fed, well educated, and well connected elite Gauss s mother, on the other hand, was illiterate and his father was a labourer Humboldt survived a young brother who tried to kill him, and being raised by the servants Gauss survived the persecution of jealous teachers and a social awkwardness verging on the autistic Both thrived because they were recognised and rewarded by monarchical rulers as contributing to German culture One wonders what their fates might have been in the competitive academic milieu of a modern pragmatic democracy.Above all two traits principles character flaws unite these two men First, for them everything is connected to everything else Distinctions between areas of knowledge are not simply arbitrary, they are irrelevant Both defy classification into a definite academic niche They are quite simply interested in everything that is, a sort of openness which is astounding in its apparent lack of limits If they had taken up painting, they would be considered today greater than Michelangelo thus the power of visual advertising Second, both shared a passion for numbers Numbers are what brought reality closer They reduced the gap between what Kant yes, another German had called the thing in itself and our perception of it Measurement was philosophy in action Increasing precision in measurement meant progress, an improvement in understanding that was demonstrable Numbers, as the ancient Greeks suggested, provided a sort of divine view of the world Numbers were fixed in their relations to each other, unlike natural language which was fuzzy and required less than perfect translation out of the mother tongue into barbaric dialects like English and French.What the two men did was to create a new cultural era Measurement was a metaphor for hope Kant s aporias didn t imply an intellectual dead end And hadn t he put religion aside into a parallel world that seemed increasingly unnecessary Numbers could improve the world not just describe it Numbers formed the new foundation for human salvation They were almost magical in their power to reveal and explain how the world came to be, to simplify its apparent complexity, and to predict its further development Numbers were the future Numbers touched realityAt the base of physics were rules, at the base of rules there were laws, at the base of laws there were numbers if one looked at them intently, one could recognize relationships between them, repulsions or attractionsThe patterns revealed by numbers allowed the telling of stories which had never been told before Stories of intense heat in the Earth, of antiquities older than ever before dreamed of, stories of parallel lines that meet, of bizarre celestial phenomena The language of numbers wasn t justreliable than any other language, it was bigger It permitted discussion of things no other languages knew about It pointed to things that were hidden in normal speech It resolved paradoxes and suggested previously unthought possibilities The world got used to being measured The web of numbers imposed itself upon the world so thoroughly that it was taken as the world This is what all languages do, and perhaps the language of numbers best of all Human beings engage in this fantasy of language as reality in order to maintain hope or,generally, to stay sane Faith in measurement is evenintense than faith in God As it turns out the object of the two faiths is exactly the same language Language is our fundamental technology and we worship it Today, we have a new language digital electronics in which we have as deep a faith as Humboldt and Gauss had in theirs Genius, it seems, even exceptional German genius is not immune to the temptation of idolatry I want to explore the world That is a quite common answer if you ask a group of motivated preteen students what they want to do when they grow up Hungry little caterpillars, they eat their way through a mixed diet of knowledge and skills over the course of their education before entering the strange teenage cocoon stage when they can t be bothered with anything but their own physical and social development.As a teacher, you look at all these potential explorers, and their diverse approaches I want to explore the world That is a quite common answer if you ask a group of motivated preteen students what they want to do when they grow up Hungry little caterpillars, they eat their way through a mixed diet of knowledge and skills over the course of their education before entering the strange teenage cocoon stage when they can t be bothered with anything but their own physical and social development.As a teacher, you look at all these potential explorers, and their diverse approaches to life, and to learning and interpretation of reality, and you think I have no doubt that they will explore the world, but what EXACTLY that will mean, nobody can tell until they are fully developed butterflies, with their own individual patterns and flight routes That is the core of the story Kehlmann tells, by using the examples of two famous adventurers of the Enlightenment You can sit in your room and explore the abstract world of mathematics in your own isolated brain, like Gauss, or you can climb mountains, swim through rivers, march through swamps, and collect physical evidence of your journey, like Alexander von Humboldt Either way, you will be exploring the world, according to your needs, your history, your education and your personality.Genius has many shapes, and expresses itself in various ways, is the optimistic message a life saving one for teachers who work with the post caterpillar, pre butterfly cocoon stage Geniuses are humans with specific talents and difficulties, and their own issues, is the realistic conclusion, and all it takes to cross the line between ordinary talent and genius may be a stubborn curious desire to move on towards an ever changing horizon.Geniuses achieve great things with ordinary bodies and minds, and extraordinary belief in the possibilities of the world.Geniuses can be grumpy and worried and arrogant and absent minded and just plain funny, they come in all colours and shapes What do they have in common They use their wings