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!Download ♷ Shutterbabe: Adventures in Love and War ☮ On a wintry night in February ,year old Deborah Copaken Kogan is the lone female among a group of Afghan freedom fighters riding through the Hindu Kush mountains In my lap, hopping atop my thighs as the truck lurches, as my body shivers, sits a sturdy canvas Domke bag filled with Nikons and Kodachrome film, which I m hoping to use to photograph the pull out of the Soviet troops from Afghanistan Actually, I have no idea how to photograph a Soviet pull out Though this is my second story as a professional photojournalist, I m still not clear on what it is photojournalists actually do in a real war What follows is the hilarious and winning memoir of a young woman finding and fighting her way through the war zones of the world It is a thrilling coming of age story, told with humour and uncommon wisdom, about how one woman fought her way on to battlefields, and the danger, pain, truths and love she discovered there look past the stupid title and the simplistic i m a feminist because i have lots of sex like a man argument, and there s a really interesting account of the photojournalist process here.for any woman or man who has fantasized about covering jihadists in afghanistan, guerilla wars, coups, or other major world issues with your camera really for anyone who would like an exciting, dangerous, travel filled life. Cheesy title, I know And in the first two pages, I wasn t sure if I wanted to continue, so loud were the author s claims on feminism She starts out on the back of a truck in Afghanistan, in the male dominated 1980 s world of photojournalism, lamenting her lack of tampons But stick with it, I swear it s worth it The truth is, photojournalism really was a boys club, and I doubt I d have understood the extent of it without reading this book But it s not entirely the main focus of the book, Cheesy title, I know And in the first two pages, I wasn t sure if I wanted to continue, so loud were the author s claims on feminism She starts out on the back of a truck in Afghanistan, in the male dominated 1980 s world of photojournalism, lamenting her lack of tampons But stick with it, I swear it s worth it The truth is, photojournalism really was a boys club, and I doubt I d have understood the extent of it without reading this book But it s not entirely the main focus of the book, and is nearly canceled out by the constant parade of men with whom the author has flings of varying length and intensity I didn t read it for the sex scenes, and I didn t read it for the sometimes enlightening, sometimes overdone feminism, so what is this book good for WARS She describes the boredom, horror, filth, and hilarity of war zones in a way that s downright addictive Her lack of knowledge that feeling of how does everybody but me understand the intricacies of this conflict already is also extra relatable and endearing It helps that she s doing a job I always imagined myself doing until I had to actually pay for things , and it helps that reading about other terrains always feels like the best escape The stuff that keeps me from giving this book, which I loved, all five stars were a few too many scenes in which the eyes of men are described in cringey detail, and the whole end part about motherhood Not that the motherhood thing is bad, it s just not as interesting as being stranded in the middle of the jungle Plus I m sick of all my recent authors feeling some obligation to do the moral of this story older and wiser thing Just end it with a bang, already This is an autobiography of a short, female photojournalist working in a man s world I liked it because I once had similar aspirations and am vertical challenged , but did not have the courage or self belief of Deborah Copaken Kogan So the majority of the book provided fascinating what ifs for me Then, she discovers the struggle to balance career and motherhood, which is universal these days This seemed a bit self indulgent and ordinary like looking at pictures of a stranger s child T This is an autobiography of a short, female photojournalist working in a man s world I liked it because I once had similar aspirations and am vertical challenged , but did not have the courage or self belief of Deborah Copaken Kogan So the majority of the book provided fascinating what ifs for me Then, she discovers the struggle to balance career and motherhood, which is universal these days This seemed a bit self indulgent and ordinary like looking at pictures of a stranger s child The book should have ended before it did This memoir was one of thedifficult books I ve read, both because Kogan was relatable, and wholly unrelatable Kogan s memoir was difficult to relate to because her experiences paint her as reckless and morally loose Until the last 2 chapters, it seemed that her experiences, which are framed inside which lover she is experiencing at the time, were not serving to help her grow and become a better person In fact, I wondered for 3 4 of the book if this memoir was an excuse to retell her sex This memoir was one of thedifficult books I ve read, both because Kogan was relatable, and wholly unrelatable Kogan s memoir was difficult to relate to because her experiences paint her as reckless and morally loose Until the last 2 chapters, it seemed that her experiences, which are framed inside which lover she is experiencing at the time, were not serving to help her grow and become a better person In fact, I wondered for 3 4 of the book if this memoir was an excuse to retell her sexual exploits However, near the end of my reading, I realized that Kogan has a good story to tell, however she has very little experience story telling, which meant that her personal development and growth which was the point after all was not conveyed well Her lack of experience in character development, which happened to be herself, resulted in a somewhat cliche story of a feminist girl growing up to realize that she did want to have conventional womanhood in her life after all.On the positive side, once I read the entire book, I realized that I could relate to her framework if I chose to look at my life through the lens she chose I too could chronicle my experiences through the lens of which man I was dating at the time, though I don t think that I would necessarily choose to do that myself I suppose she chose to do this because one of the things she needed to learn what what love was, and she just happened to go about it in a difficult manner She was an insecure girl who insisted she was a feminist, yet couldn t go a moment without the attention of a man So, after many men, she finally found the one she loved and loved her back Though, as I m writing this and trying to be positive, I find this theme still cliche.I am happy that, as a character, she did grow and develop This is critical to any story, and it was interesting to see that,in the end, she came to realize that what she truly wanted was to be a wife a mother despite her decade of fighting against that notion She had to find a reason to stop being reckless and running into war, she had to find a reason to live and to value her life and another s life I think this is a journey most of us go though, it is a coming of age type of story Though, I suppose all this story is, is a memoir of what it is like to gain maturity The afterword was not my favorite Kogan is about to publish her book just as 9 11 happens outside her window as she lives in Manhattan I wonder if I had read this book around the time when the towers fell that I would have appreciated her metaphor for America being raped by the destruction of the Twin Towers However, again, it felt forced and a cliche Though, I have to concede that this may be a result of over 15 years of 9 11 metaphors at this point Her thoughts may have been original and deep at the time.The most difficult thing about this book is that I cannot think of one person I would recommend this book to Kogan s use of language, sexual content, and her experiences in war make it difficult to pass along It s almost like you would have to find this book on your own to read it Though I think her story has value, it is not the most inspiring coming of age memoir out there I would probably recommend another memoir over this one if I though someone would benefit from a book about maturing This was fine I picked it up thinking it d be a memoir about being a female war photojournalist in the late 80s early 90s, and it was But it was partly also a romantic memoir, enumerating the author s relationships with the men she met partly an account of being a photographer and how payments and agencies and publication rights worked in the journalism circuit during that time and partly a treatise reflections on the author s approach to feminism and partly also about motherhood, and This was fine I picked it up thinking it d be a memoir about being a female war photojournalist in the late 80s early 90s, and it was But it was partly also a romantic memoir, enumerating the author s relationships with the men she met partly an account of being a photographer and how payments and agencies and publication rights worked in the journalism circuit during that time and partly a treatise reflections on the author s approach to feminism and partly also about motherhood, and partly also about war and the Jewish legacy and partly about poaching, rape, and the fall of the Soviet Union It was a lot of things at once, with sudden lurches in tone occasionally breezy sex memoir and occasionally a stomach churning snapshot of Romanian orphanages No doubt Kogan has led a very interesting life, but the book felt disparate ironically, for a photographer, it felt out of focus I was definitely speed reading through the end I liked the moments when Kogan questions the ethics of her job and how it impacts on her own sense of morality, her way of seeing the world There are instances where Kogan pays a heroin addict to shoot up so that she can shoot him or moments when she waits for a poacher to be shot so that she can spring through the jungle quickly to, also, shoot him and accounts of nightmares and questions about her own culpability and responsibility balanced against her own need to earn a living These moments, however, however incandescent, are brief Maybe it s not the story Kogan wanted to tell, or only part of her wider story While I ultimately didn t really like the book, I m sympathetic the task of tidying your life into neat narrative isn t an easy one Call it the curse of the photographer Unlike the memories of my childhood fuzzy around the edges, suffusedwith movement and smell and sound than with the rigidity of graphic lines and shapes most of the memories I have since becoming a photographer are four sided and flat When you learn to properly frame an image in the viewfinder of a camera, you start to frame and catalog everything you see, whether you photograph it or not And suddenly, memory has the shape of a rectangle The vastness of a forest becomes twelve trees with a rock balancing out the foreground A person becomes a close up of the crow s feet around his eyes A war becomes red blood in white snow Sometimes I feel like my brain has become nothingthan an overstuffed spiral notebook full of negatives, printed at will in a disorganized flurry by the slightest provocation I stop to change my film Without the camera to shield my eyes, I start to feel weak Queasy The room tilts I see the heart lying there, inert and cold I see the women shoving it back inside the chest cavity I picture the cavity behind my eyes, and instead of a brain I imagine an enormous roll of film, winding maniacally inside a bloodless metallic skull A simple recording device, nothing Deborah Copaken Kogan graduated from Harvard in 1988 and plunged straight into the world of photojournalism Like most fresh grads, reality is something college doesn t prepare you for return return Living in Paris, she knocked on agency doors for an assignment Within weeks, she was in Afghanistan with Pascal, asenior photojournalist who promised that he would help get her into the thick of the war return return The book opens with her travelling in a group of mujahideen rebel free Deborah Copaken Kogan graduated from Harvard in 1988 and plunged straight into the world of photojournalism Like most fresh grads, reality is something college doesn t prepare you for return return Living in Paris, she knocked on agency doors for an assignment Within weeks, she was in Afghanistan with Pascal, asenior photojournalist who promised that he would help get her into the thick of the war return return The book opens with her travelling in a group of mujahideen rebel freedom fighters , shortly after Pascal abandoned her, forcing her to make her own arrangements So her short career in photojournalism begins, and they lead her into some very hairy situations, in parts of history that I was too young to care about at the time return return Kogan gives us a peek into the world of the photojournalist fraternity, a group dominated by men For that reason, the book is broken down into six chapters that relates to a man in her life and career starting with Pascal, who took her into her first war and ending with her son Jacob, who is the reason she decided to end her career return return Her memoirs, candid as it may be in some places, is eye opening to those of us who have no idea how the international media works It also hammers home the fact that it is sometimes necessary for journalists to lie, bribe and persuade so that their journey would not be for nothing, and they will bring back images that will help cover their expenses return return At one point of the book, Kogan described feeling like a vulture as she entered the scene to photograph an African poacher shot dead There is, after all, no story without a dead body Horrifying That s the media industry return return Kogan s photographs have appeared in magazines such as Time, Newsweek, and the New York Times, her freelance writing in The New York Times, Paris Match, and O, the Oprah Magazine, and her television segments on ABC News and Dateline NBC return return 2006 This is a memoir of a young woman who becomes a war photographer without really knowing what she s getting into She s a bit wild, looking for adventure, and in a very male dominated world, working in very male dominated countries I liked parts of the beginning of the book, just because her experiences were so unusual and her perspective was so interesting But it gradually fell apart for me towards the second half, when she basically renounces her youthful follies and settles down to be a This is a memoir of a young woman who becomes a war photographer without really knowing what she s getting into She s a bit wild, looking for adventure, and in a very male dominated world, working in very male dominated countries I liked parts of the beginning of the book, just because her experiences were so unusual and her perspective was so interesting But it gradually fell apart for me towards the second half, when she basically renounces her youthful follies and settles down to be a grownup.Of course, this is, in fact, her story, so it s not exactly that it doesn t ring true But somehow it doesn t The events of course, are obviously true, but it s like she s tried to overlay this story with a dramatic arc and character development on top of it orlike some editor told her that her memoir needed to have a dramatic arc and character development It just transitions too abruptly and doesn t really make sense which wouldn t matter as much, I think, if she didn t try so darn hard to make it make sense.It s also very much one of those books that in the end says, Hey Girls You can try for a while, but you can t have it all , since I couldn t, so just give it up and settle down Which is really sort of disappointing since she was such a barrier breaker in her youth It s like your only choices in life are a defy all convention and give up anything positive that might come with conventionality, or b suck it up and be a conformist Maybe she couldn t find the middle path which, again, wouldn t be such an issue if she didn t seem to be trying so hard to overlay a message on the book.I guess I wanted to like the bookthan I did I did think that the author seemed like a really interesting person and I enjoyed reading about her experiences It was the overlaid messages that I objected to, and they really ruined the book for me I ve added a new shelf in honor of this book, whose name was changed despite the author s objections From newswhore to shutterbabe is definitely a step in the chick ification. If you enjoy vicariously living a life of adventure, this book may be for you The memories of a thrill seeking photojournalist, fresh out of school and anxious to make a name for herself, are often harrowing tales of near misses and last minute rescues both at the battle front and in the bedroom Working in the competitive male dominated world of photojournalism requires her to take risks and witness events that no one should Her close encounters with world events from the late 80s and early If you enjoy vicariously living a life of adventure, this book may be for you The memories of a thrill seeking photojournalist, fresh out of school and anxious to make a name for herself, are often harrowing tales of near misses and last minute rescues both at the battle front and in the bedroom Working in the competitive male dominated world of photojournalism requires her to take risks and witness events that no one should Her close encounters with world events from the late 80s and early 90s like the Afghan Russian war and the children in Bosnian orphanages, to name a few, cast a personal, close up and raw look at stories from the front pages of that era The adrenaline seeking youngster gradually finds her lifestyle at odds with her long term life goals Here comes the spoiler She finds her husband to be and leaves her beloved camera behind for apractical job producing television news programs When that too interferes once too often with her family life, she gives up her career completely to become a full time mother