(FREE DOWNLOAD) Ý The Names of Birds Ì eBook or E-pub free

Having come back from the West Coast and having spotted some new birds for my life list, I saw this book in the library and decided to give it a quick read I enjoyed his colorful descriptions of the birds and their antics, many of them being familiar I especially enjoyed the one entitled Birders in which he describes their uncommon excitement at seeing any bird, rare or ordinary In another entitled Bobcat Bite, he exhorts Be brave birders As in most matters of the heart, you travel incog Having come back from the West Coast and having spotted some new birds for my life list, I saw this book in the library and decided to give it a quick read I enjoyed his colorful descriptions of the birds and their antics, many of them being familiar I especially enjoyed the one entitled Birders in which he describes their uncommon excitement at seeing any bird, rare or ordinary In another entitled Bobcat Bite, he exhorts Be brave birders As in most matters of the heart, you travel incognito and eat alone The one On the Back Side of a Cemetery in Santa Fe, NM describes a cactus wren on a teddybear cactus and reminded me of a trip to Joshua Tree National Park and those crazy teddybear cacti that jump on you as you walk by In Roosevelt s Diary he describes an experience Teddy Roosevelt had while hunting elk out in Wyoming I could not aim the damn gun, silly as that might sound, let alone pull the trigger while this little bird was perched on the horn of my saddle His soul, so tiny, i believed, was visiting mine The author criticizes technological progress and organized religion, encouraging us instead to take joy in the simple quiet things of life like birds Imagine if T.S Eliot s Prufrock character had been both a poet and a bird watcher that is what this Tom Crawford book felt like to me. (FREE DOWNLOAD) ï The Names of Birds ⚸ A nuthatch walking perpendicular down a tree, dressed to kill, the hydraulic lift of the sand hill cranes legs at take off, the song of the vireo Perhaps birders are a special species but they also include many of us, who if not trained to binoculars, are still stopped in our tracks at a flickering wing in our peripheral vision In this latest collection of poems, Tom Crawford lends his keen sense of observation and resonant language to the wonder and evocative nature of birds in all their multiplicity Here are a hundred pages of remarkable poetry, poems, which, in their accessibility and lyrical celebration, establish man s essential connection with birds and the natural world As he says in his prologue, We are spiritual animals When we forget this essential truth, we invite calamity These poems are offered like prayers as if by naming the thing like Shackleton planting a flag at the north pole the poet stakes a claim for birds, and by extension the planet His poems sing an ancient truth to lose our sense of wonder is to lose ourselves What makes THE NAMES OF BIRDS unique is the balance the poet strikes between fear and hope, mystery and wonder This he achieves by telling us a story in poetry of his own beginnings as a boy discovering birds and their magical place in his young life, a story readers of all ages can relate to Through his evolution to maturity his journey from Michigan, to southern California, the Pacific northwest, Manhattan, New Mexico and Asia China, Korea his writing becomes infused with Eastern thought and a sense of mysticism A book for birders and serious readers of poetry alike