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Early modern Hebrew writers like Bialik, Agnon and Amichai, tended to focus on the collective experience The emergence of writers like A.B Yehoshua changed this emphasis to the individual an individual at odds with society and with themself.Friendly Fire is ostensibly about people It uses an alternative discourse, the modern Israeli, far from the battlefield or the Kibbutz as the protagonist By doing so, it relieves us from the harsh political realities of the modern state The result is a Early modern Hebrew writers like Bialik, Agnon and Amichai, tended to focus on the collective experience The emergence of writers like A.B Yehoshua changed this emphasis to the individual an individual at odds with society and with themself.Friendly Fire is ostensibly about people It uses an alternative discourse, the modern Israeli, far from the battlefield or the Kibbutz as the protagonist By doing so, it relieves us from the harsh political realities of the modern state The result is a thought provoking journey of identity and crisis.The plot involves a duet like narrative a spiritual Africa versus a material Israel Amotz and Daniela Ya ari are a middle aged married couple Daniella, a flighty intellectual type travels to Africa to visit her brother in law to seek closure on her sister s death What she finds is a man left wounded and raging after an earlier tragedy a death by friendly fire The second plot involves Amotz, the quintessential family man and a somewhat dull elevator engineer who spends the majority of the novel either attending to the mundane a sultry daughter in law, a son absconded from the army and two vigorous grand children, or resolving a wind spirit problem in an elevator shaft The duality of the narrative comes off as wholly ironic a spiritual and deserted Africa is contrasted with an ordinary city Whereas physical drama takes place in the empty space of Tanzania, a somewhat tepid but emotional journey arises in the concrete metropolis of secular Israel By inverting the modern post Zionist narrative, Yehoshua recognizes that human mood, culture and self are just as important as the political discourse Homeland and exile are grounds for dissent and spiritual failings images of western decadence are contrasted with African exile expressions of materialism are juxtaposed with a physically empty yet spirited Africa Attempts to identify as one people and one land are blown wide open Yehoshua wants us question what it is we want from a modern Israel.The writing is superb Yehoshua s meticulous detail to diction and cadence as well as his considerable mastery of language is comparable to that of Faulkner Unfortunately the title, perhaps the most important element of the novel is lost in translation The Hebrew, Eish Yedidot conjures acomplex meaning than the English idiom, which does not connote the same vast and knotty feelings that it does in Hebrew Similarly the term for wind is the same as for spirit ruach which metaphor is central to the plot and which is lost in the English The novel is warm, intelligent and full of human feeling It is also beautifully written with a sophistication seen only in an authentic writer It is a masterful work, clearly detailing what it means to be Israeli today I also found this book when looking for another by the author the synopsis is not engaging enough to make it first choice It is a slow paced story and most of it is about everyday concerns of family, work, ageing and coping with grief The author has done an excellent job of making those everyday concerns into a compelling narrative.There are two story lines following an elderly couple the wife on a trip to visit her widowed brother in law in Tanzania and the husband at home in Tel Aviv with I also found this book when looking for another by the author the synopsis is not engaging enough to make it first choice It is a slow paced story and most of it is about everyday concerns of family, work, ageing and coping with grief The author has done an excellent job of making those everyday concerns into a compelling narrative.There are two story lines following an elderly couple the wife on a trip to visit her widowed brother in law in Tanzania and the husband at home in Tel Aviv with a problematic noisy lift shaft The couple have rarely been separated for this length of time and switching backwards and forwards between the two shows how close they are, even when apart.There are a lot of cultural, historical, nationalistic and religious undertones to the book, some treated subtly and others in quite a heavy handed way The strands of family loyalty and anthropology are obviously the micro and macro manifestation of caring about humanity, both areimportant than an individual nation Yumi the brother in law has taken his detachment from nation too far and also detached himself from family and, it seems, all living humans The mutant elephant perhaps subtly represents a different way of seeing, which is rare but also valuable people pay to see the elephant The lift problem shows several people who say they want to solve it, but who spend far too much of their time apportioning blame The lift shaft is in Tel Aviv, a place where Israeli Palestinian tension has often been high, too obvious The book is called Friendly Fire , which is a dreadful or dread filled phrase, and an incidence of friendly fire drives the characters and the narrative When we learn the circumstances which caused this incident, they are both sad and banal, which somehow makes itdreadful Do everything possible to leave this world without complaints or bitterness So says Amotz Ya ari in this kind and gentle book.It is Hannukkah, and Amotz s wife, Daniela, a high school English teacher in Tel Aviv, is off to Tanzania to visit her brother in law Daniela s sister has died recently and the brother in law, a retired Israeli diplomat, has decided not to return to Israel, but stay behind in East Africa Amotz does not accompany Daniela, remaining in Tel Aviv to deal with family and Do everything possible to leave this world without complaints or bitterness So says Amotz Ya ari in this kind and gentle book.It is Hannukkah, and Amotz s wife, Daniela, a high school English teacher in Tel Aviv, is off to Tanzania to visit her brother in law Daniela s sister has died recently and the brother in law, a retired Israeli diplomat, has decided not to return to Israel, but stay behind in East Africa Amotz does not accompany Daniela, remaining in Tel Aviv to deal with family and work problems So we have two intertwined tales that alternate through the novel While not a great book, it is very, very good It will teach you a lot about Israel and the pain that lies just beneath the surface of everyone, Jew or Arab And, possibly, leave you with the slightest glimmer of hope Highly recommended Way too indulgent literature of decadence Very weak Yehshoua has apparently taken his status as grand old man of hebrew letters and ran with it as the entire novel feels phoned in The narrative is lackluster and boring, the characters one dimensional and unsympathetic and all slight variations of the same voice and Yehoshua paints with such broad strokes regarding Israel and ALL of Africa that at times the story becomes nearly impossible to take seriously The author s views apart from th Way too indulgent literature of decadence Very weak Yehshoua has apparently taken his status as grand old man of hebrew letters and ran with it as the entire novel feels phoned in The narrative is lackluster and boring, the characters one dimensional and unsympathetic and all slight variations of the same voice and Yehoshua paints with such broad strokes regarding Israel and ALL of Africa that at times the story becomes nearly impossible to take seriously The author s views apart from this disgust me, and I read this along with two of his other works while trying to remain objective The Lover was good, Open Heart was fair and this is just sentimentalist trash Sex, death, love, infidelity, parents, children, Jews, Arabs, family, loss, howling winds and an elephant with a mysterious blue eye Loved it. I went looking for a different Yehoshua book in the library, which they don t own, and checked out this title instead I claim that it s my healthy alternative to impulse buying in a shopping mall Even though I have twenty some titles on my To Read list, all thoroughly vetted by Friends recommendations, I m still driven to taking risks and choosing a book by it s cover Call me Crazy The story is a tale of an Israeli couple, Amotz and Daniela, who are separated for eight days while the wife vi I went looking for a different Yehoshua book in the library, which they don t own, and checked out this title instead I claim that it s my healthy alternative to impulse buying in a shopping mall Even though I have twenty some titles on my To Read list, all thoroughly vetted by Friends recommendations, I m still driven to taking risks and choosing a book by it s cover Call me Crazy The story is a tale of an Israeli couple, Amotz and Daniela, who are separated for eight days while the wife visits her brother in law in Africa B i l is an Israeli ex pat and Daniela goes to see him to find closure in her sister s recent death Yehoshua builds the story around the eight day festival of Chanukah Amotz celebrates the various nights candle lighting in Israel with his adult children, grandchildren and business associates Daniela spends the time with B i l who in his grief has shunned all things Israel and all things Jewish Both Amotz and Daniela spend their time doing lots of things they didn t plan on doing The story is a well written character driven novel Yehoshua alternates his sub chapters between Africa and Israel in an almost too rigid fashion, jumping back and forth in short three to five page chunks Not a typical novel with a strong plot and resolved conflict, but an easy read nonetheless Yehoshua writes about ordinary, likable people leading ordinary lives sometimes disrupted by events Sort of an Israeli Anne Tyler, and Israel itself is important to the book I enjoyed this book very much. *DOWNLOAD E-PUB ⇖ Friendly Fire ☠ A long married couple are spending an unaccustomed week apart Daniela visits her recently widowed brother in law in Africa Amotz Ya ari stays in Israel dealing with his lift engineering consultancy, and his large demanding family The interwoven chapters create a duet like narrative which penetrates deeply into human relationships A really slow read Many contemporary Israeli authors delve into the stoic at times obstinate psyche of what it means to be an Israeli and that narrative carries on for chapters It s emotionally exhausting I ll continue to slog through, waiting for a breakthrough. I loved the writing and the endearing family members It had a similar feel to The Liberated Bride.