^DOWNLOAD ↸ Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain ⇞ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

The neurologist Oliver Sacks has a great book called Musicophilia and a series of talks available on YouTube which goes into some really interesting descriptions of the brain s relationship to music One story involves a man getting hit by lightning and afterward having a newly acquired and deeply profound love of music almost any music, too , profound to the point that he would feel a euphoria akin to religio mystical rapture or an extremely pleasurable drug experience in all situations if m The neurologist Oliver Sacks has a great book called Musicophilia and a series of talks available on YouTube which goes into some really interesting descriptions of the brain s relationship to music One story involves a man getting hit by lightning and afterward having a newly acquired and deeply profound love of music almost any music, too , profound to the point that he would feel a euphoria akin to religio mystical rapture or an extremely pleasurable drug experience in all situations if music began to play And then the depressing opposite of this, a woman who hated all music because it all literally sounded like pots and pans clanking around Her brain simply couldn t sort out the frequencies properly.Full Lecture by Oliver Sacks on Musicophilia clips on the same subject Amusia total inability to hear music as music Music Therapy and Parkinson sThe Power of RhythmStrokes, Language, and Music overcoming aphasia through musicBright Blue Music synesthesia and musicEarworms the neurology of catchy tunesAmnesia and MusicBolt From The Blue the one I mentioned about the guy being struck by lightning and so forth Music responseMusic that triggers some kind of responseI have what you want, I have what you needSo sang the Chemical Brothers with what was the entire vocal and lyric content of their song Music Response With those three lines sang over and over again to a heavy dance laden beat they make a good soundtrack for the content of this good read on music and the brain Author Oliver Sacks, I suspect, would not have known who The Chemical Brothers were but I think he would have understood the meanin Music responseMusic that triggers some kind of responseI have what you want, I have what you needSo sang the Chemical Brothers with what was the entire vocal and lyric content of their song Music Response With those three lines sang over and over again to a heavy dance laden beat they make a good soundtrack for the content of this good read on music and the brain Author Oliver Sacks, I suspect, would not have known who The Chemical Brothers were but I think he would have understood the meaning considering the depth of subject Music has played a huge part of my life Not as a player, very poor 3 chord thrash as a youth was about it, but as a huge consumer My parents had a diverse mix of classical and jazz for me to devour as a young boy My mum s sister was a Beatles fan and my dad s brother was a musician of some ability who played Sax and Clarinet and even made it onto TV talent shows My first recording purchased with my own pocket money was a 7 single, Coz I Luv You by Slade I must have been 11 or 12 It has been a long journey to now paying via download my latest purchase Sarah Mary Chadwick such is the way we now procure music As I say to anyone that asks, over the years my tastes have been truly eclectic, I listen to all genres and all artists, Abba to Zorn one might say When I purchased this book back on 24 2 2009 the receipt was found tucked into the back page on finishing I was ready to devour it The trouble was I read Sacksfamous The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat first, a book I also had at that time I did not enjoy Hat at all It was dense in terminology, lacking in focus and with uninspiring writing did little to hold my attention Hence this read was placed way back of the reading pack So now started and finished I have to say that I have enjoyed this a little bitthan I expected to The writing can still be a little uninspiring though the focus is obvious, a focus that is no bad thing for the likes of me Sacks covers a lot of territory Why we may like, dislike or even be indifferent to music Amnesia and Dementia and why those that suffer may have an affinity with music Why at some gigs concerts some musicians spend an inordinate amount of time tuning their instruments between just about every song There are many interesting anecdotes Clive Wearing suffered herpes encephalitis of the brain causing amnesia Clive has been the subject of a documentary called The Man With the Seven Second Memory I recommend looking at a youtube of Clive who has as little as 30 seconds memory at best, can hardly recall the subject of a sentence in discussion but then can still play the piano at a remarkable ability Sacks thought that Clive had semantic memory as apposed in the absence of explicit and episodic memory but was not that sure William s Syndrome was another I had to admit that I had never heard of this affliction but Sacks discussion and explanation was first rate In the end though, this will be my 2nd and last book by Sacks As much as I have enjoyed this one I know it was the subject matter that was attractive When getting into his own field of Neurology in explanation of his thoughts on the subject of music and the brain his writing was a little too dense for me I understand that the subject matter needs certain scientific explanation but as a lay reader I did need to reread sentences a couple of times and internet search medical terms The bibliography would be useful to the specialist in the field but not so much the layman such as I Footnoted galore but then some of them are half a page long and as interesting as they can be at times it seemedlike he had footnoted an event he was keen to include in the narrative but knew not how I do recommend this very interesting book though If one is curious as to why music and the brain can work together in mysterious ways this will bethan useful My Personal Musical Extras.As I wrote this review I was on forced leave due to the company I work for having its income collapse due to Corvid 19 Time will tell if I return I hope I do as I enjoy my work I have my own small office and have a 30 year old battered boom box in the corner to play CD s on as background Yes I could go digital but the monstrosity still works and I have so many CD s from the old day I packed up about 100 as I left work and then reflected on them, a mix of Classical from Beethoven and Mussorgsky to modern composers such as Glass and Nyman Jazz was covered too with The Atlantic Years by John Coltrane through to a crazy set of compilation CD s that I got in the 90 s for jazz in all its subvarieties When I was in the mood for a certain genre I was covered The very good Underworld got a serious play in the last week as they seemed perfect for the times, repetitious experimental beats that hit the mark while our office staff discussed our futures I work for a printing company and we have a few old Heidelberg cylinders Whenever I had to go to the production factory they were clunking away in a never ending rhythm that had my brain singing along to whatever suited its 4 4 time I need it I don t want it I need it I don t want it I need it I don t want it I need it I don t want it I need it I don t want it I need it I don t want it was the sound it sang to me on my last visit, a cadence for Mortiis black metal ambient tune called This Absolution It seemed just right considering the circumstances Each evening after work I had always gone for a 30 minute walk Headphones on, the music of choice had always had an atmospheric bent, Dead Can Dance, This Mortal Coil are just a couple of examples Now with lockdown there are few reasons to leave the house though excuse is engaging alone for physical exercise I now get out in the morning and walk for a couple of hours in a local forest I have found that I do not want to listen to music That is a strange feeling I have realised that I needed the sound of the forest, the birds singing and the crunch of the path under my feet No music seems to suit the present circumstances This may be the first time in my life that I have felt like this Sacks relives the pathologies of musical response in his patients while working at Beth Abraham Hospital He describes music as a panacea and says, they were liberated by music This applies to patients with dementia and those suffering from Williams Syndrome Despite low IQ, he honors them in kind descriptive terms having wide mouths, upturned noses and a true adoration of music We humans are a musical species no less than a linguistic onewe perceive tones, timbre, pitch intervals, melo Sacks relives the pathologies of musical response in his patients while working at Beth Abraham Hospital He describes music as a panacea and says, they were liberated by music This applies to patients with dementia and those suffering from Williams Syndrome Despite low IQ, he honors them in kind descriptive terms having wide mouths, upturned noses and a true adoration of music We humans are a musical species no less than a linguistic onewe perceive tones, timbre, pitch intervals, melodic contours, harmony perhaps most elementally rhythm We integrate all of these and construct music in our minds Oliver Sacks, MD Sacks deeply warm and sympathetic study is about pathologies of musical response and erudition gained from a normal faculty of music In addition, within are new findings from anatomy We also learn how is the musicians mind different than others There is the curious case of Harry S having a perfect tenor voice yet he showed no emotion, except when he sang as if music brought him to life Exceptional study and storytelling by Dr Oliver Sacks The connections that music impart and patient studies L Dopa are in Awakenings I found interesting the case study of a 42 year old man struck by lightning, then he developed an exigent thirst for music learned to play piano and compose Truly an effervescent account of life Found personal drug use confessions by Sacks surprising Read and explore your reaction to music This book was interesting, I guess Lots of anecdotes about the effect of music on behavior and personality, but not enough analysis Sacks usually isof a story teller than a hardcore neuroscientist in his popular book at least in the other two that I ve read by him but in this book he fails to be a good story teller too Too many tidbits and little stories I definitely recommend This Is Your Brain on Music over this book if you re interested in a real scientific analysis of music and This book was interesting, I guess Lots of anecdotes about the effect of music on behavior and personality, but not enough analysis Sacks usually isof a story teller than a hardcore neuroscientist in his popular book at least in the other two that I ve read by him but in this book he fails to be a good story teller too Too many tidbits and little stories I definitely recommend This Is Your Brain on Music over this book if you re interested in a real scientific analysis of music and our obsession with it.Every time that I read a book by Sacks or something similar I get a depressing feeling of being a slave to my brain It just reinforces the idea that we are our brains You don t need to have any of the weird and often fascinating problems that Sacks patients have Even in us ordinary people, our personality and behavior are governed by our brain chemistry and neural connectivity Anatomy is destiny, as Freud said, if anatomy is to mean brain The positive side is that this way of looking at people can lead to a better understanding and acceptance of others Next time that you encounter someone with an unpleasant personality trait, or an annoying behavior, or a different outlook to life than yours, just remember that he has a different brain organization from yours He s just different from you This helps to accept people and become less judgmental I was flying forwards Bewildered I looked around I saw my own body on the ground I said to myself, Oh shit, I m dead I saw people converging on the body I saw a woman she had been standing waiting to use the phone right behind me position herself over my body, give it CPR I floated up the stairs my consciousness came with me I saw my kids, had the realization that they would be okay Then I was surrounded by a bluish white light an enormous feeling of well being and peaceI was flying forwards Bewildered I looked around I saw my own body on the ground I said to myself, Oh shit, I m dead I saw people converging on the body I saw a woman she had been standing waiting to use the phone right behind me position herself over my body, give it CPR I floated up the stairs my consciousness came with me I saw my kids, had the realization that they would be okay Then I was surrounded by a bluish white light an enormous feeling of well being and peace The highest and lowest points of my life raced by me No emotion associated with these pure thought, pure ecstacy I had the perception of accelerating, being drawn up there was speed and direction Then as I was saying to myself, This is the most glorious feeling I have ever had SLAM I was backI will never cease to be amazed by books This above account was given by Tony Cicoria, forty two, very fit and robust, and a well regarded orthopedic surgeon in a small city in upstate New York He survived an experience of being struck by lighning He continued his work but from this time on he had the most incredible need to connect with music He was subsequently divorced and continued with his incredible sudden love for music and composition.I am not religious and I am not a believer, as such, but I know there is another life after death I cannot describe it It is certainly not faith but a certainty from what I have experienced during the last two years that tells me, yes, life continues after death Many will believe that I am an absolute idiot but I really don t care We come from nothing but there is no proof about this indeed with birth, but we do indeed go to an illustrious future.Oliver Sacks has made the most incredible research of people with neurological conditions and all of these case studies are riveting You can literally pick up this book and look at whatever page and find something amazing It is really a remarkable reference book and I was just so enthralled to see individuals with evidently insurmountable problems and yet who managed to overcome these through music.Music is a wonderful thing and it indeed takes up a large part in our brain and so we must enjoy it Well I do anyway.It was fascinating when Sacks said that there are certain musical pieces that he has to listen to over and over again before he moves on to a new composer I can so relate to that I am on overkill at the moment with Grieg and Sibelius but there are indeed other composers waiting in the wings to enthrall me Music my What else can I possibly say I absolutely loved this book and continually look at it It is in my library and there to stay It s not a common characteristic, but I recommend this book for all environments where you read Coffee shop, living room, park bench, subway, or to ignore your spouse it receives my seal of 4 stars Musicophilia is a lurid, but respectable, look into the brains and lives of people that appear normal on the outside, but have strong, strange and intractable relationships to music The relationship is sometimes harmful, often incomprehensible, sometimes therapeutic, even charming, but always unf It s not a common characteristic, but I recommend this book for all environments where you read Coffee shop, living room, park bench, subway, or to ignore your spouse it receives my seal of 4 stars Musicophilia is a lurid, but respectable, look into the brains and lives of people that appear normal on the outside, but have strong, strange and intractable relationships to music The relationship is sometimes harmful, often incomprehensible, sometimes therapeutic, even charming, but always unforgettable And that s the bottom line here for this book incredibly interesting, highly readable, and, after reflecting about people in your lives with contagion to music, totally unforgettableWhy do some people hear every musical tone in irrepressible color, like fireworks Why do snippets of songs lodge in the brain for days, weeks, years, even a lifetime This is my introduction to Oliver Sacks A renown neuroscientist with over 5 decades of experience, and a talent for presenting case studies to a plebeian reading public The great majority of writers are not good writers And, they re not neuroscientists either Sacks, however, is bothWhat about the man with a 60 IQ who knows each note of 2500 symphonies Why do people with gross stuttering speak perfectly when they singEvery human has a disease Sometimes that disease is visible on the outside, and we stare and point, and tell our friends what we saw today an alien rheumatoid hand, a debilitating kyphosis, a piebald psoriasis scar Sometimes the affliction is in the mind and worn outside, like an Obsessive Compulisive Disorder, a neurodegeneration or a crippling social phobia But, for the most part, we all have something an undiagnosed disease or affliction something we can manage to hide from everyone so that people don t point and stare and go home and tell their friends about what they saw in us today Perversion, narco, nympho, criminality, victim, depression, protein mutation, future Alzheimer, next year s dementia, next week s suicide, next month s spousal abuse, future diabetic, compulsion, addiction We all mix together Some of it s our fault, some not But it s there And most of it s in the brain I like reading psychological analysis of material cases Psychology levels the playing field, in a manner It helps to know you re not the only one that suffers from hidden afflictionWhat about the man with amnesia so severe he can t remember anything beyond 7 seconds ago, yet he plays the piano flawlessly when he never could before Why does music induce epilepsyBased on a lifetime of personal interaction with patients, the author reveals scores of cases regarding music related idiosyncrasies Like a barbell, on the left are people who cringe at the sound of music, on the right are people who fail to thrive without music, and both sides are connected by a continuum, balanced through the middle Musicophilia is a compilation that highlights a very recent surge in psychoanalytic and neuroscientific interest in music based ailments and music based therapy There are fantastic new insights to how the brain compartmentalizes music, and how music is integrated as a global cortical tool Apparently the brain has allocated a large a mysteriously large global amount of neurons to music, and we are only beginning to understand how and why Medicine and science are beginning to pay attention to these emergent signs and symptoms What was once overlooked and ridiculed, a mere footnote in the literature, is now a fertile growth area in psychoanalysisWhy do only 1 in 1000 people have perfect pitch Why can music penetrate depression and dementia when human voice cannot This book may not be a watershed event in science, but it was for me I am amusical, arhythmic, and dysharmonic It was refreshing to read that many people are like me, on the left side of the barbell For every person that sings out loud or under their breath at work, there are 2 or 3 of us that can t carry a tune and refuse to karaoke It s not that I don t like music or can t be moved or buoyed by music it s simply that I don t have a complex relationship to music, and for the most part, I can take it or leave it I listen to music about 45 minutes a week, mostly on radio during commute I don t collect music, stay current with music, play music, or talk about music It s quite common, even though you music o philes gasp incredulously at my hideousness My parents are like this, my wife, my siblings, many of my friends If I was imprisoned, I would miss reading and exercise, but not musicWhy is the prime symptom of Williams Syndrome an indefatigable attraction to music Why do humans have music hallucinations Perhaps I was attracted to the title Musicophilia subconsciously I know I m socially deficient regarding things music, and maybe I wanted to discover what power music holds over people Perhaps I wanted to apply definitions and causes to my amusia Alas, I m not deficient My brain appreciates music, but has developed in other ways Despite Oliver Sack s covering cases like mine, I was quite interested to learn how important, indeed life sustaining, music is for certain brainsWhy does music cause such a constellation of emotion in humans Why does a brain on music light up like cherries during CAT scans My recently deceased grandfather had dementia near the end A lanky nonagenarian with a full shock of white hair He forgot a lot of things, including our names and when to urinate, but he didn t forget how to polka or whistle or play the harmonica Musicophilia will tell you why, but I like to think it s because Gramps had something special I can t yet find.I would have awarded 5 stars, but there was no transition between the chapters Sometimes that works, but in non fiction I like to see a framework guiding the book I discovered a loose organization, but each chapter could stand independently in a journal like Neuroscience, Scientific American, or Psychology Today Stillgreat take aways New words synesthesia, metanoia, hypnagogic, hypnopompic, anhedonia I am a huge sucker for pop science about human consciousness Sacks, unfortunately, has the habit of boring me with far too many anecdotes which he fails to link in any progression of Greater Understanding. This was unexpectedly touching I m glad I finally read it Review to come. Sacks is, for me, a perfect meeting of a science writer and a writer of creative non fiction He has an equal interest in telling an affecting, human story and with exploring how and why the brain works While lots of science writing is dry and objective as it should be and while mainstream feature writing often ignores thecomplicated science stuff, Sacks is a rare talent who has a penchant for story telling and for explaining the newest research on the brain He doesn t condescend, an Sacks is, for me, a perfect meeting of a science writer and a writer of creative non fiction He has an equal interest in telling an affecting, human story and with exploring how and why the brain works While lots of science writing is dry and objective as it should be and while mainstream feature writing often ignores thecomplicated science stuff, Sacks is a rare talent who has a penchant for story telling and for explaining the newest research on the brain He doesn t condescend, and he doesn t mind forming personal relationships with his subjects.In Musicophilia, Sacks focuses on the mysterious and fascinating connection between music and the brain Through studying musical oddities in patients, he hopes, we can hope to better understand our greater relationship with music something that, although it is universal among cultures, doesn t seem to have a clear function or origin.For example, the book opens with a middle aged man who is struck by lightening He isn t badly hurt, but since the accident, he s been obsessed with the urge to play the piano He s never really played before or had an interest in music, but suddenly he s up all night composing and trying to get better Why has this happened Why is unaffected except for this urge, which takes over his life Brain scans show that his left frontal lobe has been damaged and Sacks hypothesizes that the left hemisphere of the brain might actually inhibit thecreative and musical right side of the brain Left brain damage might lead tofreedom in the right brain.The book moves on from there to cover a huge spectrum of diseases, phenomenones, and rarities spanning from music therapy for those with dementia and Alzheimer s, to people who suffer from musical hallucinations, to people with perfect pitch, to people with amusica to them, music sounds like noise Nabokov suffered from it , to musical savants The structures of the chapters are very satisfying to me they start with a story of an individual and then, by the end of the segment, lead to ageneral description of the science behind the patient s symptoms.One of thefascinating chapters covers children with William s Syndrome, which affects about one out of 10,000 people These people, who all have strangely elfin features, suffer from severe mental disabilities they can t ad 5 3, they can t draw a square, they can t tie their shoes They have IQs around 60 However, they also tend to be very verbal, very social, and exceptionally musical Most have perfect pitch and start composing as toddlers Unlike some cases of severe autism who show amechanical and isolated musical talent, patients with William s Syndrome love to play music in groups within a community Sacks visits a camp for children with William s Syndrome which is a constant drum circle, sing along, and musical wrapped up in one.As in all of his tales, Sacks is sure to find the hope and humanity in even the most difficult patients One man, an amnesiac who has a short term memory of only a few seconds, can only stay present within himself while he plays the piano.More importantly, Sacks doesn t see his patients as freaks or abnormalities who are simply interesting to read about, but rather as windows into how we can collectively understand how we function In Musicophilia, I was truly moved by what I read both by the humanity of the patients and by the awesomeness of the science ^DOWNLOAD ⇖ Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain ↟ With the same trademark compassion and erudition he brought to The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Oliver Sacks explores the place music occupies in the brain and how it affects the human condition In Musicophilia, he shows us a variety of what he calls musical misalignments Among them a man struck by lightning who suddenly desires to become a pianist at the age of forty two an entire group of children with Williams syndrome, who are hypermusical from birth people with amusia, to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans and a man whose memory spans only seven seconds for everything but music Illuminating, inspiring, and utterly unforgettable, Musicophilia is Oliver Sacks latest masterpiece