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Phillip Pullman says The Magic Pudding, Being the Adventures of Bunyip Bluegum and his friends Bill Barnacle and Sam Sawnoff is his favourite book He maintains that it is,the funniest children s book ever writtenAnd theNew York Review of Bookscalls it,Wild and woolly, funny and outrageously funIt certainly is extremely silly and engaging, this Australian children s story, a classic from 1918 Written and illustrated by Norman Lindsay, it is partly a narrative, and partly in rhymin Phillip Pullman says The Magic Pudding, Being the Adventures of Bunyip Bluegum and his friends Bill Barnacle and Sam Sawnoff is his favourite book He maintains that it is,the funniest children s book ever writtenAnd theNew York Review of Bookscalls it,Wild and woolly, funny and outrageously funIt certainly is extremely silly and engaging, this Australian children s story, a classic from 1918 Written and illustrated by Norman Lindsay, it is partly a narrative, and partly in rhyming verse Reading it feels like reading a cross between Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear and A A MilneAlice in Wonderlanddates from 1865, and Edward Lear sNonsense Songsfrom 1871, so it can be inferred that these works might have had an influence on the authorWinnie the Poohhowever, dates from 1926, so clearly this work did not It is very much akin to that type of literature, however And as with those authors, although the story and characters appeal to very young children, it is a story which is better read aloud, as the language used is sometimes quite difficult.The story is about a group of friends, wild Australian anthropomorphised creatures The two main characters are Bunyip Bluegum and his Uncle Wattleberry, both koalas, whose pomposity may make you laugh out loud In fact Uncle Wattleberry performs a similar role to Owl, in theWinnie the Poohstories,Apologies are totally inadequate, shouted Uncle Wattleberry Nothing short of felling you to the earth with an umbrella could possibly atone for the outrage You are a danger to the whisker growing public You have knocked my hat off, pulled my whiskers, and tried to remove my nose There is Bill Barnacle the sailor, and Sam Sawnoff the penguin Then there is Albert the cantankerous pudding of the title He is magic, because no matter how often the pudding is eaten, he always becomes whole again surely every child s dream of a puddingThere s nothing this Puddin enjoysthan offering slices of himself to strangers,says Bill Barnacle These friends become theNoble Society of Pudding Owners On their travels they meet with several other animal characters There s Henderson Hedgehog Horticulturalist, alow larrikinKookaburra, a parrot who was a Swagman or a Swagman who was a parrot , an elderly dog and market gardener Benjimin Brandysnap, and a bandicootnaturally of a terrified dispositioncarrying a melon And every now and then theNoble Society of Pudding Ownersare set upon by two dastardly puddin thieves, the Wombat and thesnooting snouting scoundrel,the Possum The story romps along with abandon, including sailors, firemen, and culminating in a court scene, in the sleepy town of Tooraloo This is very reminiscent of the Queen of Hearts s Court inAlice s Adventures in WonderlandThere is even a reference to cards, as the judge and the court usher are playing cards It has a similar feeling of elaborate speechifying and pomposity, and a similarly chaotic dreamlike ending to the episode.Adults may well find themselves chortling along with the children,The Mayor turned so pale at this that the Constable had to thrust a banana into his mouth to restore his courage Thank you, said the Mayor peevishly but, on the whole, I prefer to be restored with peeled bananas, You re a carrot nosed poltroon, said the Puddin loudly, As for the Mayor he s a sausage shaped porous plaster Everything is described with hilarity and extravagance It is a children s fantasy without a witch or a goblin in sight Norman Lindsay maintained that children were mainly interested in food and fighting, rather than fairies, and that is what he chose to write his story aboutHearty eaters, as Sam Sawnoff says, are always welcome The story is full of charm and whimsy Every page has line drawings, also by Norman Lindsay The verses, so similar to Edward Lear, are little stories in themselves, reflect the varying moods of the characters Most of all though, it is rumbustious, Australian to its core, and fun Expect a great deal of exuberance and a dash of oddity especially in the versifying, because,The exigencies of rhyme, said Bunyip Bluegum, may stand excused from a too strict insistence on verisimilitude, so that the general gaiety is thereby promoted Here s a personal favourite, where Benjimin Brandysnap reads his defence to the jurythe activity of the vegetables, as hereunder described On Tuesday morn, as it happened by chance, The parsnips stormed in a rage, Because the young carrots were singing like parrots On top of the onions cage The radishes swarmed on the angry air Around with the bumble bees, While the brussels sprouts were pulling the snouts Of all the young French peas The artichokes bounded up and down On top of the pumpkins heads And the cabbage was dancing the highland fling All over the onion beds So I hadn t much time, as Your Honour perceives For watching the habits of puddin thieves This is a much larger edition of The Magic Pudding Being The Adventures Of Bunyip Bluegum And His Friends Bill Barnacle And Sam Sawnoff, approximately 12 x 9 or 30cm x 23cm which will replace my earlier one Super de luxe or what you will, the main thing is that these illustrations by the author Norman Lindsay are in colour, and a much better size to enjoy.Sorry, Puffin books, but this is the one I am going with My review of the text is LINK HERE This is a much larger edition of The Magic Pudding Being The Adventures Of Bunyip Bluegum And His Friends Bill Barnacle And Sam Sawnoff, approximately 12 x 9 or 30cm x 23cm which will replace my earlier one Super de luxe or what you will, the main thing is that these illustrations by the author Norman Lindsay are in colour, and a much better size to enjoy.Sorry, Puffin books, but this is the one I am going with My review of the text is LINK HERE The funniest children s book ever written I don t think so But then, Philip Pullman, who wrote the introduction, never struck me as being much good at humor himself It s a fine introduction, though, especially for a children s book Pullman obviously loves the puddin adventures and his excitement about reading is clear The book itself is fun, cute, and clever I don t think, even had I read it as a child, that it would have been dear to my heart they way it was to Pullman s that characte The funniest children s book ever written I don t think so But then, Philip Pullman, who wrote the introduction, never struck me as being much good at humor himself It s a fine introduction, though, especially for a children s book Pullman obviously loves the puddin adventures and his excitement about reading is clear The book itself is fun, cute, and clever I don t think, even had I read it as a child, that it would have been dear to my heart they way it was to Pullman s that characters are too slight and the stakes too low To be honest, by halfway through the episodes began to pall However, there are a number of amusing scenes and good one liners, such as The incident, though similar as regards courage and darin , is totally different in regard to everything elseor Nothing short of felling you to the earth with an umbrella could possibly atone for the outrage.I was also quite tickled by the last page where Lindsay writes, The Picture opposite saves the trouble of explaining.Lindsay feels like a fun and sympatico guy, and I d be interested in trying one of his scandalous at the time, apparently adult novels He was also an again, scandalous artist 3.5 sAlbert the magic pudding s name , was surrounded by his owners Sailor Bill, Bunyip Bluegum and Sam Sawnoff The pudding was steak and kidney, but when whistled at and turned around, it was something else It also never ran out because it was magic The pudding thieves tried and tried again but it always ended up back in the rightful owners hands The Magic Pudding is a delightful fable written by Aussie author and artist Norman Lindsay, back in 1918 for children everywhere It s bea 3.5 sAlbert the magic pudding s name , was surrounded by his owners Sailor Bill, Bunyip Bluegum and Sam Sawnoff The pudding was steak and kidney, but when whistled at and turned around, it was something else It also never ran out because it was magic The pudding thieves tried and tried again but it always ended up back in the rightful owners hands The Magic Pudding is a delightful fable written by Aussie author and artist Norman Lindsay, back in 1918 for children everywhere It s beautifully illustrated, even my kindle copy, and throughout the story the friends break into song and recite poetry to their hearts content I downloaded my copy from Project Gutenburg for free, which anyone can do who so wishes This Australian children s classic is one that should be read by all lovers of great literature who enjoy a light, fun filled and entertaining read [ Read Book ] ☤ The Magic Pudding ♚ The adventures of those splendid fellows Bunyip Bluegum, Bill Barnacle and Sam Sawnoff, the penguin bold, and of course their amazing, everlasting and very cantankerous Puddin Norman Lindsay was one of Australia s most famous and controversial artists, and his drawings alone would be reason enough to add The Magic Pudding to anyone s library, but the text which he also wrote is bloody hilarious.Which character is funniest the hook nosed, insolent parrot The blooming old rooster with his singed feathers Uncle Wattleberry, in full bounding and plunging mode Or the Puddin himself, always eager to be eaten An utter classic from a high yielding imagination. I came to re read this beloved book from my childhood recently as a kind of companion volume to the biography of it s author that I was at the time reading Having read the circumstances around The Magic Pudding being written I simply had to re read it.It stands the tests of time very well, but with a few unusual conclusions For example, I am not sure that it would be something the modern parent would be unequivocally enthusiastic about giving to a five year old the protagonists are very ready I came to re read this beloved book from my childhood recently as a kind of companion volume to the biography of it s author that I was at the time reading Having read the circumstances around The Magic Pudding being written I simply had to re read it.It stands the tests of time very well, but with a few unusual conclusions For example, I am not sure that it would be something the modern parent would be unequivocally enthusiastic about giving to a five year old the protagonists are very ready to brawl with the puddin thieves and I m not sure how that level of enthusiasm for fisticuffs would go.How would a modern child feel about the regular poetic verses Poetry used to be a big thing in kids books, but I don t think it is so much any.In any case, I think all age groups should adore the artwork as much as I did when I was six and still do today, it is delightful in the extreme and if it has dated to the point of beingfor older kids and adults, well, it is still quite thoroughly enjoyable for kids my age I couldn t remember whether I d ever read this before or not, and now I m finished, I m still not sure It is a children s book, but a classic one not sure how many kids of today would read it It is funny about a pudding which no matter how much you eat never gets consumed, and the pudding owners and some pudding stealers All very silly, but in a good way, but I have to say, I feel a bit sorry for the pudding owners I know I would get heartily sick of steak and kidney pie, boiled jam roll I couldn t remember whether I d ever read this before or not, and now I m finished, I m still not sure It is a children s book, but a classic one not sure how many kids of today would read it It is funny about a pudding which no matter how much you eat never gets consumed, and the pudding owners and some pudding stealers All very silly, but in a good way, but I have to say, I feel a bit sorry for the pudding owners I know I would get heartily sick of steak and kidney pie, boiled jam roll, apple dumpling and plum duff, which seem to be all the puddings the Magic Pudding knows how to produce Read this one a while ago Just remembering it for reasons too complicated and silly to repeat here This is pretty absurd fun about a living and treacherous pudding and its travel companions as all keepers of the pudding come to discover, it s hard to be in possession of a pudding that everybody wants That s about all I remember I was at a friend s house when I read it was babysitting and reading the book with a nine year old and we were laughing quite a bit We didn t get through the wh Read this one a while ago Just remembering it for reasons too complicated and silly to repeat here This is pretty absurd fun about a living and treacherous pudding and its travel companions as all keepers of the pudding come to discover, it s hard to be in possession of a pudding that everybody wants That s about all I remember I was at a friend s house when I read it was babysitting and reading the book with a nine year old and we were laughing quite a bit We didn t get through the whole book According to another reviewer there are a few digs at Jews in here Glad I missed that part somehow Perhaps I will read it again soon and write a much better review I had a big reorganising of my bookshelves a few weeks ago, and found, tucked away on the bottom shelf of one bookcase alongside random books Japanese dictionaries and textbooks, old teen books from when I was a teen, a Jamima Puddleduck book and various other odds and ends this old Australian classic Norman Lindsay is a famous Australian artist, poet and author I hope that Australians today still know who he is but I wouldn t be surprised saddened, yes, but not surprised to discover I had a big reorganising of my bookshelves a few weeks ago, and found, tucked away on the bottom shelf of one bookcase alongside random books Japanese dictionaries and textbooks, old teen books from when I was a teen, a Jamima Puddleduck book and various other odds and ends this old Australian classic Norman Lindsay is a famous Australian artist, poet and author I hope that Australians today still know who he is but I wouldn t be surprised saddened, yes, but not surprised to discover that they don t We re just not that good at keeping our famous people, our great people, alive in our memories, with a couple of exceptions It s hard to gauge though, since it s been quite a while since I left.Norman Lindsay is famous for his provocative and challenging paintings, around which they made a movie called Sirens with Sam Neill as Lindsay that, despite a stilted performance by Elle MacPherson is a great movie to watch I can practically smell the eucalypts Lindsay is also well known as a children s author, a sculptor, a poet and an erotic sketch artist His nudes are luscious His work is often provocative When I was little, my mother gave me this book The inscription reads To Shannon, for helping me shift the rock heap Love from Mum and the date, 4th of September 1985, when I was just four years old nearly five Books were a rare treat, as were presents outside of birthdays and Christmas, so I treasured this The rock heap she s referring to would have been in the garden the patch of land, 1 1 4 acres, that my parents bought off my grandfather to build a home on was a corner of the farm that was no good for farming, being a small hill or rise full of rocks and several very tall, very skinny pine trees that creaked in the wind They re all gone now The garden paths are all made using the rocks dug up from the garden, of which we never run out Even on the farm, the worst job of all was picking up rocks after a paddock had been ploughed Crappy job I was too young to read it too many words but I loved gazing at the pictures, especially the one at the back I made up a story in my head to go with the illustration, but over the years I forgot all about this book When I rediscovered it, having followed me throughout my youth and many moves, I put it on my desk so I d remember to read it And finally, 15 years after my mum gave it to me, I did.This is the story of Bunyip Bluegum, a koala, who lives with his Uncle Wattleberry Unfortunately, there isn t enough room in the tree for the two of them and Uncle Wattleberry s huge whiskers, so Bunyip leaves home to explore the world He comes across two characters an old sailor named Bill and his mate Sam the penguin They are proud professional puddin owners , being in the possession of a magic pudding It can become several kinds of pudding, their favourites being steak n kidney and plum duff It also walks and talks and never shrinks It is a magic pudding.Others covet their pudding a Possum and a Wombat, while easily cowed by a punch to the nose, try again and again to steal the pudding With Bunyip s help, they fight off Possum and Wombat, meet a host of other interesting characters and tell the story of two ships called the Saucy Sausage and the Salt Junk Sarah and how Bill and Sam came by the pudding in the first place.Lindsay s animal and human characters often break into rhyme or song, and not at a young child s reading level We laugh with scorn at threats, said Bill, and he added as a warning I don t repent a snout that s bent,And if again I tap it,Oh, with a clout I ll bend that snoutWith force enough to snap it and Sam added for the Wombat s benefit I take no shame to fight the lameWhen they deserve to cop it.So do not try to pipe your eye, Or with my flip I ll flop it p34 Yeah, they get a bit violent in the cartoon sense, like watching old Warner Bros cartoons It s very early 20th century in its tone, even with a dig or two at Jews As a classic though, you have to take it in historical context, like with the Danish picture book Rasmus Some of the language will be tricky for today s youth, or non Australians It is at times full of lingo, a mix of British and Australian To start with, they had an unpleasant scene with a Kookaburra, a low larrikin who resented the way that Bill examined him Who are you starin at, Poodle s Whiskers he asked Never mind, said Bill I m starin at you for a good and sufficient reason Are yer said the Kookaburra Well, all I can say is that if yer don t take yer dial outer the road I ll bloomin well take an bounce a gibber off yer crust, and he followed them for quite a long way, singing out insulting things such as, You with the wire whiskers, and Get onter the bloke with the face fringe p90 I could probably read an analogy into this story maybe the pudding, with its renewable resources, represents the country, and the possum and wombat thieves who want to plunder it Or, today, the logging and mining industries, or perhaps just people themselves I couldn t say what Lindsay intended, if anything, and you can certainly read it as a fun tale that teaches against thievery, deception and covetousness I like the environmental angle though, it smy style.I wish I had memories of reading it at a younger age, that would have been nice or of having it read to me, which would be even better But I m so glad I still have it, and it was such a delightful, rollicking fun story I wouldn t want to see Lindsay slide into obscurity, and I hope he never does But who outside of Australia has ever heard of him